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Electric Cub Cadet


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I recently posted about how Im having engine trouble with my Ingersol lawn tractor.

Ive thought about buying a new one as Im getting really sick of fixing stuff.

I looked at new Cadets online and saw that they make an all-electric now.  Anybody here have one or know much about them?

We have a fairly large lawn with a lot of obstacles (trees, bushes and old implements that my wife thinks save me mowing time because they take up lawn space but really dont because of all the stupid turns I have to make to mow around them.  It takes me a good two hours to cut it all.

It certainly sounds nice to not have to run to the station for gas or change oil or deal with the deadaches of small gas engines.  But are there things that I should know about this?

Comments?

https://www.cubcadet.com/en_US/riding-lawn-mowers/electric-riding-mowers?gclid=CjwKCAjw87SHBhBiEiwAukSeUfV-yo2PUwzSgXhM0xvKAqIjxWfGw7hnz2PhgM0P3coWI2j5SftS1BoCYqMQAvD_BwE

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I’ve heard good things about the new cup cadet gas zero turn and for $500 more I get the zero turn over the rider  because you can get that much more done faster. Can you mow all your lawn in 2 hours ?

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6 minutes ago, Wi Ih said:

I’ve heard good things about the new cup cadet gas zero turn and for $500 more I get the zero turn over the rider  because you can get that much more done faster. Can you mow all your lawn in 2 hours ?

Im going to the local dealer today but I doubt he has any in stock.  I really like the idea of low maintenance.  No pulleys or belts either!  I wonder what happens when the blades jam up tho.

Hey, two hours is enough!

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What happens when the batteries are no good? How expensive are they to replace?

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2 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

What happens when the batteries are no good? How expensive are they to replace?

Good question.  I imagine they have a swap out available.  Batteries have a 4 year warrantee.  3 on the tractor.

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I just ask because I have read this is a big problem/expense on electric cars.

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7 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

I just ask because I have read this is a big problem/expense on electric cars.

Its a legitimate question.  Last year we bought a new Ford Ranger and while I love it Im now looking at the new 150 Lightening.  It costs pennies on the dollar to run over the gas version and has no engine so the front compartment is a "FRUNK" a front trunk with a base price that isnt far off from my Ranger.  Over a couple years you can pay for the batteries pretty easily of not sooner and they do do a swap out and then recycle them.

Whether the same economy holds up with this is hard to say since the total fuel consumption is going to be a lot less so maybe less payback.

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29 minutes ago, oldtech said:

I wonder what happens when the blades jam up tho.

 

Do you jamb up your mower blades on stuff a lot? With careful use by the operator, that shouldn’t be a big issue. Don’t mow over high protruding rocks, tree stumps or roots, posts sticking up out of the ground, big mounds of earth, etc. 

Maybe the machine has some sort of built in safety cut off or circuit breaker type of set up to the blades just in case you jamb up the blades. Your dealer should know or check a operator manual. 

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Rick G. said:

Do you jamb up your mower blades on stuff a lot? With careful use by the operator, that shouldn’t be a big issue. Don’t mow over high protruding rocks, tree stumps or roots, posts sticking up out of the ground, big mounds of earth, etc. 

Maybe the machine has some sort of built in safety cut off or circuit breaker type of set up to the blades just in case you jamb up the blades. Your dealer should know or check a operator manual. 

 

 

 

This place is a mine field!  Especially when my wife leaves her garden hoses out.

I also have to push the limits to mow all the cockleburs which infest this place.  I spray, chop and mow but I just cant kill them all.

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Sort of like an HP inkjet printer. The printer is sold very cheaply because they make the profit on the ink. Same with color laser jet, a $400. printer requires  $350. toner cartridges.  In the first 6 months of ownership. 

The batteries currently cost thousands of dollars, if they have any real capacity.  

STRANGE is the fact that all the folks are willing to invest in  electrics with no proven record at all.  Will someone please purchase a new Mustang and verify that it will go from Shreveport to El Paso at Texas freeway speeds  without several overnight stays for recharging.  AND how many recharge cycles and batteries does it actually require to get 100,000 miles on it.

If someone will GIVE me one and pay for the recharge bills, I am willing to test it.

 

 

 

 

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GENERAL ELECTRIC made the all electric ELECTRAC GARDEN TRACTOR between 1969 to 1975. All attachments were run with electricity.  TP knows a lot about them,  maybe he will post about them.

