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Welder ?


Ihfan4life
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I think I might have used the model before that came out with a touch pad.  It worked well had a lot of preprogrammed settings. A lot of stuff that would be useful in a production setting.  My guess is that would be expensive to repair.  If you can get it right I would buy it.  Where I work we have miller 250, 250X and 252.  250X was new in 99.  Getting a little tired so we got the 252 a few years ago.  They just have the wire speed and voltage dials.  They have been durable.  

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2 hours ago, Ihfan4life said:

I’m not sure…

that’s what concerns me about it. 

i am a member at welding web - i did a quick search there, lincoln has stopped support on that welder and they do not carry parts/boards for it anymore. There is no after market company ( from a post/thread from 2016 ) that makes circuit boards for it. You would have to find a company that works on circuit boards and repairs them if you had a problem with the electronics portion. 

Lincoln square wave 255 control board (pcb) - g2150-2 (weldingweb.com)

 

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That's exactly why I sold my Linde migmaster 250. Later bought by esab. No parts, and even liners and consumables were hard to come by unless you adapted a tweco or something to it. I went to go buy the Miller 252 which has proven itself over and over and somehow or another came home with a multimatic 255 multiprocess welder. It's all touch screen and programmable. Very, very nice to weld with but its about as far from what I set out to buy as I could get. Probably regret it in 20 years. Then I bought myself a nice little Lincoln square wave tig welder for tinkering around on aluminum. Couldnt find a multiprocess ac/DC  that covered everything I wanted to do. Basically I use my Miller for spool gun, but mainly mig, and stick. I will admit I have found its limit on wire welding heavy metal. Instead of getting hot the inverter machines just start welding like crap. But I was doing alot of long beads on 1/2" material. Good luck with whatever you buy 

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5 hours ago, Missouri Mule said:

That's exactly why I sold my Linde migmaster 250. Later bought by esab. No parts, and even liners and consumables were hard to come by unless you adapted a tweco or something to it. I went to go buy the Miller 252 which has proven itself over and over and somehow or another came home with a multimatic 255 multiprocess welder. It's all touch screen and programmable. Very, very nice to weld with but its about as far from what I set out to buy as I could get. Probably regret it in 20 years. Then I bought myself a nice little Lincoln square wave tig welder for tinkering around on aluminum. Couldnt find a multiprocess ac/DC  that covered everything I wanted to do. Basically I use my Miller for spool gun, but mainly mig, and stick. I will admit I have found its limit on wire welding heavy metal. Instead of getting hot the inverter machines just start welding like crap. But I was doing alot of long beads on 1/2" material. Good luck with whatever you buy 

That was the welder of choice around here( Miller 252)

This one showed up and got me curious. Lincoln has good welders. The 255, going by nothing more than the numbers, is assumingely more welder than I need and if I was assured of finding parts I’d be all over it. These touchpads was my major concern about this welder. Enough so I’m not willing to take a chance on a 25 year old welder for my limited use of it.

 

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15 hours ago, Ihfan4life said:

That was the welder of choice around here( Miller 252)

This one showed up and got me curious. Lincoln has good welders. The 255, going by nothing more than the numbers, is assumingely more welder than I need and if I was assured of finding parts I’d be all over it. These touchpads was my major concern about this welder. Enough so I’m not willing to take a chance on a 25 year old welder for my limited use of it.

 

you wanting a bigger ( more amps)  mig/wire unit, is that your target? 

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On 8/9/2021 at 10:38 PM, new guy said:

Can you get aprts for the keypad still?

I like my powermig with just the 2 dials for setting. Hasn't missed a weld in over 20 years.

I have a 100 amp Century that I bought in high school , in ‘81. Has something like a 20% duty cycle that was frequently pushed to 100%... plus all sorts of physical abuse pushing it around the shop.... quit on me 2 times: both days it was about 95* F outside. I pulled the trigger and it just made a sort of groaning sound, and I thought, “ well, I finally smoked it. “  It cooled off and next day it was back to normal. 
 I attempted to upgrade to a Lincoln about 20 years newer, but the cooling fan sounded like a siren compared to the Century, and I hated it. For a lesser known classic, it sure is a good little welder.

   

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2 hours ago, searcyfarms said:

you wanting a bigger ( more amps)  mig/wire unit, is that your target? 

My welder is an old tombstone Lincoln I bought new in 1984. AC only.

Looking to get into a wire feed welder, but not looking to spend the money for a new welder. Not that I need to weld much of anything these days. 

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I have 2 buzz box lincolns AC only, and what I learned on. I can weld like crazy with 7014s in those. 

I got a Lincoln 210mp last yr, does DC stick only, mig, you can use it for tig, its a scratch start only is my understanding. It will take an aluminum spool gun also. 

I have a Lincoln 250 idealarc, AC/DC tombstone and while its a much better welder, its so freaking big heavy i find myself reaching for the smaller unit most of the time. 

Its on a trike so not too bad to move around but dang the cables are heavy. 

Im on the fence regarding mig, have to have a pristine environment to use it, clean metal, no wind, dry, no rust, blah blah unless of course you are using flux core wire which in my opinion you may as well be using stick. I am sure the REAL welders like @bitty@Finney and others i dont know about would be much more inclined to provide a better experience than my farm welder prowess but I find myself leaning more to stick than mig for those very reasons. 

No denying they make prettier welds, no denying they make better looking end products. Each has its drawback of course. I use my mig more on thin stuff, outside of that stick is my go to. Especially for anything farm related for a quick fix or rusty repair so I can keep working. 

I dont like the mig inability to get up into corners/small areas as easy either, stick will go there just fine. 

thats my 2 cents FWIW 

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19 hours ago, Ihfan4life said:

My welder is an old tombstone Lincoln I bought new in 1984. AC only.

Looking to get into a wire feed welder, but not looking to spend the money for a new welder. Not that I need to weld much of anything these days. 

If you can find a Miller 252 for reasonable money you'll be happy with it. I figure they've made so many of them that support will always be there. My stick welder has sat unused for years since I got mine.

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I run all Lincoln welders the older ones seem to last for ever I have a ideal arc 250 with a LN -7 wire feeder that is a 1979 never been apart the newer machines with all the electronics seem to have more problems just like newer trucks and equipment

One thing that helps, we take the tin work off and blow them out every 6 months  The reps told me years ago that that will pay off in the long run

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From what I understand, if you're considering an engine driven welder, go for the Lincoln 260 (it's much quieter) than the 225 or 250 or the comparable Miller. Both use the same Kohler eng. Unsure about the non eng driven welders like I think you are referring to hence the nomenclature 255. Miller or Lincoln, whatever you choose, get Stick, MIG, TIG capable, as well as Steel, Stainless & Aluminum (each require different gasses) you won't be sorry you did. Go more than you expect to use. Ifn you don't have the horsepower, you can't use it when you need it!

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8 hours ago, m.c.farmerboy said:

One thing that helps, we take the tin work off and blow them out every 6 months  The reps told me years ago that that will pay off in the long run

That and fit some force air furnace filters to the openings..............I got them in my ESAB's, put them inside with double sided tape, when they start to look black from the outside time to change/blow them out and start over.  The amount of crap in the air entering those poor machines is amazing.  Also the same goes for blowing out grinders.............they sure last alot longer.  All that crap in the air is abrasive on stuff, makes sense to blow it out unless you like sand paper working on everything inside.

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I really like my Miller wire feed, and I seldom use either of the stick welders. Every now and again I need to do some truly big stuff and will dig out the old crank Miller stick welder. It great for big heavy jobs, but for day to day stuff, I like the convenience of the wire feed.

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