Jump to content

Another trailer tire failure


New Englander
 Share

Recommended Posts

I got home from a trip and my wife said "I thought I heard a shot in the yard, so I looked and no one was there". "Go look at the wood chipper".

I've had other trailer tires fail but not sitting still in the yard. That chipper is very heavy but it never leaves the place; get towed at 5 MPH at most. Tire was Goodyear, not Chinese. Looked good but old.

I had another tire blow in the yard. It was a 10.00 20 on my bucket truck. It was in the fall - hunting season, and I heard the weirdest sounding shot and wondered what kind of gun was that. Sometime later I discovered the blown tire and I was quite glad I was nowhere near it when it went.

wood chipper tire fail 1.JPG

Wood chipper tire fail 2.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

on my 18 ft flatbed, i have bought everything brand wise and i cant get more than 2 or 3 yrs out of any trailer tire - they either blow, or separate the rubber from belts and bubble up and shake your teeth loose 

Ive spent 80 bucks to 200 for a trailer tire and no notable diff in life - the light weight trailer i have tires seem to rot off but i dont use them on the hwy 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has anyone used recycled aircraft tires on their trailers. I have them on the front wheels of our 464 mower and they have proven to be fool proof after they have tubes installed.  No weather cracking or tread separation. Could be a DOT issue but on a farm trailer anything goes. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, oleman said:

Has anyone used recycled aircraft tires on their trailers. I have them on the front wheels of our 464 mower and they have proven to be fool proof after they have tubes installed.  No weather cracking or tread separation. Could be a DOT issue but on a farm trailer anything goes. 

Aircraft tires are built to a TSO - Technical Standard Order and are generally rated for way more weight than a similar vehicle tire. The little 5.00 5 nose tire on my Cessna is rated for 1285 lbs. I know that because I just changed it yesterday?.

Of course that doesn't mean they'd be ok on the highway for a long stretch.

Out of curiosity I just looked up the L1011 tire rating only because I changed a lot of them - 62,500 lbs each, and there's 8 mains per plane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A friend of mine was pulling a honey wagon home from an auction for his brother, on the interstate, running 70+mph and got pulled over by Missouri State trooper. He was concerned about the tires on the wagon, they walked back and looked at the sidewall, speed rating was 220mph. Trooper told him to have a nice day and safe trip home and left.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had aircraft tires fail on farm wagons that were carrying a heavy load for a long distance. My tire dealer said that they will get hot and fail if loaded heavy and pulled for long distances at a higher sopped. They work great for some farm applications though. They apparently can take very high speeds and heat for a short amount of time or lower loads and lower speeds for a long time. I don’t use them on wagons any more because of the failures we had. Just my experience. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I looked up the date code - 39th week of 1996! I guess no matter how good they look they're just too old. I replaced that load range D with an E. Since the chipper never leaves the place I probably won't bother to replace the other, just will walk way around it?.

I like Cliff's idea of using a load range F or so. My equipment trailer has 4 Ds on it because that's what it came with. If I'd thought about it I would have replaced them with E or F. That trailer has never given me a problem but I don't haul much anymore and am more likely to use it for long lumber or a car hauler.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Cliff Neubauer said:

We are changing over to 14 ply trailer tires, don't cost a lot more than a 10 ply but they are a much better tire.

They put 4 new 14 ply on our gooseneck at work. The thing is never loaded near capacity, but sees alot of miles. The last of the 4 made it a year. Every one bulged or blew the face off. Back to 10 ply now. I'm very disappointed with the 14 ply trailer tires.

On my own trailers, I buy the cheapest 10 or 12 ply tires I can. Been 7 years on the oldest set, still look like new, and the trailers are always maxed out. As much as I don't want to buy Chinese stuff, the best tires I've been buying are just that. 