     I bought spare belts for my Cub Cadet zero turn, one was $80, other was $100.  Both aramid fiber belts,  I don't clean fallen branches / limbs like I should and I've chopped some pretty good sized limbs down into mulch sized bits, that's a pretty good shock load to a belt with 27 hp motivating the blade.  But half way thru year #6, 217+ hours and the belts show absolutely no wear.

    I'm not ever planning on jumping on the electric car/truck/lawnmower bandwagon all for the same reason.  Wife & I drove non-stop from Charleston, SC to Madison, WI. over 16 hours and almost 1100 miles. Only stopping for gas 4 times and something to eat once. That trip would have taken a couple days with an electric car.  Just like the day I mowed and vacuumed leaves in the yard one Veteran's Day. Started about Noon, finished and unloaded the last load about 1 AM the next morning. Between the 10 hp Kohler in the Cub Cadet tractor and the 8 hp Kohler on the vacuum I burned between 15 & 20 gallons of gas.  With 2 hours of run time per charge it would take a week or two to do that with an electric tractor.  With today's battery technology they have not got the run time to come close to today's gasoline or diesel powered equipment.

      I don't think the durability of the equipment is a concern, IF the limitations of it's short period of operation between rechargings is acceptable.  If the electric zero-turn can run 2 hours, or get your mowing done within it's run time, you should be happy.

    I've seen half a DOZEN articals on-line about what the limitations with today's electric cars & trucks are.  Hunt one up and read it.

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I looked into Hybrid cars.   It takes at least 3 years of typical driving to pay back the upcharge.   One good thing I did not know is that the g'vmt requires the auto mfg to warrantee the batteries for 100,000 miles, and most cars easily exceed that.   I looked at a Honda that had 150K on it, and still worked fine.   Then I looked at replacement costs - the Honda was $14000 to replace the batteries, and it would not move at all if they failed!!!   So - electric/hybrid - buy new and trade off at 100K.

I think the new battery technology might work nice in a lawnmower.  Quiet for sure.   Make sure you don't "run out of charge" on the back 40!   What I don't like is the electrical connections & controllers on a machine with dead grass laying all over it.   Electric drive systems create heat....similar to a combustion engine sometimes.

I will say I really like my X-mark DIESEL Zero turn lawnmower.    We went from 6 hours using 2 riding mowers, to 3 hours using the X-mark alone.   It really was that much faster.    And I mow 2 times between fillups---at the no-tax farm fuel tank.

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Read a short article on electric cars the other day. Now they were really talking hybrids because they said owners reported they went about 25 miles before the aux engine kicked in. Plus they were talking about charge times of 10 plus hours over night. Article claimed true cost per mile of .74 versus .08 per mile for gas. Plus the upcharge of the new etc compared to gas. Idk just what I saw. Agree with Doc tho if you can mow your yard within limits of 1 batt charge you will probably be happy. At least until batteries need replaced then who knows.

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I had a GE Elec-Trac for several years back in the 70s.  It would mow most of my 3/4 A lot, but I often had a strip or two that had to wait till the next day because it could no longer spin the blades.  At least, with the mower turned off, it would drive back to the barn to recharge overnight.  Other than that, I really liked it and I had a second lot that I would let get quite long before I mowed it and the mower handled it ok.  But thinking about someday replacing those batteries made me sell it before that became necessary.

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8 hours ago, oleman said:

Sort of like an HP inkjet printer. The printer is sold very cheaply because they make the profit on the ink. Same with color laser jet, a $400. printer requires  $350. toner cartridges.  In the first 6 months of ownership. 

The batteries currently cost thousands of dollars, if they have any real capacity.  

STRANGE is the fact that all the folks are willing to invest in  electrics with no proven record at all.  Will someone please purchase a new Mustang and verify that it will go from Shreveport to El Paso at Texas freeway speeds  without several overnight stays for recharging.  AND how many recharge cycles and batteries does it actually require to get 100,000 miles on it.

If someone will GIVE me one and pay for the recharge bills, I am willing to test it.

 

The recharge costs are less than a third of gas per mile challenged for cars.

Batteries do cost quite a bit.  For a Tesla its between $3000 and $7000 depending on model.

