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IH DC-3


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Dad passed away in march of this year. While going through his belongings I came across this card. I remember dad telling me that he along with his father rode the DC-3 from MSP to MEM and back. As I recall the story my grandfather sold a certain amount of hay balers that won him a free trip to the factory in Memphis TN. My grandpa was always called "tractor grandpa " so we would not confuse him with my other grandpa. Grandpa's dealership was called Fratzke's in Watertown MN. Phone 955-1901. I was 4 months old at the time according to the date.

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Holy cow! Those are my two favorite things: IH and the DC-3!!!!!!!! I didn't know there was an IH DC-3. I'm not at all surprised, but I had never heard of it.

I actually think I love the plane more. It was the greatest airplane ever built in my opinion. I once traveled to Yellowknife, NWT just to fly one of the few survivors!

 

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Very cool 

I wonder if the COE's flew in that or the had another plane?

One of my father's friends from the air force flew the hump in C-47s

Got to chat with him a few times at dad's in Fl when he came to visit.

He had some stories I am glad I was able to hear them before he passed.

 

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That is awesome. I never realized IH owned a DC-3. Back in the 1990’s I flew on a C-47 (DC-3) owned by the Yankee Air Force out of Willow Run Airport inYpsilanti,  Michigan. You could buy a flight on their C-47, at that time it was named Yankee Doodle Dandy. They sold early morning flights from Willow Run Airport to WPAFB in Dayton, Ohio, where you spent the day at the U.S. Air Force Museum, and then returned to Willow Run on the C-47. Since then, their C-47 has been overhauled, and currently goes by it’s new name, “Hairless Joe”. I was glad to have had the chance to fly on such a historic aircraft. I can’t believe it’s been that long ago already. 

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......at the age of twelve  years old....  (1954 )  I went on the ubiquitous    DC3  from Nelson  ,   South Island   to Whangarei    , in the top of the North Island of NZ...I remember the flight well.....for two reasons.....my dear Mother had placed  a cardboard card around my neck.....with my name on it,,,,,that caused me acute   embarrassment....and..naturally, I spewed up into the brown paper bag, provided for liitle boys with tags around the neck....and who had eaten to much ice cream.....:blush:

That flight today, would be an enthusiasts  delight....it was a sort of a mail run, stopping at  four airports  on the journey before the final stop.....

Mike

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2 hours ago, JEAN COINTE FRANCE said:

Predecessor corporate plane (Boeing ?) B23 © WHS Pilot supposed to be Harold  Mac Cormick

1508027_471897596243564_1049138723_n.jpg

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b 23 2.jpg

Made by Douglas. They built 39 of them as a possible replacement for the B18 but the Air Corps was not impressed enough to buy any more.

I worked for Jenney Flight engineering and we operated one. Most of the B23s were converted to corporate planes like the IHC plane. The one we operated had been Rexall Drug company's plane then was converted to a flight test plane for LFE Laboratory for Electronics. Jenney bought the operation from LFE.

Hanscom Field was a hotbed of military avionics development and Raytheon, MIT, and others were developing all sorts of stuff that needed to fly. The B23 had most of the seats removed and replaced with radio racks and the engines had 400 amp generators to run the huge motor/generator inverters to supply 400 hz and 60 hz AC.

The field was alive with A26s, T33s, F94s and the like in the '50s and '60s into the '70s. MIT is the only one left but still going strong running a 707 and a couple of Falcon 20s, one being an HU25 Coast Guard plane, and a bunch of piston planes. All hush hush.

I found our old B23 at the Castle Air Museum. The Air Force was in the process of turning it back to original when the base closed so it's partially restored and resting in the sun.

B23 then.jpg

IMG_2244.jpg

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14 hours ago, Red Flyer said:

Dad passed away in march of this year. While going through his belongings I came across this card. I remember dad telling me that he along with his father rode the DC-3 from MSP to MEM and back. As I recall the story my grandfather sold a certain amount of hay balers that won him a free trip to the factory in Memphis TN. My grandpa was always called "tractor grandpa " so we would not confuse him with my other grandpa. Grandpa's dealership was called Fratzke's in Watertown MN. Phone 955-1901. I was 4 months old at the time according to the date.

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Too cool and a great piece of memorabilia.

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16 hours ago, Red Flyer said:

. I remember dad telling me that he along with his father rode the DC-3

Wonderful memories. My Dad worked for Douglas before the war, I think it was in Boston, then with TWA in 1946. I never got to fly in one, It was the Connie for me first.

