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Mulberry's............


dads706
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For those not familiar with them, in my part of Iowa they are considered a weed. I swear if you planted one in your yard, it would die. They need a woven wire fence or an old piece of farm machinery to really survive. They must use iron and rust as fertilizer. I hate them..!!! I've been fighting them in fences and terraces for as long as I can remember. The birds eat the berries and crap them all over. And with a rain shower, they will probably sprout in 6 inches of concrete. I pity anyone who parks a vehicle under a Mulberry tree because the purple stain is next to impossible to remove.

But..... grandma and the grandkids picked a couple gallons this afternoon.   Fresh Mulberries and vanilla ice cream... a real treat on a summer afternoon.

(For those wondering. Yep, the d*mn tree is growing in a fence row. It has a woven wire fence in the middle of it.)

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I remember them from my time in Eastern Nebr. Don't think we have them out here, too dry maybe???

You are right about recoloring a car, nasty. 

Also remember purple fingers from picking them for grandma's sunday after dinner ice cream?

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Grew up in NE Nebraska and as a kid loved when mulberries got ripe. Were times Mom would holler, time for supper. I would be slow too the table, been eaten mulberries off and on all afternoon. In our north shelter belt we had a mulberry tree that produced white mulberries. Tasted like mother natures version of cubed sugar. The tree was also huge. Must have been 80 to 90 feet tall, and even as an adult if you tried to tree hug it, would be like hugging a wall. 

 

Good memories 

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We have several, mulberries out the wazoo! Some really sweet ones this year, I pick several every time I walk past. Yes; they are a weed!  They grow anywhere as I guess the birds drop seeds. I cut down new saplings all the time. Sometimes I put poultry netting around the one particularly large tree and put a bunch of chickens in. They clean them right up and then spread mulberry chicken purple poop all over!

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The name reminds me when I first started the department in ‘72, we were expected to wear our uniforms to work, so with a need for cold weather wear the jacket of choice was a navy pea jacket and for dress wear or inclement weather we were supplied with a navy blue overcoat called a mulberry, haven’t thought of that in 40 years, that habit stayed with me, I wore my uniform to work til I retired, just made more sense.

mulberry jam? Gotta try it.

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Several years ago we toured Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's home.  They talked about "Mullberry Row", a line of mullberry trees like it was such a big deal.  I though the same thing as you, they are nothing but a d**n weed.  I've never eaten them but my Dad says his Mom made mullberry jam when he was a kid.

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They are ripe right now. Ate some the other day spraying weeds along fence row. Yes they are a pain but the berries are tasty too. Dad always ate em off the tree and I usually eat a few every year off the tree too. Mild berry flavor.

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Yep, the coons are eating them here right now! Been seeing coon crap full of seeds. The darn things ate the cherries a day before the birds would have eaten them. Broke a good sized limb out of the tree during their supper.

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2 minutes ago, Alan Dinan said:

Yep, the coons are eating them here right now! Been seeing coon crap full of seeds. The darn things ate the cherries a day before the birds would have eaten them. Broke a good sized limb out of the tree during their supper.

i was going to say, go out there at night and it will look like a christmas tree with all the eyes when you put a light on it, next best coon bait besides your sweet corn patch when its ripe

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Lots of 'em here as well - squirrels are tearing them up... Had a red fox under one tree about 30 yds from the house the other night.

My Mom always made jam out of 'em. My wife and I leave them alone 'cause our blueberry bushes are in full swing.

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Lots of mulberry trees here too.  Like everyone said I think the are a volunteer weed.  They seem to establish rather quickly on their own.

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Evidently they don’t grow here, i have never seen one, I just looked them up, they look like raspberries/blackberries on the same bush, but get 30-90’ tall? Wild! 

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The nearest Mulberry trees to my house are over 1/2 mile away.  Mowed my yard last week and must have mowed off at least 40 sprouts planted by birds.  And now the coons are helping them!!  Mulberries, Red Cedars, and Multiflora Rose are the worst pasture weeds we have.

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We had a small orchard when I was growing up that had a big mulberry tree, we never picked them, just laid an old sheet under It and shook the branches. They were pretty good with ice cream but I swear now it seems they will grow through a crack in the concrete.