BUT it is rated for a minimum of 300,000 miles

https://www.forbes.com/sites/brookecrothers/2021/05/22/rising-gas-prices-driving-you-to-an-electric-car-cost-to-charge-a-tesla-model-3-vs-gas/?sh=1b45dfa87192

 

 

8 hours ago, oleman said:

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Howard_P said:

I had a GE Elec-Trac for several years back in the 70s.  It would mow most of my 3/4 A lot, but I often had a strip or two that had to wait till the next day because it could no longer spin the blades.  At least, with the mower turned off, it would drive back to the barn to recharge overnight.  Other than that, I really liked it and I had a second lot that I would let get quite long before I mowed it and the mower handled it ok.  But thinking about someday replacing those batteries made me sell it before that became necessary.

Well I agree that batteries are expensive but the fuel usage is much cheaper.  And those back in the 70s were not the same lithium batteries we have now.

My drill is a black and decker and those are basically the same thing just smaller.  I have yet to have one go bad and I can drill half a day before they need charging and they are at full power in 20 minutes.

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Yup, grandfather and old man were Elec Trak men................Grandfather bought one new, old man bought a acouple used...........Had a E20, E15, and E12 here at one time or another.  Had the front mount mower, snow blade, snow blower, rear tiller, weight box, and some hand held attachments that would plug in.  Honestly, for the time they were built they did work quite well, the major issue was batteries of the time were lacking.  Our last one my old man put in new ones, and when they were going that is when he wanted to sell everything as we had a bunch of gas stuff by that time and it wasn't used much.  At the time I didn't care, but now I wish he would have kept that E15 and all that attachments.  A guy from Delaware drove up and paid a considerable amount for everything at that time, and he was tickled, mostly because of the tiller which was in great shape, but I guess they were scarce?  As years have gone by I can only wonder had it stayed and could have put optima or some other good deep cycle batteries in it these days, how well it would have worked.  It was great as a kid mowing grass, was quiet and got around well.  Alot of days I miss it, but also miss the 6 spd Sears GT-18 with the Onan, Old Cream Gravely, well you get the idea............I guess I should be happy with what is still here, although I don't use those anymore either.:lol:

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ive rented escape hybrids, focus hybrid, tahoe hybrid, prius, volt, cmax energy, and here are my thoughts

2mpg better on the escape, 2 to 2.5 mpg better on the focus - vs their gasser counter parts on the same drives/roads

1mpg better on the tahoe hybrid 

prius, nothing to really compare it or the cmax to, they were meh, wouldnt own either just didnt like them or the volt - very cheap made

lawn mowers and batteries - LION battries are 6 to 8 yrs batteries 

most lions will last about 1 yrs at 90 to 95% cap

2 yrs about 85 to 90

3 yrs about  80 to 85, you get the drift until they are pretty much down to around 50% and most people are done with that life cycle and want new batteries so break out the chk book!!! 

set of batteries for a prius are 12 to 14K - you can get aftermarket folks to do them for 8 to 10K i have heard vs dealer. not sure if true

my sister bought her first electric lawn mower, its 4yrs old, it runs half as long on the same yard, so she just bought another one over the 4th becuase she couldnt get her yard done in one mowing w/out a recharge - this is a lil push mower and a small 1/2 acre lot in town not much to mow so that is not acceptable. 

dads 81, talked him into a zero turn in 2010, its been literally chg oil, sharpen blades, mow again, i helped him chg hydro oil once in that time its due again 

it has 7 or 800 hours on it, he will never go back to a diff mower. easy on/off, easy to chg oil/battery and clean out deck 

 

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I think the day is coming that gas vehicles are going to be obsolete.  

Somehow my response to oleman got muddled so Im reposting this link.  The battery life and relative fuel cost are being grossly underestimated here.  Little push lawn mowers are not made to the same standards as the cars.  If I didnt already have my Ranger Id have an order in for a 150 Lightening now.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/brookecrothers/2021/05/22/rising-gas-prices-driving-you-to-an-electric-car-cost-to-charge-a-tesla-model-3-vs-gas/?sh=1b45dfa87192

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17 hours ago, Rick G. said:

Do you jamb up your mower blades on stuff a lot? With careful use by the operator, that shouldn’t be a big issue. Don’t mow over high protruding rocks, tree stumps or roots, posts sticking up out of the ground, big mounds of earth, etc. 

Maybe the machine has some sort of built in safety cut off or circuit breaker type of set up to the blades just in case you jamb up the blades. Your dealer should know or check a operator manual.

