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brake lines


mmi
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been going around for a month finding some brake lines.

the new coated stuff and ALL the fittings are going bad after 2 years.

trying to find stainless and correct tools + not china steel fittings

one set contains/requires hose, like power steering lines,clearly show on dealer site,but the :"experts "say no such thing

dealer and the BTO suppliers dont have anything < 4 or over 6 yrs

 

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6 hours ago, 79vking said:

COPPER NICKEL BRAKE LINE. AVAILABLE AT MOST AUTO PARTS STORES. COMES IN A ROLL, BENDS NICE, FLARES NICE, DOESN'T RUST! HAVENT LOOKED IF IT COMES IN LARGER SIZES FOR FUEL LINE ETC.

does corrode along with the china "steel" fittings

we did replace all the accessible lines with it 2 years ago (national chain) as OP said.

 

trying to source the lines had an encounter with said employee (10 yrs and self described great at the job) 

the MC lines are similar to PS lines." that is illegal to do" so spent 20 minutes looking for photo to disprove me.

"ohh we cant get or make those" should be solid any how"

Ok just give me some stainless lines in 24" -36"-60"  .."sure thats right here"    .......20' coil of std china steel or painted

clearly marked mild steel china......proceeds to argue that it stainless .

the national chain that makes ss kits also is run by 15 yr olds on a phone.

will not sell just the ones needed and sets include wrong parts

says right on their site advise any modification or changes  (mid year or last run applies)

refused to use the vin and or (lines are made after you order pay)make the lines I want ( front disc/rear drum)

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My sons 03 Chevy 2500 had a brake line go bad by the frame last year. Bought a stainless steel brake line set from Sturdevants auto in Sioux Falls. Not a bad price. No joy to put in. Not that steel would have been cheaper, but I had to chuckle to myself. The pickup has 305,000 miles on it. No matter what the material was. It would be its last set. 

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I put these on my jeep, pre bent are more difficult than you might imagine to install but i am glad to be done doing brake lines for a while. For my own bending pleasure i like the nickel/copper stuff, expensive but well worth while IMO. 
https://classictube.com

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7 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

I put these on my jeep, pre bent are more difficult than you might imagine to install but i am glad to be done doing brake lines for a while. For my own bending pleasure i like the nickel/copper stuff, expensive but well worth while IMO. 
https://classictube.com

I put one of their sets on my '04 GMC. They were no fun at all to change and afterwards you have to have a Tech2 or similar scan tool to bleed the ABS. As I recall the fittings were SS as well.

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7 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

I put these on my jeep, pre bent are more difficult than you might imagine to install but i am glad to be done doing brake lines for a while. For my own bending pleasure i like the nickel/copper stuff, expensive but well worth while IMO. 
https://classictube.com

I did a COMPLETE brake system replacement on my '96 F250 with their complete stainless brake line set about 6 yrs ago. I had a local 1 man shop do all the work, He had a lift, would have saved him lots and lots of time & energy getting out from under the truck. I bought new rear wheel cylinders and front calipers and master cylinder. The shop only charged me for 4 hours of labor so the brake lines must have been an easy install.  I'd already replaced the two plain steel fuel lines and one plain steel power steering line, the ONLY factory line left was the line from the clutch master cylinder to the slave cylinder, and SON and I replaced that about 2 years ago.

    When we replaced the steel fuel lines that ran from the frame up the left front of the engine block, we twisted the arm of the local Ford store parts counter person and got their last set of replacement rubber fuel lines that go IN the Dismal Valley of Eternal Darkness, from the valley mounted fuel pump, regulator to/from fuel filter.  And they lasted only 2-3 years then MASSIVE leak.  SON brought some really good high-temp think it was Eaton brand hose home and we replaced the pump too this time.

   I REALLY wonder why automotive companies don't use stainless or aluminum fluid lines from the factory.

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12 hours ago, mmi said:

does corrode along with the china "steel" fittings

Wow! All the local shops use copper nickle line with great results here in salt land. The line is a more noble metal than a steel fitting so the fitting should be the first to corrode. In fact the line is more noble than just about anything else in the vehicle so should be the only thing left when the rest turns to rust. Since most fittings are plated they should last a long time.

Stainless steel fittings - nuts, etc are available and since they're so close to the copper-nickel on the anodic index there should be little chance of corrosion. When the rest turns to rust the brake lines with the SS nuts will be all that's left.

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10 minutes ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

 I REALLY wonder why automotive companies don't use stainless or aluminum fluid lines from the factory.

I'm with you there! A car should go to the auto graveyard with the original brake and fuel lines!

The same '04 GMC that I installed the SS brake line kit also needed new fuel lines. I think I found aftermarket ones for it and anyway, I knew I wouldn't have the truck for another decade so I wasn't worried about them.

I also replaced the steering lines but more because they were leaking at the crimped hose connection. Sadly it seems you have to do such things to run older equipment.

At the time we had a same year Jeep and Jaguar and their lines were coated and in good shape. Shame on GM to use plain steel.

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5 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

 

   I REALLY wonder why automotive companies don't use stainless or aluminum fluid lines from the factory.

Designers don’t decide what goes on cars, accounting division does. Parts and labor is where manufacturers keep making money off initial sale of vehicles.

