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Can someone tell me what exactly this is?


ArkLa 1086
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https://www.equipmentfacts.com/listings/farm-equipment/auctions/online/205507047/international-binder?_gac=1.191620952.1620459343.CjwKCAjw7diEBhB-EiwAskVi1703DM4XDXQfkpXyM1hzMj0445NvAKJQHWDKGlZlEFhJuh0x0i26yRoCmHEQAvD_BwE       and tell me how it works.  Just saw it looking around. Obviously a harvester with a reel and cutter bar but never saw anything like it before.

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That’s a grain binder like previously stated.  They don’t have those down there??  I thought they were universal.  Basically is makes bundles with twine to be feed into a threshing machine.  

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Ok, the ones I have seen before the stalks were tied upright/vertical then laid to the side on the ground. But no they don't have them down here and if they ever did they went to scrap long before I was brought into this world.  I still can't make heads or tails of the back of the thing.

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Looks like a pretty old one! Looks like you pulling one direction to the field and then a different direction to use it. I think that was common for some of the early ones? Not a corn binder, it would have something more resembling corn picker snouts for a header if it was I believe.

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One at the in-laws in the fence row like that. They used to go around the neighborhood and harvest everyone's grain and they made a harvest team to share the labor for everyone

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2 hours ago, ArkLa 1086 said:

Ok, the ones I have seen before the stalks were tied upright/vertical then laid to the side on the ground. But no they don't have them down here and if they ever did they went to scrap long before I was brought into this world.  I still can't make heads or tails of the back of the thing.


 

 

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Back in that day our cash crop down here was cotton. Corn and wheat were grown mostly for local use and on a smaller scale. Cotton was king. Lots of old cotton stuff can be found. Gins were everywhere, even up here in the mountains.

There are a few things like that around in museums. If left outside they rot and rust away quickly. Wooden barns don't last like they do up north either.

Thx-Ace 

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10 minutes ago, acem said:

Back in that day our cash crop down here was cotton. Corn and wheat were grown mostly for local use and on a smaller scale. Cotton was king. Lots of old cotton stuff can be found. Gins were everywhere, even up here in the mountains.

There are a few things like that around in museums. If left outside they rot and rust away quickly. Wooden barns don't last like they do up north either.

Thx-Ace 

How did they harvest rice back then?

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Actually I'm told rice was slow to adopt agriculture automation. The mud just caused all kinds of problems. I'm told they didn't start using combines until the 50s.

I can't imagine dragging that stuff through the mud.

Of course that was before my time.

Thx-Ace 

 

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It's definitely a grain binder. It appears to be a horse drawn binder. The one in the video is a tractor powered binder. They came along later. The horse binder was powered by the large ground drive wheel shown in some of the pics. The tractor binder has a PTO shaft. Both were transported endways on the small wheels. Once in the field the large wheel was cranked or jacked down to take the weight off of the smaller transport wheels. They were then removed and the tongue was moved from the end to the side. You may notice that the tractor binder has some levers accessible from tractor seat. 

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That thing is clean and complete!  Esp since its from my IH book from the 1890s...?  Hard to tell from just book pictured but sure seems older style.  What a example 

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21 minutes ago, TroyDairy said:

That thing is clean and complete!  Esp since its from my IH book from the 1890s...?  Hard to tell from just book pictured but sure seems older style.  What a example 

Not to be that stickler guy but if its an IH, it isn't from the 1890s.  We had several IH binders from old homesteads around here plus we have a No 4E which was the last binder IH built and this one was bought new by us after WW II.  Has factory rubber tires.  Between all that, the binder in the FB ad looks like any other binder around here from the 1910/20s.  

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23 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

Not to be that stickler guy but if its an IH, it isn't from the 1890s.  We had several IH binders from old homesteads around here plus we have a No 4E which was the last binder IH built and this one was bought new by us after WW II.  Has factory rubber tires.  Between all that, the binder in the FB ad looks like any other binder around here from the 1910/20s.  

Stickler...

 

I just thought it looked like a old McCormick [IH] from the 80s book I have archiving IH and its history.  '150 years IH' iirc is the title.

THat being said They all looks so similar to the unassuming eye from the era.

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