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The clamp on dual topic reminds me of a story lately in my neck of the woods. Local tire shop lost an employee within the last couple of months. This man did farm calls for his living for years. Very sharp guy they say. I never met him. He was at another guy I do knows place mounting a tire. Not positive if he was putting duals on or off, but he somehow got on the wrong end of the tire and lost his footing. The owner came home and found him under the tire dead. I had heard his service truck with a crane was on site but he wasnt using it. I'm going off second hand information here, but bottom line a good man lost his life over a darn tire too young. So please guys when swapping duals out wait for a hand, use a crane or skidsteer, check your surroundings before you yank it off the hub. Please be careful. 

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x10.... especially with the tire sizes today, it's almost impossible to do it alone without some sort of helping hand. Be it human or mechanical.

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My 2-135 has 20.8 axle duals. No way would I manhandle them. I use the skidloader with forks.

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I was replacing the front spindle assembly for someone on a large frame Spra Coupe. I think it had 38” front wheels. I took the wheel off and completed the repair and was going to put the wheel back on. I knew that front wheel was very heavy and I was by myself. The ground was uneven and I lost control of that wheel for a split second. I knew if I dropped it I had no way to pick it back up, so I tried to keep it from going down. That was a big mistake. It landed on me and I thought I had broken my leg and/or my ankle. I got out from under it somehow. Turns out nothing was broken, but my ankle has never been right since. I am no novice when it comes to this kind of work, it can all go south faster than you can get out of the way. The lesson I learned is get some help and if a tire starts to fall get the he!! out of the way and figure it out later. I was lucky, it could have been much worse. My wife gave me an earful when I finally limped into the house that night. 

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I can handle 18.4 x 38's myself but radials are a bit heavier. Anything bigger than that I bought a dual wheel changer. Or get help.

Sad to lose a life to that. 

 

http://www.biermansales.com/Product/WheelChangers

EZ Dual Changer

 
  • Change your duals by yourself in just 5 minutes
  • The EZ Dual Changer can be hung from a chain hoist, front end loader, forklift, or service truck boom
  • The tire is held securly in place and turns easily on wheels and rollers to assist in lining up the lug nuts
  • The EZ Dual Changer can handle tires as wide as 32" and lift up to 3000 pounds


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http://www.biermansales.com/images/model36front.jpgmodel36front.jpg.9f4aec2fa39662440c976828a932999d.jpg

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The sad part is losing anyone to industrial accidents, this is from nothing but personal experience, we become so adept at doing functions we take shortcuts, 99.9% of the time we walk away unscathed, nuff sed.

When my son started pipe fitting with me I showed him the full tilt boogie on every function, and it was a time consuming process, I never realized how many corners I cut in the name of speed, 30 ft in the air working and cutting a 21ft section of pipe, a walk in the park, but showing junior the proper way plus tightening and I wondered why I never got hurt. 

Working at fires the same thing, it wasn’t we ever got lazy we were taking shortcuts, but the workers board made that harder and harder until my leaving in ‘08, and now don’t even think about wildcatting because you will get slammed.

a sad way to get an important subject out in the open.

 

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The youngest was a man handling a set here last weekend and I wouldn't leave his side. If it starts to get away I will help or I am taking the hit not you. Not the smartest or safest but in my mind better me than him. Any other time we would have used the loader. I know better because I had a torn up knee just about put me under a combine wheel and tire out in the field.

I am going to show him this thread when he gets back this weekend.

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I used to change wheels on my Rogator all the time by myself. The 20.8X34 were nothing. The 14.9X52 are nearly impossible alone and not much better with someone else. 

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I put my 18.4-38 duals on myself alot. I'm a big guy, and can pick them up easily from the ground and stand them straight up. But those are as much as I'll do and even them ill bet could break a leg or crush you if you were under them. I let em go if they get away. 

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I was told a long time ago it’s easier for two people to pick it up off the ground than for one person to pick it up off another. If it gets away from you let it go and get clear. Most important thing is if there are two people make sure they are on the same page about letting go. 