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There are things growing around here that i was told was mulberry. I know when you see one growing, it could be 1.5 feet tall and you cant even pull the thing out of the ground by hand. If you chop em off they always come back, they are tough things but i don't recall ever seeing berries on them. I know of one i saw last year that is growing in a rotted patch of living branch of another tree. Its weird to see a tree with another tree growing in it.

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They forgot to mention woven wire fences, old machinery, and the fact that you can't kill the damn things. And the fact that if you plant just 1, YOU and ALL your neighbors will have a 100 in a couple years. (I think the latter is where woven wire and old machinery come into the picture.) All growing anywhere but where you want them. Wherever a bird can crap is where you will have one. 

The comments remind me of some SYFI movies..... oh look, its so sweet and cute and cuddly.

Just wait, the monster is only starting to awaken...... (insert a Boris Karloff laugh here)

https://www.fast-growing-trees.com/products/Black-Beauty-Mulberry-Tree?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIs-y7pI6v8QIVhSs4Ch2mtgnhEAMYASAAEgKtDfD_BwE

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Put 1/2 and 1/2 Diesel fuel and Tordon on the stump right after you cut the tree will take care of it so it doesn't grow back. 

We've cut many out of our fencerows during our fencerow wars and it works. 

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11 hours ago, MoeSzyslak said:

There are things growing around here that i was told was mulberry. I know when you see one growing, it could be 1.5 feet tall and you cant even pull the thing out of the ground by hand. If you chop em off they always come back, they are tough things but i don't recall ever seeing berries on them. I know of one i saw last year that is growing in a rotted patch of living branch of another tree. Its weird to see a tree with another tree growing in it.

We always squirt Tordon on them after cutting them, that keeps them from coming back.  The Tordon RTU comes in a quart bottle with a squirt cap, works really slick.

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14 hours ago, IH Forever said:

We always squirt Tordon on them after cutting them, that keeps them from coming back.  The Tordon RTU comes in a quart bottle with a squirt cap, works really slick.

I learned later than I should have to dope anything I cut (other than Red Cedar) with Tordon RTU right after I cut it.  Do not turn around…do not take your eye off the stump…dope it NOW!!  It is amazing stuff.  Cut an Osage Orange (Hedge) tree that was 3 feet across and treated it.  The only sprouts were from roots at the surface near the stump.  RTU also works well on Mulberry and Elm trees.  The Red Cedars are easy to kill.  Just be sure to cut them below the lowest branch and they will not grow back.  No need for RTU.

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But .... Tordon is also some nasty stuff in that it does not discriminate. In other words.... if you have a bad tree and a good tree growing close enough together that their roots can grow together, you may end up killing the good tree as well as keeping the bad one from coming back. Not sure, but it may even say something similar on the label. Couple people from ISU (Iowa State) killed some of the school's trees that way. The herbicide passes from the 'bad' roots to the 'good' roots through contact underground.

Grazon (the restricted one) contains Tordon also. Be careful where you spread the manure from the hay. It can pass from the hay, through the animal and end up in the manure. Heard a story about a guy who killed his potato crop because he spread a bunch of manure and hay from around his hay rings on his garden. Seems everything would sprout and after about the third leaf stage the plants would just curl up and die. (heard this from my ISU agronomist)

Oh believe me, I don't really like the stuff but I keep a bottle handy when cutting Mulberries and Chinese Elm. I'm just careful where I use it.

An FYI for anyone interested (again from ISU) straight Roundup (the stuff you get from you chemical supplier, not the stuff from you local garden center) will work as will as Tordon if used at the right time. Cut the tree in July/August when the plant is sending nutrients to the roots. Then use straight Roundup just like you would Tordon. But it only works when the plant is sending nutrients to the roots, not the other way around. And Roundup breaks down almost immediately in the soil. (I know you guys already knew that), just wanted to mention it for those not familiar with some of the farm herbicides.

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6 hours ago, E160BHM said:

RTU also works well on Mulberry and Elm trees.  Th

You have live Elms? Around here what Elm trees that do manage to grow get about 20 rings around and catch Dutch Elm Disease and die.

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