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1945 TD9 Bosch Injection Pump rebuild


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Thank you all for the kind words.  If my adventures can help someone else out there figure out how to fix their machine, it makes it all worth it.  I was hoping to take it for a test drive today, but by the time I got everything back together it was dark.  I also checked and adjusted intake and exhaust valves (which were also way off) while I had the hood off.  I'll fire it up tomorrow and let you all know how it goes.  Fingers crossed.  If anyone needs help doing something like this on their machine and need information, don't hesitate to ask. 

On a related note, it's irritating that you can't find a local shop that will do something that seems so simple.  I know they have to make a buck, but does it really require that much more specialized equipment to run one of these pumps on a stand?

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Necessity is the mother of all invention, and in your case AWESOME and much more! 

And it is not a Heath-Robinson conjunction-perversion of bits 'n pieces!  Well done!

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On 9/20/2021 at 9:39 AM, busted knuckles said:

Just found this Mike. 

 

Aweee......busted knuckles......Fantastic...!!!!!!     that is  exactly what its all about......and because   I   am a ''yesterday's man'' it sure suits me......although not quite a 1912  man.....

Bit out of place on this thread,,,,If we had a coffee shop, this post of yours  would have answered a lot of questions about that billy  tea   thing on my  ''site thingy ''

Thanks !!!!

Mike

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So I got her up and running today.  No issues, other than getting the fuel lines to seal.😒  It has a lot more power.  I was actually able to get it going in 5th gear which I couldn't do before.  Before, it would just stall out on me if i tried.  I'll tell you, that thing cruising along in 5th gear is quite a ride.  I didn't have time to do any real work with it other than make quick work of a 6" pine tree.  It did stall on me trying to go up hill in 3rd gear.  I don't know how much power it is supposed to have, and after 76 year, what should I expect?  Overall, it was certainly worth the effort.  At least now I can expect to do some work with it. 

Once I am finished compiling all my videos into one I will post it and provide the link here.

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On 8/29/2021 at 2:34 PM, td9bcf180 said:

I have the Bosch APE 4A-800 (or 80Q ?) injection pump on my TD9, too.  It runs fine. But I have one bad injector and I thought I could swap out another injector from another motor that has an IH pump.  Top injector in photo is the Bosch. (does it look like yours?) Bottom is the IH. Different animals.  Not sure if I can offer you any good advice, WaldoTD9, as for bench testing a Bosch but from what I am learning, to convert to an IH pump you need lines and different injectors, for what it's worth. (I have the IH parts but going to see this week if any diesel shops can repair/replace my one injector. If not then I guess it's a complete changeover. )

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Could someone please clarify the difference with these injectors? I assembled a TD9 engine using parts from 2 different engines. Both used the IH injection pump. However i used the injectors from the different engine and they look like the yellow ones! I did have the engine running on a stand, haven't installed yet. 

Will the engine function properly? Any advice is appreciated!

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If you had it running on a stand then what is your concern? It shouldn't work any differently once installed.  The injectors don't care what type of pump they are hooked up to as long as it provides the correct pressure. Those are the injectors I have and should open at 700 to 750 psi.

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not seeing difference in photo?

Ih had 90* and 45* line inlet and prior bosch had metric threads needing a mixed line from the various parts

a set of ALL the same design should be calibrated/ok from same engine ID/size

 

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On 9/20/2021 at 8:56 PM, WaldoTD9 said:

what should I expect? 

Depends on the grade of hill but third is a high gear for hill climbing. You should be able to load your blade until you start slipping track to ground a little without stalling.

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That is good info.  I know on my Ford 555 loader I can't climb that particular hill in 4th so I needed some comparison.  I really want to get that thing out and do some work with it but there is always some other distraction, isn't there.

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None of the old crawlers where noted for having big HP  to weight ratio. High gear was called going to the fire gear by many. Many old timers never put them in high  gear. Track wear accelerates at higher ground speed.

 

The old timer test was if it would spin the tracks in low gear.  You had more HP than the machine could put to the ground. A crawler that would spin in 2nd gear would be the talk of the neighborhood.

