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Tomorrow June 6th, hug a vet......


Dasnake
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If it wasn’t for the happenings in 1944 and their sacrifice we could be all waving at birds and eating sour kraut or worse.

They are passing pretty quick, I lost my last hold on the war two years ago at 101, and the funny part was neither he nor my old man bragged about anything, it was “something we had to do “ we could still learn a lot from their experiences.

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14 minutes ago, Dasnake said:

If it wasn’t for the happenings in 1944 and their sacrifice we could be all waving at birds and eating sour kraut or worse.

They are passing pretty quick, I lost my last hold on the war two years ago at 101, and the funny part was neither he nor my old man bragged about anything, it was “something we had to do “ we could still learn a lot from their experiences.

...don't hold your breath on this one Jake.....Our very own Chairman    Adern   suggests that "we"   are keeping arms length from the Chinese.....The peasants are not so sure...

...Australia seems to be aggravating the Chinks a mite......think NZ is not so outspoken...it's a worry

Mike

...totally agree with the rest of your sentiments....

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...and speaking of Veterans.....and @junkandcattle topic re     ''  Daddy's.''...............Another tear jerker

Russell Smith and Walt Wilkins..."Last Letter    Home "'

The late Russell Smith  was the Lead for " The Amazing Rhythm    Aces "".....an American Band of many years gone that made the British Bands of the same era  sound like an immature  bunch of shrieking  asylum   dwellers......

...and speaking of    "asylum  dwellers''    ..I can't even post the Utube link for this  song...sigh

Mike

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Dad and many of his friends served in WW2. They all served in the pacific. Uncle Neil was a b17 crewman in the army air corps of England. He was a great guy buy a little crazy. He was lucky to make it. I also met a German army vet. 

I don't know any WW2 vets that are still alive...

Thx-Ace 

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10 minutes ago, acem said:

Dad and many of his friends served in WW2. They all served in the pacific. Uncle Neil was a b17 crewman in the army air corps of England. He was a great guy buy a little crazy. He was lucky to make it. I also met a German army vet. 

I don't know any WW2 vets that are still alive...

Thx-Ace 

That is the way it is ace, the older we get the less of them, I remember meeting my great uncle in the early 60s, he was never right, fighting at Ypres he was gassed, lost use of most of his right side. 

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1 hour ago, mike newman said:

...and speaking of Veterans.....and @junkandcattle topic re     ''  Daddy's.''...............Another tear jerker

Russell Smith and Walt Wilkins..."Last Letter    Home "'

The late Russell Smith  was the Lead for " The Amazing Rhythm    Aces "".....an American Band of many years gone that made the British Bands of the same era  sound like an immature  bunch of shrieking  asylum   dwellers......

...and speaking of    "asylum  dwellers''    ..I can't even post the Utube link for this  song...sigh

Mike

 

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4 minutes ago, junkandcattle said:

1256pickett beat me to it . Wifey said pork chops were done. Priorities you know

..its all good   J&C   ......"Wifey" '   demand's have to be met....:)   Thanks to you both.....Hope you liked that song.....I guess there are plenty of good folk over yonder , that have distant   relatives   that fought and died in that conflict.....:(\

Mike

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It's sad. Had a couple WW2 vets who farmed near us. They gone. There are none left in the two towns I live between. Like anyone, you think they will be around forever. I sure regret not visiting with some of them. I did visit with our neighbor across the section about his service. That was back in the 80's. He served in the pacific. He had to check the caves for survivors after they used the flame throwers in them. He said quite often they were not burned. It just sucked the oxygen out of the cave. People in todays world would be appalled what it takes to win a war. Those guys did what they needed to do. And won.

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One of dad's friends was in a ship when it was attacked at pearl harbor. 

Another was a marine in the pacific. His first combat was at Guadalcanal. He lied about his age and joined several years early.

Another spent several years as a Japanese POW.

Dad was a coxswain for a small landing craft.

Many stories i remember them telling.

Thx-Ace 

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Wow cedar good post,  nobody who understands war could be appalled by what it takes to win a war, but people who don’t really understand war should be appalled at how little it takes to start a war and total waste that is accomplished by such.

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9 hours ago, acem said:

Dad and many of his friends served in WW2. They all served in the pacific. Uncle Neil was a b17 crewman in the army air corps of England. He was a great guy buy a little crazy. He was lucky to make it. I also met a German army vet. 

I don't know any WW2 vets that are still alive...