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15 hours ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

I can handle 18.4 x 38's myself but radials are a bit heavier. Anything bigger than that I bought a dual wheel changer. Or get help.

Sad to lose a life to that. 

 

http://www.biermansales.com/Product/WheelChangers

EZ Dual Changer

 
  • Change your duals by yourself in just 5 minutes
  • The EZ Dual Changer can be hung from a chain hoist, front end loader, forklift, or service truck boom
  • The tire is held securly in place and turns easily on wheels and rollers to assist in lining up the lug nuts
  • The EZ Dual Changer can handle tires as wide as 32" and lift up to 3000 pounds


View More

http://www.biermansales.com/images/model36front.jpgmodel36front.jpg.9f4aec2fa39662440c976828a932999d.jpg

We have one of those. Works pretty slick.

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20 hours ago, Missouri Mule said:

The clamp on dual topic reminds me of a story lately in my neck of the woods. Local tire shop lost an employee within the last couple of months. This man did farm calls for his living for years. Very sharp guy they say. I never met him. He was at another guy I do knows place mounting a tire. Not positive if he was putting duals on or off, but he somehow got on the wrong end of the tire and lost his footing. The owner came home and found him under the tire dead. I had heard his service truck with a crane was on site but he wasnt using it. I'm going off second hand information here, but bottom line a good man lost his life over a darn tire too young. So please guys when swapping duals out wait for a hand, use a crane or skidsteer, check your surroundings before you yank it off the hub. Please be careful. 

No one will ever know what happened there for sure, story i got was that he had taken off the 46" dual with 1000# weight attached to fix an inside tire that was flat, Somehow that dual ended up on top of him. He had worked on a lot of tires for us ,with two different companies,it was a tragic accident that probably could have been prevented.

He was a hard worker and well respected they had a line of tractors,trucks,sprayers and what ever else along the road on the way too the cemetery,and this was in the heart of planting season.

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Very sad to hear that.  My condolences to those near the victim.

Be careful around big wheels!  A local guy I know of was laid up this spring just before planting when a rear tractor dual tipped unexpectedly and hit him.  His leg was broken in several places.   It has been quite a few years, more like 20 years, since I have manhandled duals.  Built a dual mover for a skid steer a long time ago and that is how they all get moved now.

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Few people realize the sacrifices from many people in many industries that it takes to keep this country moving. Many truckers, construction workers, mechanics, miners, farmers and many other industries too numerous to mention have given it all just trying to keep the bills paid. Even if many industrial workers live long enough to be considered old, by that time they will have nothing left to give. It is a tragedy that everyone in the country knows the name of the latest person who refused to obey the law and died while resisting arrest, but they will never hear this man’s name. I hope those who knew him remember his family in this time of need. Like many others I’ve had a few close calls and am only here by the grace of God. I’m going to say a prayer for this man’s family and I hope others will as well. 

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Some guys here had a Super M with the rear tires filled with fluid. They wanted to replace the axle seal and didn't have anything to lift it with so just thought they'd slide the wheel off and roll it away. It went down on one of them and broke his ankle. Painful for him I'm sure, he still walks with a limp. 

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1 hour ago, from H to 80 said:

No one will ever know what happened there for sure, story i got was that he had taken off the 46" dual with 1000# weight attached to fix an inside tire that was flat, Somehow that dual ended up on top of him. He had worked on a lot of tires for us ,with two different companies,it was a tragic accident that probably could have been prevented.

He was a hard worker and well respected they had a line of tractors,trucks,sprayers and what ever else along the road on the way too the cemetery,and this was in the heart of planting season.

That's basically the story I got as well. I heard the man was a hard worker and always trying to get the person going as quickly as he could. Like I said I never met him but I do know exactly where he was when it happened. Sad sad story. 

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So sad for him and his family -  if they start moving i let them fall/go i hv a skid steer or neighbor with a loader - i chg rear tire flats mounted and repair tubes on tractors - 18.4 38 are plenty heavy duals w/out weights 

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