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40 minutes ago, ray54 said:

None of the old crawlers where noted for having big HP  to weight ratio. High gear was called going to the fire gear by many. Many old timers never put them in high  gear. Track wear accelerates at higher ground speed.

 

The old timer test was if it would spin the tracks in low gear.  You had more HP than the machine could put to the ground. A crawler that would spin in 2nd gear would be the talk of the neighborhood.

Won't   be many years ahead, Ray, when none of the agricultural    work, once done by crawler tractor, will be talked about ,written about or photographed  because  there will no old tractors , in going condition...or no old operators  anyway.....and with the enticement of large wheel tractors, with front driving wheels...good stability   and a quiet cab  with A/C    and a functioning radio........who would want to operate a machine with squeaking tracks, dust floating in one ear...then disappearing out the other....and the bark  of a straight pipe on  a D6   ????......Well  you might.....and I certainly would.....but........It will be like the dinosaurs.....:(

Mike

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I remember that military TD18 that I looked at years ago had a brass tag, top speed was around 9 mph, and yes there had been a lot of previous track frame repairs, can’t imagine the operators having many fillings left😳

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Well Mike here it will go a few more years as vineyards are every billionaires dream it seem in the hills of San Luis Obispo county. Not much flat land mostly New Holland branded and painted Fiats from Italy. But Same's and Lamborghini and other even lesser brands show up for the vineyard work too.

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On 9/22/2021 at 9:26 PM, mike newman said:

Won't   be many years ahead, Ray, when none of the agricultural    work, once done by crawler tractor, will be talked about ,written about or photographed  because  there will no old tractors , in going condition...or no old operators  anyway.....and with the enticement of large wheel tractors, with front driving wheels...good stability   and a quiet cab  with A/C    and a functioning radio........who would want to operate a machine with squeaking tracks, dust floating in one ear...then disappearing out the other....and the bark  of a straight pipe on  a D6   ????......Well  you might.....and I certainly would.....but........It will be like the dinosaurs.....:(

Mike

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I am 36 and I hope, God willing, to be using and talking about my old “junk” for at least a few more years. I’ll keep it patched together as long as I can afford it. I know at least a few younger people like me that love this stuff. 

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On 9/22/2021 at 7:26 PM, mike newman said:

Won't   be many years ahead, Ray, when none of the agricultural    work, once done by crawler tractor, will be talked about ,written about or photographed  because  there will no old tractors , in going condition...or no old operators  anyway.....and with the enticement of large wheel tractors, with front driving wheels...good stability   and a quiet cab  with A/C    and a functioning radio........who would want to operate a machine with squeaking tracks, dust floating in one ear...then disappearing out the other....and the bark  of a straight pipe on  a D6   ????......Well  you might.....and I certainly would.....but........It will be like the dinosaurs.....:(

Mike

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Mike, nice looking 91 Series, those are sweet crawlers.

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12 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

younger people like me that love this stuff. 

I have couple Sons your age that have inherited the Fix It gift and a promising  Grandson. I would like  see Old Iron achieve a status something like a Historical Landmark.  It should be a crime to kill a tractor and stern warnings for neglect. Enough of this nonsense I need to get to work on one now.

Waldo, truly remarkable work on the pump, I don't have one giving me trouble but you make me want to tear one apart anyway.  I salute you 🙂

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Thanks.  It was "fun."  It sure was a lot cheaper and easier than trying to switch over to an IH pump and injectors.  It also gave me some more experience on my lathe making the fittings and such so now I'll know how if I need to tackle something like this in the future.

By the way, I now have a pop tester that I hope I will never have to use again if someone else needs one.  I'd sell it or loan it if someone has a need.

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On 9/24/2021 at 2:43 PM, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I am 36 and I hope, God willing, to be using and talking about my old “junk” for at least a few more years. I’ll keep it patched together as long as I can afford it. I know at least a few younger people like me that love this stuff. 

....Sure....Yes, the crawler will be alive , for years , I hope,in the hands of enthusiasts......What I was trying to say, the days of earning a living , doing Agricultural work, are about over..certainly down here. As Ray said...there are a few doing   vineyard type work...and doing that here...as well  ...But once we headed up into the rolling  country with  bush and bog discs.....Now that once good grass country, is planted in conifers, for either carbon credits ..or ultimately harvesting ,after 25-28   yrs....

