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NH stack wagon


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I have with a 1034. Sure beats loading by hand. Hills can be tricky, u have to load going uphill and when going downhill you need to have the second table up to prevent the bales from falling forward.i am from the mountains so my version of hills are steeper than some. They do not like to load hay after the sun goes down and the dew starts to fall the bales get tacky and won't slide. 

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I am considering replacing my kicker racks with a stack wagon as I am tired of getting 15 bales so bent out of shape that they need to be re-baled to be presentable. Accumulator grapples are out because of lack of loader tractors or skid loaders and cost. 

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yup we had one years ago when we bought the farm here in Canada. It was ok at first but for it being left outside before we had it the trouble seemed to start every time when there was a dark cloud comin lol. We did lots of loads the switched to round bales. In the old country we put all the hay up loose! When ya do get one look to get one that was shedded or a newer model, a view weeks ago there was a nice small stacker for sale in my area though.

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We run two 1037 stackers, love them.  We usually run 2 bakers and 2 stackers, with everything running and a 2 mile haul, we can bale 450 an hour and haul about 600 an hour. We have flat ground and the 966 is a great match for hp, but the 65 hp case 830 handles it nicely also. Everything is mechanical, so easy to work on, but best if stored indoors to keep linkages from rusting. We have put 300k bales through the original and probably 35k bales through the second and had minimal problems. 

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West of Midland TX, into the southeast corner of NM, the Carlsbad-Artesia area, they very common. Mostly flat, to slightly rolling land. Seems the biggest challenge is unloading under shelter(pole building or roof). Have noticed the stack starts to lean, and guys have long boards/poles to wedged into the side of the stack to prevent the outside bales from falling over. 
The ones I have seen were all tractor pulled, have not noticed any self propelled.

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My uncle had a self propelled one years ago, as he had fields several miles from the farm. I don’t know anything about it, other than he used it for years until he switched to round bales. Never heard him complain about it. 

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I like my 1010 alright. It takes a minute to get used to the pickup & the feeling of turning a semi trailer as the wheels are waaaay back there. Mine only has a 56 bale capacity & would recommend something with a lot more capacity if you are going to tackle 80 acres of hay. This year I'm using the 560 on it. It does a good job, but I prefer it on the 806 due to a heavier drawbar & better gear selection. One other thing to consider is ground moisture. The ends of the nice, dry bales like to sop it up while sitting there waiting to be picked up. That can cause issues when loading/unloading the Stackliner & may be a problem in the mow or stack depending on how wet they are.

Mike

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The older self propelled wagons were underpowered and the brakes werent the greatest. They use a fair amt of pull types around me. Lot of moving parts that have to be adjusted to work in syncronization.  Folks seem to go to a grapple system now. Less money and less to maintain. I got a old 1048 in the yard that needs repower and a little TLC.Selling cheap

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Question For all of you that have used them, I have been told they don't like, whether it be won't pickup, or stack well , the lighter bales? Was this just someone who didn't have it adjusted properly, or is there truth to it?  I would very much enjoy the idea of getting one, but might be changing over to big rounds. 

Mark

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5 minutes ago, td9inidaho said:

Question For all of you that have used them, I have been told they don't like, whether it be won't pickup, or stack well , the lighter bales? Was this just someone who didn't have it adjusted properly, or is there truth to it?  I would very much enjoy the idea of getting one, but might be changing over to big rounds. 

Mark

Only NH bale wagons we’ve had is a 1047, 1069, and our current 1049.  They don’t like banana shaped loose string bales.  When we got our first NH bale wagon we did some stacking around the neighborhood and the bales that gave us problems was bales out of NH balers.  They work better with dense brick shaped bales because they will fall apart from the man handling of the machine.  

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I have a 1036. I prefer 2 wide. You definitely have to bale for the wagon. Mine are 42 long to make a good tie. My baler is a 14". I tie 4th and 6th, on the first dump, 6 is a reverse tie.

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I have picked up many bales with 1032 wagons. Definitely don’t work as well on hilly ground. There are adjustments for bale length. Light bales can be finicky but not bad. Make sure to check linkages for wear and frame for cracks. If your barns are set up for them and you don’t have a super long haul they work really well.

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