100% there is an overload breaker built in for blade-stopping obstacles. It would have to. The alternative is burned out motors, wiring, electrical fires... Most likely it is less stressful on the machine and safer overall than slipping the belts and/or stalling the engine.

I love it how everyone assumes the engineers are completely brain-dead. They make mistakes yes. Don't you? They think of most everything though, especially in this day and age where you get sued over looking at someone wrong, and Internet giving people a platform to complain about every little thing.

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16 hours ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

I looked into Hybrid cars.   It takes at least 3 years of typical driving to pay back the upcharge.   One good thing I did not know is that the g'vmt requires the auto mfg to warrantee the batteries for 100,000 miles, and most cars easily exceed that.   I looked at a Honda that had 150K on it, and still worked fine.   Then I looked at replacement costs - the Honda was $14000 to replace the batteries, and it would not move at all if they failed!!!   So - electric/hybrid - buy new and trade off at 100K.

I think the new battery technology might work nice in a lawnmower.  Quiet for sure.   Make sure you don't "run out of charge" on the back 40!   What I don't like is the electrical connections & controllers on a machine with dead grass laying all over it.   Electric drive systems create heat....similar to a combustion engine sometimes.

I will say I really like my X-mark DIESEL Zero turn lawnmower.    We went from 6 hours using 2 riding mowers, to 3 hours using the X-mark alone.   It really was that much faster.    And I mow 2 times between fillups---at the no-tax farm fuel tank.

Not to high jack the thread but how is the ride on the x-mark? My yard is pretty rough.

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Run time is the biggest thing on a full battery mower. If you can cut all you need to on one charge, you will probably be happy with it. And, of course a dealership with a good service department.  They do have parts that fail and diagnosis can be a challenge. In my experience with a Green Machine 36" walk behind, a JD electric gator, many Stihl branded cordless, and some Miles electric cars, the overall cost of ownership is 2-3 times the comparable gas unit.

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5 minutes ago, yellowrosefarm said:

Run time is the biggest thing on a full battery mower. If you can cut all you need to on one charge, you will probably be happy with it. And, of course a dealership with a good service department.  They do have parts that fail and diagnosis can be a challenge. In my experience with a Green Machine 36" walk behind, a JD electric gator, many Stihl branded cordless, and some Miles electric cars, the overall cost of ownership is 2-3 times the comparable gas unit.

On the subject of dealers, our small local Cadet dealer says they wont be selling them as they have to go thru special training for them and install a charging station.  Given that one of the original owners recently died it will probably never happen there.

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I knew an Engineer a few years back he had a Tesla 6 I think it was. He worked for a major firm that had charge ports at work. He said that when he was off for a couple weeks charging at home he would notice a significant bump in the bill. There is no cheep or free electricity and we could see the cost rise a good bit as we retire the old coal fired plants. I was running Mechanical Maintenance at one of them when I retired in 2017. That plant was built in the 70s for 192 million $. At the time I left we were just finishing a 300 million $ renovation (basically a filter for our exhaust) that would allow us to stay open a few more years. How many, no guarantee. So big batteries big charge cost.

On the other hand I have a DeWalt 36V weed eater I will choose for all but the woody stuff. A snap in/out battery is the key to avoiding delays. I have heard that universal automobile batteries that are quick change are in development...... I will wait for that.

That Tesla was I think 10 years old at the time and he told me the battery was still at about 80%

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3 hours ago, jingles1928 said:

Not to high jack the thread but how is the ride on the x-mark? My yard is pretty rough.

No different than any other mower - you sit right over the drive wheels.  My X-Mark is a "front mount" not a midmount like all the new ones.  The old JD 314 was worse if any thing.  And my yard was an old cow pasture - sometimes you gotta slow down to keep from bouncing out of the seat!   The lawn tractors were the same.   There are some mowers with springs on the seats, I know an guy with back problems who bought a Cadet years ago because the seat had some springs under it.   Helped enough he could keep mowing a few more years.

This is a good point though - I've often wished that the mower mfg's would add suspension to the seats on the mowers - It would be pretty easy to put a low-profile air or spring suspension on the X-Mark.   I suppose its all $$$.    Keeping your tires at proper pressure (10 not 20+ psi) helps the ride a lot.

I really agree with Searcy - the X-Mark has been great to work on and maintain.   Tilt up the deck, sharpen the blades, and go.   10 minute job.

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