 

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B23 was faster due R2600 engines v R1830s or R1820 but much smaller fuselage. Wing span about the same as the wing was very much like the DC3, just held, I think 1600 gallons and had some flush riveting and likely somewhat stronger. Landing gear looks just like a C47 gear, tail wheel offset for access to the tail gunner's position. Tail gun was first in US; the gunner had to be slim as I couldn't fit down there when I was 160lb, a number I haven't seen for decades.

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There are still several operating in Western Arctic in northern Canada .A couple have been retrofitted with PT6, turbines .Some other mods as well ,tail plane lowered ,is one of the mods .Expensive ,about $1,000,000 per side when done  nearly  20 odd years  ago.Made them into an even better workhorse,faster ,more efficient  and the main thing much easier starting in the sub zero temps .In the late seventies ,we were crew changing  out of some of the DEW Line  sites  on the Arctic coast(we were working offshore in the Beaufort sea on drill ships)  One day we were waiting at a very windy site ,and the DC3 was due in to pick us up to go south.The aircraft came in and I remarked to one of the other mechanics that he was coming in hot and  using an awful lot of runway.The plane disappeared in the  distance as the runway sloped slightly down hill at that point.After a considerable time had gone by,we noticed two figures,trudging disconsolately up the runway towards us,sadder and wiser. The reason for the higher speed than normal landing was due to a down wind component they hadnt noticed or werent aware of .They had run out of runway , brakes and ideas all about the same time ,consequently  another DC3 was required to finish the job as theirs was "broken". Oddly enough ,we never saw that crew again.We used those old birds lots  in the early days in the diamond exploreration  programmes as well .  Great old birds . on a side note, in New Englanders post ,I noticed the old Sikorsky S55 (H19 Chickasaw ) parked next to the DC3. I used to crop spray with one of those years ago.

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16 hours ago, JEAN COINTE FRANCE said:

Predecessor corporate plane (Boeing ?) B23 © WHS Pilot supposed to be Harold  Mac Cormick

 

10151804_472076589558998_1230434943_n.jpg

 

The B-23 was acquired in 1947 and was named the Harold F McCormick as can be seen on the nose of the plane.  McCormick was the IH president at the time but he was not the pilot although most likely the primary passenger. The crew was Pilot William R. Dotter and Co-Pilot Walter Daiber per a Harvester World magazine.

In 1955, IH operated 2 DC-3s and 2 Beech D-18s.

The Aviation Department was eliminated sometime around 1960 with IH then using chartered planes and commercial flights.


 

 

 

IH Aviation Department 3, Harvester World Mar Apr 1955 (1).jpg

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20 hours ago, JEAN COINTE FRANCE said:

Predecessor corporate plane (Boeing ?) B23 © WHS Pilot supposed to be Harold  Mac Cormick

1508027_471897596243564_1049138723_n.jpg

10151804_472076589558998_1230434943_n.jpg

b 23 2.jpg

Sure looks like a Boeing rudder.

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A D18 Beach went down about 4 blocks from our house in NJ back in the late 60's. No survivors. One of my school teachers husband was supposed to be on that flight but got to the field just in time to watch it go in right after takeoff. Was late cause his son who was supposed to drive him to the field overslept. SCared the crap out of me cause my dad flew out of that field about once every 6 weeks.

 

Rick 

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6 hours ago, Steve C. said:

Sure looks like a Boeing rudder.

Here's a DC4/C54 pic. We always thought that the B23 tail looked similar to to DC4 rather than the DC3  with which it had more things in common: airfoil, main and tail wheel gear, wing attach angle construction, etc.

C54.jpg

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14 hours ago, Pukeko said:

I noticed the old Sikorsky S55 (H19 Chickasaw )

Jenney had two of them also used for some projects but there was not much need for helicopters for testing avionics so they were sold, taking their grease fittings with them.

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With the tail number visible, can these planes still be tracked to see if they are still in service?

Where is Randy Sohn when we need him?

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23 minutes ago, Diesel Doctor said:

With the tail number visible, can these planes still be tracked to see if they are still in service?

Where is Randy Sohn when we need him?

If you enter the tail number into a Google search, it can usually find something.

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12 hours ago, Howard_P said:

The B-23 was acquired in 1947 and was named the Harold F McCormick as can be seen on the nose of the plane.  McCormick was the IH president at the time but he was not the pilot although most likely the primary passenger. The crew was Pilot William R. Dotter and Co-Pilot Walter Daiber per a Harvester World magazine.

In 1955, IH operated 2 DC-3s and 2 Beech D-18s.

The Aviation Department was eliminated sometime around 1960 with IH then using chartered planes and commercial flights.


 

 

 

IH Aviation Department 3, Harvester World Mar Apr 1955 (1).jpg

If anyone is interested, I found the article that photo is in. https://content.wisconsinhistory.org/digital/collection/ihc/id/38248 The article goes to page 17.

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