We've had lots of old truck tired on implements blow the face off just sitting in the yard. The sun is hard on them. Worst one though is when a 20.8r34 firestone blew in the yard. Parked it in the yard one night, come the next morning and back tire down. Thats a more time consuming fix lol

  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, searcyfarms said:

on my 18 ft flatbed, i have bought everything brand wise and i cant get more than 2 or 3 yrs out of any trailer tire - they either blow, or separate the rubber from belts and bubble up and shake your teeth loose 

Ive spent 80 bucks to 200 for a trailer tire and no notable diff in life - the light weight trailer i have tires seem to rot off but i dont use them on the hwy 

 

On our 28x7.7 cattle trailer too.  GY are good and we are trying a Hankook on tire guys advice.  17.5 rims.  Heavy 120psi duty ones  and they all in 14 months (12000 miles id guess) will have poor wear or break belt.

Tire guy says in his 50 years never have tires been so poor quality as today.  Esp E range and T range.  My trucks 20" GY are letting belts go with 80% tread.  So trying Hankook there too.  Firestones/Bridgestone were great 7 years ago and now he wont rec them for a towing application. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, searcyfarms said:

on my 18 ft flatbed, i have bought everything brand wise and i cant get more than 2 or 3 yrs out of any trailer tire - they either blow, or separate the rubber from belts and bubble up and shake your teeth loose 

Ive spent 80 bucks to 200 for a trailer tire and no notable diff in life - the light weight trailer i have tires seem to rot off but i dont use them on the hwy 

 

Where I used to work we put on a lot of Westlake trailer tires on everything from a utility trailer to 14 ply equipment Trailer. We had good luck with them, no premature separation or bulges. I have never been a fan of Carlisle or goodyear they go bad at the drop of a hat. Kenda trailer tires were a little better, and honestly we would put highway tread Cooper built or sumitomo built 235/85/16 ten ply truck tires on many trailers. They weren't much more expensive but outlasted the Carlisle and goodyear tires by years. Westlakes were factory tires on a dump trailer we have and they have lasted 5 or 6 years on it. They are worn out but didn't fail. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, New Englander said:

I got home from a trip and my wife said "I thought I heard a shot in the yard, so I looked and no one was there". "Go look at the wood chipper".

I've had other trailer tires fail but not sitting still in the yard. That chipper is very heavy but it never leaves the place; get towed at 5 MPH at most. Tire was Goodyear, not Chinese. Looked good but old.

I had another tire blow in the yard. It was a 10.00 20 on my bucket truck. It was in the fall - hunting season, and I heard the weirdest sounding shot and wondered what kind of gun was that. Sometime later I discovered the blown tire and I was quite glad I was nowhere near it when it went.

wood chipper tire fail 1.JPG

Wood chipper tire fail 2.JPG

that looks like one of those GY Marathons, gave up on the a long time ago - blew out a couple/yr on my horse trailer and tore up wiring/fenders/lights with tread peeling on them too 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i have tried the loadmax and they flew the tread - got two of the H901 hercules and was liking the way they were going until i ran over something and punctured a sidewall so only had one of those left and then it got a bubble and started vibrating to beat the band so i swapped it for two cheapo trailmax or trailking chicong knockoffs since i cant seem to find anything that lasts ovr a couple yrs why pay premium for the hercules @ $175/tire the chicongs were 125ish IIRC

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our little 7K car hauler has 4 normal  car tires on it. 235/75R15  HANKOOKS seem to be best in weathering. It never goes over 55 MPH, our self imposed trailer speed limit.  When loaded with the tractor it is normally short trips. We have not had any tire issues, BUT if I was tearing down the highway at 70 MPH loaded to max it would be a different situation. We will switch to LT E rated tires if making a long haul on the car hauler. 

Due to age, the tires on our transit bus based RV need to be replaced. Currently we would be using HANKOOK AH37 tires in 11R22.5 16 ply, 6 new tires at one time. Currently the RV has 275/70R22.5 16 ply tires the 11R22.5 tires are taller  and will allow a little  higher road speed and they cost less.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...