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Bypassing emissions on modern tractors?


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Company I drive for is about 95% gliders with 60 series Detroit’s emissions trucks were costing them to much in down time and missed loads as we run auto parts direct to the plants one late load can shut down an entire plant we also run our trucks to a million plus miles 

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6 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

You can’t tell our trucks have been deleted just walking by. The def tank is still there and so is the exhaust muffler.  We removed the muffler and reemed it out and reinstalled it.  

California is starting roadside OBDII testing, if they detect any faults your parked until you can pass all tests.  

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1 hour ago, Cliff Neubauer said:

California is starting roadside OBDII testing, if they detect any faults your parked until you can pass all tests.  

sounds like a great opportunity for remote roadside service business - yet another reason why i have only been to CA one time 

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As others have said for that application of the 4BT it best to leave it alone and run it.

Then the dealer can work on it still if you get to that point.

There is some performance stuff for them but this mostly for the pump and pipe engines used in swaps for pick ups and jeeps 

They were the main power of bread trucks for years 

 

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1 hour ago, jeeper61 said:

They were the main power of bread trucks for years 

 

when i fire up my intact 6.7 ford in the garage it smells like a bread factory with door open, ever notice the bakery smell coming up i-29 south of omaha? i think the corn plant smells like that 

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3 hours ago, searcyfarms said:

when i fire up my intact 6.7 ford in the garage it smells like a bread factory with door open, ever notice the bakery smell coming up i-29 south of omaha? i think the corn plant smells like that 

If’n you still had your 6.0, you can delete the EGR but leave the EGR valve intact, the pickup doesn’t know the difference. 

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To the OP, you might want to look at the engine offerings on the newer machines. The newer Case TLBs use an FPT engine called an F5 series, not a Cummins-based engine. Same engine used in the newer CNH skidloaders and smaller Farmall tractors.

Generally speaking, Cummins-based engines in CNH products did not have any aftertreatment system for emissions. Aftertreatment systems came along when the Cummins-based engines were replaced with FPT engines. 

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21 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

Except Torgersons deletes the emissions on their own tractors they farm with.  We have three 2013 Pete’s that have been deleted.  The local independent mechanic had no problem working on them.  

Yeah, because they own the tractors and the means to work on them. Warranty? What warranty. "Fix this for the boss, don't worry about invoicing it."

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3 hours ago, SDman said:

To the OP, you might want to look at the engine offerings on the newer machines. The newer Case TLBs use an FPT engine called an F5 series, not a Cummins-based engine. Same engine used in the newer CNH skidloaders and smaller Farmall tractors.

Generally speaking, Cummins-based engines in CNH products did not have any aftertreatment system for emissions. Aftertreatment systems came along when the Cummins-based engines were replaced with FPT engines. 

Any idea when they changed? 

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11 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

Any idea when they changed? 

On the ag side, CNH went to Tier IV emissions in 2011 for high HP applications, 2012 for lower HP applications like skid steers. I'm guessing the construction side was similar. I'm not sure on the construction side, but the 3.9/5.9L Cummins engines pretty much disappeared from CaseIH equipment by 2005 or so. They were replaced by the 4.5L/6.7L NEF series engines by then. They were made for several years with no DEF/emissions equipment. The NEF engines were every bit as good as the Cummins engines.

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6 hours ago, SDman said:

The NEF engines were every bit as good as the Cummins engines.

SDman, do you remember the early "white" serial tag NEF engines that didn't get a proper washing and casting sand called them home at a very young age? Installed quite a few new engines is machines under 100 hours of operation. Seems like we also had our fair share of injection pump problems on the mechanical engines, that said a lot of that could be traced back to fuel senders that cracked inside tank an created an air ingress. 

That said I would agree that so far they have been a good engine. 

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10 minutes ago, CIHTECH said:

SDman, do you remember the early "white" serial tag NEF engines that didn't get a proper washing and casting sand called them home at a very young age? Installed quite a few new engines is machines under 100 hours of operation. Seems like we also had our fair share of injection pump problems on the mechanical engines, that said a lot of that could be traced back to fuel senders that cracked inside tank an created an air ingress. 