I have few pics  of this...a lot on 35mm    slides , that I have yet to turn into  ''computer   friendly ''

Don't know if you have seen this  DFP ,  and I know  Louie 's interest will be piqued   ..!!  Louie..it is a British    TD6, on which I brought two  track frames off a wrecked BTD 6...and extended the four roller frame to  five roller , plus two carrier rollers.....and fitted 16 inch grousers on the extended tracks   With a little   Crawler  like that....the 16inch plates enabled to ''hang up ''  on some very miserable  slope gradients.......

Mike

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8 hours ago, mike newman said:

....Sure....Yes, the crawler will be alive , for years , I hope,in the hands of enthusiasts......What I was trying to say, the days of earning a living , doing Agricultural work, are about over..certainly down here. As Ray said...there are a few doing   vineyard type work...and doing that here...as well  ...But once we headed up into the rolling  country with  bush and bog discs.....Now that once good grass country, is planted in conifers, for either carbon credits ..or ultimately harvesting ,after 25-28   yrs....

I have few pics  of this...a lot on 35mm    slides , that I have yet to turn into  ''computer   friendly ''

Don't know if you have seen this  DFP ,  and I know  Louie 's interest will be piqued   ..!!  Louie..it is a British    TD6, on which I brought two  track frames off a wrecked BTD 6...and extended the four roller frame to  five roller , plus two carrier rollers.....and fitted 16 inch grousers on the extended tracks   With a little   Crawler  like that....the 16inch plates enabled to ''hang up ''  on some very miserable  slope gradients.......

Mike

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I didn’t learn about using crawlers for Ag work until I was older. I never witnessed anything like that or even heard anyone talk about it. It’s not flat where I’m at, just rolling hills. No farmers around here were large enough operators to require big horsepower either. My grandfather told me how great it was when they cut the steel off of the 1936 model “A” John Deere and had rims welded on so they could run rubber tires. The only crawlers around here were used by construction outfits. 

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On 9/22/2021 at 9:26 PM, mike newman said:

..It will be like the dinosaurs.

 My Granddad farmed a quarter section in SE Nebraska he came out of the late 1800s. When Summer came along I would always spend some weeks with him. He was getting pretty old by the time I was old enough to know anything so most his land was tended by a couple of Cousins. Grandpa still kept about 1/2 an acre for a truck garden and when we went out to the farm each day the first thing to do was hoe the garden row by row I walk along behind watching the weed sprouts lifted and set on top in the sun to die. He worked like a machine no noise no smoke no maintenance  just him maintaining the fuel we burn. He still had an old Farmall in the barn but we only used that to tour the field to see how the Cousins were keeping up. I think he really enjoyed the personal contact with his crop.  That was the end of an era Mike,    that old man with a hoe.

We will talk about old characters like he was and you are,  for a long time to come. Thanks doing your part, all of you Ag guys.

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6 hours ago, just Dave said:

 My Granddad farmed a quarter section in SE Nebraska he came out of the late 1800s. When Summer came along I would always spend some weeks with him. He was getting pretty old by the time I was old enough to know anything so most his land was tended by a couple of Cousins. Grandpa still kept about 1/2 an acre for a truck garden and when we went out to the farm each day the first thing to do was hoe the garden row by row I walk along behind watching the weed sprouts lifted and set on top in the sun to die. He worked like a machine no noise no smoke no maintenance  just him maintaining the fuel we burn. He still had an old Farmall in the barn but we only used that to tour the field to see how the Cousins were keeping up. I think he really enjoyed the personal contact with his crop.  That was the end of an era Mike,    that old man with a hoe.

We will talk about old characters like he was and you are,  for a long time to come. Thanks doing your part, all of you Ag guys.

Everyone would still be able to come out to my place and experience the joy of operating a hoe if they hadn’t cancelled my burley tobacco contract. We usually only did it once if at all possible. We quit in 2015, I don’t need anymore experience anyway. Takes quite a while to walk 30 acres. 

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