Jump to content

Please tell me about this H


vtfireman85
 Share

Recommended Posts

pretty sure that tool box is off a McCormick Dearing horse drawn mower I have had some of them over the years Used to fine the in the hedgerows and save the tool box and oil can if they were still god

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, m.c.farmerboy said:

pretty sure that tool box is off a McCormick Dearing horse drawn mower I have had some of them over the years Used to fine the in the hedgerows and save the tool box and oil can if they were still god

after looking a little closer I was wrong on the tool box  it is a fordson

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like a 40. 41 or 42 model to me. Can't see the PTO good enough to see what models it was used on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A pretty stout fellow had to own it if he used it in the winter up in the North East would not be a easy item to crank every morning first thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Growing up we had a '41 H that had those cutoff rear rims. Uncle bought the tractor new on steel. Was able to get a ration card to buy rubber tires for it. He had to take the tires he could get, q5:5×38s. Tractor had a live hyd pump & Behlen power steering plus a Scwhartz cable lift loader and was used to feed cattle from 1941 tillm~ 1963 when we got out of cattle. It made a 2 mile round trip twice a day feeding cattle.

 

A couple years ago there was a jig for sale on Facebook that was used to weld the rims to the spokes. Jig was about 5 miles from me in Danville Il which was the home of an IH company store. Unfortunately I missed out on buying the jig, had already sold when I called.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, hagan said:

A pretty stout fellow had to own it if he used it in the winter up in the North East would not be a easy item to crank every morning first thing.

  Old timers always said the trick was to drain the oil out every night and bring it in near a wood stove.  Pour back in the morning like it was summer outside.  Some even brought the coolant in regardless if it had anti-freeze in or not.  One had to be paying attention that everything was tight each and every morning or have disaster befall them.  I guess as long as it started ASAP.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not real early second style of seat and transmission cover but old enough for the tall filter and cut offs  more than likely a  war time rationed tractor. Nice piece of equipment to play with.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

56 minutes ago, 766 Man said:

  Old timers always said the trick was to drain the oil out every night and bring it in near a wood stove.  Pour back in the morning like it was summer outside.  Some even brought the coolant in regardless if it had anti-freeze in or not.  One had to be paying attention that everything was tight each and every morning or have disaster befall them.  I guess as long as it started ASAP.  

I remember one time in the early 60's dad had a farmall M on the farmhand 10 and it was cold. M didn't want to start very good and he told John (the hired man) that they needed to get some 10 weight oil and put in it. Later that evening dad and i used it and it started to knock. Got to checking and John had drained the oil and not said anything and went home. A New set of bearings is all it took and then all was fine

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The rear cut offs I have are 36" rims.

This tractor has the later style front frames with the cast iron motor mount blocks rather than the original style rubber mounts. Pressure style front hood and radiator. Early style belt pulley, four bolt thin flange and short control rod. Short swinging drawbar and short shield for use with the first two types of PTOs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, m.c.farmerboy said:

the rear wheels are what we call war time wheels, most H'S around here sold during WW 2 had those wheels on the rear  and after the war there where converted to rubber

One of the shops here that made potato equipment did a lot of them Farmall H  was the most popular tractor in this area during the war 

our local state prison grew potato's for all the prisons in Maine and they had two H'S with them wheels

My grandpa told a cool story about a potato farmer A-C customer in Maine. Brand new machine all covered with soot. The owner lit a fire under it daily in winter to warm the oil. Refused to entertain abandoning the practice.

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, KWRB said:

My grandpa told a cool story about a potato farmer A-C customer in Maine. Brand new machine all covered with soot. The owner lit a fire under it daily in winter to warm the oil. Refused to entertain abandoning the practice.

this was common practice and union position on construction jobs.

KOO now uses the fancy propane or torpedoes 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, KWRB said:

My grandpa told a cool story about a potato farmer A-C customer in Maine. Brand new machine all covered with soot. The owner lit a fire under it daily in winter to warm the oil. Refused to entertain abandoning the practice.

I have a cheap square charcoal grill without legs i use when we HAVE to start the dozer, no power there and usually have to go in in foot. My grandfather worked for Bellows Falls Ice Co (logging) they had TD9 crawlers, apparently fire was common starting practice. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, vtfireman85 said:

I have a cheap square charcoal grill without legs i use when we HAVE to start the dozer, no power there and usually have to go in in foot. My grandfather worked for Bellows Falls Ice Co (logging) they had TD9 crawlers, apparently fire was common starting practice. 

Please do not burn down your dozer shed!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks a lot like the H the neighbor here sold me.  He had it for 50 years.  Same cut offs on rear and the front rims are welded on too.  I guess I need to dig it out and ask some questions on here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, 1586 Jeff said:

Please do not burn down your dozer shed!!!

You HAVE seen the dozer shed? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/12/2021 at 9:42 PM, vtfireman85 said:

They jumped out at me too, i hope someone can tell us more. Maybe steel originally as well? 

Originally steel, Called cut downs. Rims were sourced and just welded to the spokes after cutting steel wheel rim off. Usually 36" rims. At least ours was.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, 1586 Jeff said:

Please do not burn down your dozer shed!!!

 

2 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

You HAVE seen the dozer shed? 

 

27D32B8B-9FB3-4424-BADD-6796C9BDD143.jpeg

A49F6EDF-5226-40A1-BC06-A95D432E31D6.jpeg

2D966A9A-BD09-43CB-9AD0-A7C0875246E7.jpeg

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...