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Cultivator sweeps


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The recent threads on cultivators reminded me.  You used to be able to get Left & Right sweeps for the row crop cultivators....where the one wing was removed.  Supposedly let you get closer to the row.   I still have a few of these in a bucket bought on an auction some years ago.....but I would like to buy some new ones.   I tried torching off the wing of some CIH Earthmetal sweeps - and almost half of them have broken up thru the bolts.  (This may also be because of 28% nitrogen being pumped in under the sweep.   The breaks look like the metal just shatters.  I think there must be some chemical thing going on....as only those shovels break.)

Anybody still supply these?

I plan to rework my Glencoe cultivator/applicator this year.   New injector tubes, new shovels where needed, new hoses, new press wheels, & new "open center" rolling shields I designed.   Be nice to get the shovels at the same time.

 

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Sounds almost like the temper of the metal was changed due to the torch heat. That would possibly make the sweeps more brittle. Might not be the case but is possible. 

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2 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Sounds almost like the temper of the metal was changed due to the torch heat. That would possibly make the sweeps more brittle. Might not be the case but is possible. 

I Also Needed those Sweeps,   I use a 4 1/2 cut off wheel,   Experienced the same problem with a cutting torch Modified Sweep.

Jim Droscha

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21 minutes ago, DroschaFamilyDairy said:

I Also Needed those Sweeps,   I use a 4 1/2 cut off wheel,   Experienced the same problem with a cutting torch Modified Sweep.

Jim Droscha

I have used a cut off wheel also but mine don’t cover enough acres to see if they really wear faster or break so I cannot speak for the longevity of that method. I do know that they stay cooler than a torch cut though. 

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The cracking between bolts was a earth metal problem in the early 2000's. It was such a problem I worked out a warranty replacement for our customers with our CIH rep. I handed out 1000's of sweeps. If a guy for example bought 50 of them for his field cult. and one cracked. He got all new ones. It was a PITA situation for everyone. The 1/2 sweeps were higher priced so we would chop saw them as needed

 

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I got the angle grinder, but not a actual big chop saw, so it would be hand-held work.   I wonder if a plasma cutter would work, much less heat?

The thing is, they don't really break down by the cut.   They break up thru the bolts and to each side, esp. near the bottom of the shank.   Maybe 1-2 have cracked down to the "cut".   Mostly you have the unbroken "shovel" with the entire shank broken off in 2-4 pieces.   I will say that only the cut off ones break, but those also have the nitrogen tubes (and rust more).   

Sounds like I need to go back to "cheap" shovels.

Could anybody comment on the comparison between the "cut" shovels and simply using a smaller (7"?) sweep set a little further away on the front shanks?  (This is 36" rows , so I have 5 shanks per row, which gives me some flex in covering the entire row.)

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Jeff I am just asking, do you use the thin wheel made for cutting or just the regular grinding wheel. I use the cut off wheel on lots and lots of stuff. Have a real cut off saw, a torch , and a plasma cutter. The cut off wheel is used much more often than the rest combined.

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Just for the record.... torching the wing off will have no bearing on the bolt hole failures. Brittleness is not a factor either unless you heated the whole thing red hot and quenched it. Annealing and case hardening are the things most likely to occur with the use of a torch, depending upon the skill level of the user. Annealing won’t occur at all unless you have a #3 tip, ten times the heat that is needed for that little nip. Case hardening is actually beneficial, except for the fact that it occurs at the point of the least amount of wear on the sweep. Case hardening comes from a rich side of a neutral flame condition, and the acetylene carbon is absorbed by the molten steel at the point of the cut. 
    The bolt hole failures are a problem at the factory, not the modification by the end user.

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Yeah, I got the same CIH sweeps on both a Glencoe FC & a DMI FC, and on all the rest of the Row Crop shanks....and the ONLY ones that break are the ones with the N tubes under them.   

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