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Try looking around the inter web at various speed auto & truck shops. Most sell all the stuff needed to make all your own brake lines. Here's a few I have used in the past and there are others as well. It'll take a bit of searching but keep at it, you'll eventually find what you need and even stuff you didn't know you needed.

https://www.summitracing.com

https://www.speedwaymotors.com/?msclkid=9eda49210cad128f1fda1742f3dec14c

https://www.jegs.com/?creative=76347365054294&device=c&matchtype=b&msclkid=cf56cb31e84a11ef5a1295521466c207&__cf_chl_jschl_tk__=pmd_f322ba2f604039ab69a92ac159f027914441d76b-1629227800-0-gqNtZGzNAjijcnBszRD6

https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/document.asp?DocID=TECH00096

 

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On 8/12/2021 at 11:51 AM, jass1660 said:

Designers don’t decide what goes on cars, accounting division does. Parts and labor is where manufacturers keep making money off initial sale of vehicles.

JASS1660 - I'VE been meaning to ask you,  you PM'd me about Classic Tubular for brake lines for your old Ford,  Did you ever do anything with it?  

     Son's been thinking about putting a mono-beam frt axle on my old F-250, and a rear axle from an F-350 with disk brakes on the rear.  And He's never had any of the fun working with what's already on that truck!  When I decided to re-do the brakes,  all the fittings on the calipers and wheel cylinders were rusted tight, the guy I had do all the work has ALL Snap-On tools,  I figured he could get the old stuff off and put everything new back on. 

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NS

looked at all those, shipping tax fees etc + what they dont have  is more than paying the BTOs for  4 WRONG sets to get the correct parts out of it.

need hose /hard lines on 1.....they argue it is illegal ( just on 20 mil vehicles)not available BC illegal  or ONLY sold in the $> 300 kit.

for the truck there is 10 tight bends in 1 piece 90",and basically for protection needs to FIT.

does not come in the photos sent or kits listed  ( 7  or 14 pc)  I need 10 pc and actually only front 1/2  ,kids cant use vin  therefore dont sell it.   Mind you these are BTO retailers.

need bubble and double flare, so far ALSO no one can say if the $65 SN tool set will work on stainless or if you need the $500> set they peddle with the lines and ridiculous biden shipping.

at another

Catalog is undergoing maintenance. Stick with the website as it is a better resource….use the search box.

told the kid 3x web is useless,does NOT show ANYTHING available,kindly provide a link for x yr/vin if you want $400

was promptly offended !!!

hunt continues

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3 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

JASS1660 - I'VE been meaning to ask you,  you PM'd me about Classic Tubular for brake lines for your old Ford,  Did you ever do anything with it?  

No, getting divorced pretty much took the money away for any restoration project. Jerry

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45 minutes ago, mmi said:

ALSO no one can say if the $65 SN tool set will work on stainless or if you need the $500>

Yes stainless is hard to flare you need the hydraulic flair tool,

Mastercool a company that makes HVAC tools has a good one but its not cheep,

If you want to bend your own lines I would recommend the NiCopp tubing it is easy to work with and a screw type flaring tool will work   

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We have a 1973 (48 years) Dodge Dart.  It still has most of the original brakes lines (except of the flex hoses) on it. Rear end is an 8" from a Ford Maverick same era original lines too. Probably because it has never been salted. Always a Texas car.  New cars are just made so much better and last so much longer!

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On 8/17/2021 at 7:45 PM, jeeper61 said:

Yes stainless is hard to flare you need the hydraulic flair tool,

Mastercool a company that makes HVAC tools has a good one but its not cheep,

If you want to bend your own lines I would recommend the NiCopp tubing it is easy to work with and a screw type flaring tool will work   

no I dont want to make MY own bends (10+ that MUST be very close)

as above the CHINA copper and ALLL !!! the china fittings are going bad after 3K ml 

the stainless kits are 5-80% more and state made on demand from "factory" prints.

in reality they are will/ fit and many are then sourced from CHINA

classic will (at least) on the production end , do it right "IF" I ship to them "factory" intact and still factory bend originals

$180 shipping 

the others ONLY offer what you do not need 13 pc in place of 9pc where I ONLY need 3 " throw out what dont need "adjust the rest as required" DAA....

no one is stepping up to the hose inclusive,use to be hole in wall middle of NO WHERE napa could make those in 10 minutes

Brake Line Primary Image

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On 8/17/2021 at 7:45 PM, jeeper61 said:

Yes stainless is hard to flare you need the hydraulic flair tool,

Mastercool a company that makes HVAC tools has a good one but its not cheep,

 

as ALL vehicles lines are going to be a yearly replacement going forward

that was suggested

if could find domestic SS and fittings would get one

but not at snap off $$$ they all come from Taiwan ,better buy soon

MSL72475.jpg?w=600

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8 hours ago, mmi said:

as ALL vehicles lines are going to be a yearly replacement going forward

that was suggested

if could find domestic SS and fittings would get one

but not at snap off $$$ they all come from Taiwan ,better buy soon

Are you driving around in sulphuric acid? We have some pretty darn nasty stuff on the roads….I certainly don’t have to change brake lines terribly often, and i drive some old stuff… not sure why you dislike the nickel copper stuff, been using it for about 10+ years now, with available stainless nuts and couplings, its corrosion resistance and ease of bending, i don’t see the stainless lines being real practical unless its a restoration authentic look  consideration. 

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10 hours ago, mmi said:

as ALL vehicles lines are going to be a yearly replacement going forward

Copper nickle lines are as close to permanent as you can get. Is it possible that you have some condition where electrical current is passing along the lines causing the unusual corrosion you're seeing? It happens in ships and has happened when the active anti corrosion system was wired backwards and actually caused corrosion. Ships are bathed in an electrolyte. Are you driving on the beach?

https://www.copper.org/applications/automotive/brake-tube/brake.html

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