Thx-Ace 

In our small town a mfg company was started by two German army veterans that emigrated here from Canada in the 60s. It is rugby mfg . They are a nationally distributed hoist and truck body mfg. I a small town 35 miles away was a polish doctor who was very knowledgeable in skin diseases and allergies plus being a general family doctor. His daughter wrote a small biography of his life. He was educated in Austria at one of the best medical schools. He was forced to be a doctor for Adolph Hitler in the early to middle part of the war. He then emigrated to the USA after war. Applying at hospitals in many towns along his journey to ND. Every hospital refused to hire him as he was a German speaking immigrant. Somehow he found the towns and settlements in the German areas of North Dakota and settled in a town that accepted him as a highly trained doctor. He stayed and lived in the town of Drake ND his entire career. He was a highly trained doctor just looking for a job.  My dad used to talk about a cousin of his friends that emigrated after the war. He was conscripted by the German army in the Ukraine . He had a German army tattoo on his arm , but came over here and built a life for himself.

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Unfortunately not many WW2 survivors left from a generation we will be eternally grateful to, my Uncle has been gone 20 years now, served with artillery anti tank in Italy for much of it, he would get to telling stories which I keenly miss amongst other great personal attributes RIP Al❤️

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Kenneth sagely was asleep on a ship at pearl when explosions woke him up. He thought the ships boiler was blowing up so he ran topside and saw the Japs bombing. He ran back below and manned his battle station. 

Don Abbott was a too young marine. As a member of a browning 1919 machine gun crew he carried a steel plate to place under the tripod. On the sandy beach the tripod would bury itself into the sand so they brought a steel plate to float it. One time when he stepped off the landing craft they were stuck on a coral reef just short of the beach. He stepped into water way over his head and quickly sank to the bottom with the steel plate strapped to his back. He ran along the bottom, holding his breath until he was in shadow enough water that he could breathe again! Often he spoke fondly of the south pacific islands and their people. It started my desire to sail there.

I forget the name of Dad's friend who was a Japanese POW.  They were treated very poorly by the Japs. The island he was on was short on all supplies because  American submarines were sinking the cargo ships that supplied them. The Jap soldiers didn't have enough to eat so the POWs only got a thin soup made from food unfit for the soldiers to eat. They became weak after being starved for a long time.  Sometimes his soup would contain a soybean seed. With a pained expression on his face he said "if I could just get one soybean in my soup, I felt better that day".  He barely survived the war and was emotionally damaged but livedafull life.

Dad piloted a small landing craft in the pacific. He would dump off a load of marines at the beach. Then he would return to the troop ship for another load. He would fire his M1 carbine over their heads as they unloaded. They used the small landing craft to lay smoke screens around the big ships. He laid smoke much more than landing marines. He was involved in the invasion of the Philippines and Okinawa. Okinawa looked like the surface of the mood after the battle was over. Craters everywhere and nothing alive. Everyone was grateful the bomb ended the war before they invaded Japan. His enlistment was ' for the duration of the war' but he signed up for six months extra months to help take surrender of the Japanese military. He served mostly in Shanghai. He hated the Japs but loved China. He went to college on the gi bill then ended up in the Korean War but that's another story.

Thx-Ace 

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I don't usually chime in here as most of the time I'm on the construction board with TD9 issues. But today is D Day and we should never forget those who served and those that payed the ultimate price. 

My Dad was in WW 2, his brother in Italy, cousins flying bombers from England into Germany etc etc. 

Grandfather's cousin was 19, Canadian air force, and on a ship still in Canadian waters between Nova Scotia and Newfoundland when a German u boat torpedoed them. Google the SS Caribou. That's how close within Canada the Germans were in 1942. 

But today it was Juno, Sword, Omaha, Utah, Gold beaches in France.  Brits, Yanks, Canucks side by side.  Lest we forget.

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Dad used to say how everyone on his base knew something was up. The amount of equipment that was coming in was mind boggling, being on a depot/receiving base he saw a lot of it arriving. Huge amounts of new aircraft were arriving and soon they were all painting the invasion stripes on the wings. "That's when we really knew the invasion was coming soon" he said. First they painted P47's and P51"s and then scores of C47's  and then just about every aircraft you can think of. He remembered seeing jeeps lined up under tree lined roads stretching for miles, tanks, 6x6 trucks virtually everything imaginable in seemingly endless streams. Americas industrial might at its peak.

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My uncle served in Europe, drafted. Never talked about it even to my father even though they were close. He passed in a farming accident 20 some years ago when I was in my early 20s. I always felt he showed a special interest in my life even though I’m sure he was that way with all my cousins and siblings. I always wish I had been closer to him, the way my father was. 

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