That said I would agree that so far they have been a good engine. 

That is interesting. Because in one of the farmall history books International was  having problems at one factory with sand from casting ruining engines, that factory had a high failure rate. I want to say it was in the south if I remember. History repeats itself, and those that don’t study history are doomed to fail they say.

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1 hour ago, CIHTECH said:

SDman, do you remember the early "white" serial tag NEF engines that didn't get a proper washing and casting sand called them home at a very young age? Installed quite a few new engines is machines under 100 hours of operation. Seems like we also had our fair share of injection pump problems on the mechanical engines, that said a lot of that could be traced back to fuel senders that cracked inside tank an created an air ingress. 

That said I would agree that so far they have been a good engine. 

Approximately what era are these white tag machines and what should i be looking for them in terms of avoiding them? 

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39 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

Approximately what era are these white tag machines and what should i be looking for them in terms of avoiding them?

Early production of 400 series skid loaders, white serial tag with black letters. When problem was identified serial tag was changed to black with white lettering. They are all worked thru the system at this point unless there is a time capsule somewhere. Not everyone caused / was a problem. See white tags come thru shop today and note virgin paint on engine fasteners, the next one will have paint disturbed and black tag. 

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2 hours ago, New Englander said:

For that much money I think I'd be inclined to live with it.

That would depend on repair costs 

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Ekotuning is a company that specializes in stuff like this. Fellow that was a couple Years younger then me in school is doing it here on the side.  He’s been into the dealers shops doing the tuning for them. There’s some other options out there too though. Our new skid steer will get deleted someday probably. For now everything is working as it should and no problems with it so far. New truck is a different story.  With no parts available to fix it under warranty the dealership took care of it lol.  

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I heard an interesting tidbit yesterday, it requires more research. Seems DEF goes stale/bad, both in an open container and with too much in a tank. The proposal was to run DEF tanks dry or nearly so before adding new, and discard container once DEF tank is full regardless of how much is left. The claim was that this practice eliminates  all the DEF related issues on Modern diesels. 

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17 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

I heard an interesting tidbit yesterday, it requires more research. Seems DEF goes stale/bad, both in an open container and with too much in a tank. The proposal was to run DEF tanks dry or nearly so before adding new, and discard container once DEF tank is full regardless of how much is left. The claim was that this practice eliminates  all the DEF related issues on Modern diesels. 

Keep jug from freezing and it lasts for a year

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I think that it would be wise to PM each other's phone number if you are discussing deleting anything and who does it. The scumbag EPA is crippling guys with fines and I wouldn't want to see anyone on here hurt by yet another overreach of the damn government.  You never know who is watching the forums.  Im sorry if I sound too tinfoil hat, I just wanted to give a warning is all. No offense to anyone here.

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41 minutes ago, jass1660 said:

Keep jug from freezing and it lasts for a year

Longer than that. I’ve seen DEF stored at room temperature last 2-3 years with no problems. Also, keep it out of direct sunlight. 
 

If in doubt, they make DEF testers similar to antifreeze testers that measures the % of DEF in the DEF fluid. Should be 32.5% liquid urea, 67.5% deionized water. That’s been the established spec since day 1 of DEF. 

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33 minutes ago, highcotton said:

Wife’s first cousin has been a powerstroke tech for Ford since the first gen engines. He basically told be the same thing on DEF. fill it up when empty and if you have a piece of jug left throw it away. 

So how do we get away with a 330 gallon tote of it that takes two weeks to use? I know plenty of farms that keep partial 55 gallon totes in the warm shop all winter and use it i. The tractors in the spring.  I realize a pickup won’t go thru it near as fast as semis or tractors and especially combines. 

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1 hour ago, jass1660 said:

Keep jug from freezing and it lasts for a year

How do you keep def in the tank from freezing? 

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