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966 wheel lock


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Of the three big tractors, all of them have a different type of wheel lock from side to side. Was this a normal production thing, or over the years have they been monkeyed with?

On the 966, it also has two different type's of wheel locks.

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This is the one on the left side. Appears to be pretty straight forward.

 

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This is the one on the right side. If you noticed, the one on the right is much further out on the axle than the left. This is not intentional, it has been slowly walking it's way out.

There has been many discussions on here about needing the special tool to remove the wheel lock. The left wheel does not look like it would need anything special. The main one of concern is obviously the second picture of the right wheel. Is this the style that would require the special tool?

Is there a common reason or problem with this style of clamp that lets it move out? This has occurred over a number of years, but also, it probably doesn't see 100 hours a year.

Thank you for your time and help.

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Someone broke a center casting (probably from wheel running loose) and replaced it with one from a yard, clamp was likely standard and wedge lock is likely the replacement,  but who knows for sure.  

 

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Exactly. They  used what they could find.  Nothing wrong with it.  

jass1660,  There’s probably very little chance that the axle was painted before the wheel was installed. Look at the paint all over the head of the wedge lock bolt. It’s probably just moving because it was never tightened properly.

Duntongw,  you just need a socket (7/8” 12pt) and a Big breaker bar. Jack tractor up, And tighten that 12 point bolt in the center before the wheel walks itself off the end of the axle and you have an accident. Do that ASAP. -Unless you want to learn how to use that tool (the steel horse shoe piece with the two bolts) and loosen the wheel so that you can slide it back into the correct location.

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Stronger 800, yes, we need to loosen the lock and move the wheel in where it should be. Have not done, because I thought we needed something else to do it.

If you would, What is the proper procedure for loosening the lock with the horse shoe piece on it?

Thank you for your help.

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Most likely you were looking at one of the other wheels that does not have that tool bolted to it. So that it physically just looks different at a glance. The one in your first picture is just called a bolt or clamp on wheel. The second one, that’s loose, is the more common (andbetter) wedgelock Wheel 

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 The horseshoe piece is already bolted into the working position. All you need to do is start loosening the 12 point bolt in the center of the wedge itself. Flip the wheel over like I mentioned, and when you start to loosen that 12 point bolt in the middle of the wedge out until they bump into the tool. Actually one side bumps into the tool, the tool stops it and that’s what makes the other side start to move and then  loosen up.  This is where you’ll get various opinions: It has been said that the correct method is to hammer straight down on the axle with a sledgehammer if the wedge does not pop free for you. I believe that is right out of the manual, I have just never needed to do it.  Before you slide the wheel in, you will want to reach in behind that tire and clean all of the rust and paint off of the axle, in as far as where you want the wheel to go anyway

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450 ft/lbs on that bolt, I think.  Somebody on here will probably post a link to the technically correct procedure shortly. I can just tell you that I’ve done it a bunch of times and never had any trouble. I also use to tighten the bolts to six or 700 pounds as that’s what I had been taught was correct as a kid. Turns out the guys on here showed me that the actual spec is a lot less.

Just know that that bolt might feel like it has 600 pounds of pressure on it right now, Even if it has been loose and wiggling. Soak it with your favorite penetrating oil ahead of time if you can

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8 hours ago, Duntongw said:

That's what I say, the 1066, 100 Hydro, and 966 all have a different lock. The nephew say's there is a third style on one, but I did not look for it.

Someone has been awfully hard on all the tractors you ended up with.

There are only two styles, clamp and wedge lock. Not sure where your nephew is getting a third. Wedge lock is stronger for sure. They came up with this because the clamp style wasn't holding up on the 1206 especially with clamp on duals.

If you have a clamp style on the 1066 you might want to consider swapping it with the wedge style on the 966 if they both have 38" centers. That's a winter project, though.

My dad had a clever way of "walking" a wedge lock wheel along the axle to move it. Your first instinct is to try and brute force it but this is much easier:

Roll the wheel so the key is up. Jack the tractor up and remove the wedge. Now lower the tractor slightly (helps to have a vice grip on the jack handle for better control) and tilt the wheel in or out depending on which way you want to go. Jack the tractor back up. That will lift the wheel into its new position. The more you lower the tractor and lean the tire, the farther it will move with each cycle. Repeat until you reach the desired width.

Oh, and don't go by axle stick-out especially when you have two different hubs. You might also have the rims on different bevels too, which would make one show 4" more axle than the other side.

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1 hour ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Someone has been awfully hard on all the tractors you ended up with.

Oh I wouldn’t say that. The 1066 was perfectly capable of having hub clamp problems without being abused. Too tall a wheel for what that clamp could hold. Been there, got the T shirt, wore it out, and was glad to be rid of it. 

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Best I can see in the pic, the wedge looks like it’s set fairly wide, not sucked in, like it would be if it was worn (one would think).   And the paint isn’t all marred up, so it doesn’t appear to have been floating around too much/really wearing the surfaces. I think it probably just needs a good tightening. 

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3 hours ago, Gearclash said:

Oh I wouldn’t say that. The 1066 was perfectly capable of having hub clamp problems without being abused. Too tall a wheel for what that clamp could hold. Been there, got the T shirt, wore it out, and was glad to be rid of it. 

We've had our fair share of hub problems with our 1066 too. Couldn't keep them from sliding on the axle until Dad put shims on the wedges.

IH should have used 3.5" axles on the 1066. Obviously they realized their mistake on the 1086.

I couldn't imagine clamp type hubs on a 1066. There was one for sale near me with 34" clamp type hubs.

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I had a wedge lock wheel walk out on a newly acquired 1486

This is what I came up with. 

Just remember to go slow, pay attention and if it binds, stop and get it off bind before preceding.

Mine slid in without an issue of any kind. 

Took longer to figure out where to hook chains (might have went across to other wheel???) and set up than to slide the wheel. 

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I find that the number 1 reason for walking/etc on a hub clamp is rust or paint on the clamps, wedges, hub casting, or axle.   I recommend sliding the wheel on out toward the end, completely removing the wedges or clamps, and cleaning everything up with a steel brush, sandpaper, whatever.     (its easier to get to the axle to clean it if the wheel is slid clear out.)   Get rid of any rust or paint.   Examine the parts for wear.  Make sure the hub is not worn too bad it does not "wedge" on the key side of the axle.   If its too worn to "wedge", but instead sits down hard on the axle flats, you will never get it to stay tight.  I've also seen axles worn at one spot.....

 Then use a light oil like chain lube to spray the entire area, slide the wheel in (careful - it may slide real easy!)  and reinstall the clamps or wedges.   The light oil helps them seat tight, just like using oil on head bolts when torquing.      

I personally have never had one work loose after doing the above.....I suppose some might argue with the oil as "easier to work loose again".   

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18 hours ago, stronger800 said:

Anytime. You’re welcome. I almost witnessed a local guy lose one of those off the back of his 1486  30 years ago, I came up behind him with my pick up truck just as he was climbing out of the cab, in the middle of the road, with the wheel.... underneath of the tractor

I lost both off an 5088 at different times before I knew better. One was right after I turn off highway and slowed down. I had bought the tractor and moved the wheels and tightened never checked again. Now if I move one I check them until bolt quits moving. 

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Usually its poor or worn out wedges or never retorqueing the hardware, I've never had one move on me,  The old clamp style I've had the bolts snap off occassionally 

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