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HEY! Where did all my oil go?


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Heard something go pop in the utility truck today, looking around got no oil pressure. Left a bit of a blood trail but the road was wet so hard to tell exactly where it started. But I think it was about 3-400 yards. Dip stick shows no oil but was oily when i pulled it out. Has an oil cooler line hanging, so I suspect that to be my culprit… further autopsy will tell more. ?. I sincerely hope I didn’t do damage to the engine, didn’t hear knocking or anything and it was running smoothly when i shut it off. That truck has always had terrific oil pressure, idles along hot at about 50, 60+ Under load. I just ordered new cooler lines but won’t have until next week ?

 

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Good thing it made a noise or you'd likely be a few miles down the road listening to funny engine noises, or worse!

My hearing is so bad I probably wouldn't have heard anything and if not alerted by an idiot light would go some distance before I noticed low oil pressure, especially in traffic!

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My 92 K3500 with 6.5 did that too. The oil cooler lines have snap ring type retainers that hold them into the fittings on the engine block and like to fail. I lost almost all of the oil. I got a different hose and fitting and drove it another 100000 miles after that.  

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6 minutes ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

My 92 K3500 with 6.5 did that too. The oil cooler lines have snap ring type retainers that hold them into the fittings on the engine block and like to fail. I lost almost all of the oil. I got a different hose and fitting and drove it another 100000 miles after that.  

My 2003 K2500 lines were leaking and corroded pretty badly so they, along with the brake and fuel lines, all got replaced, most with aftermarket. Salt is a terrible thing here. I think the gas engine in mine had a bolt on plate for the cooler lines but it was the hoses that were leaking at the crimps. That's the only area where they weren't corroded!

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This actually blew apart at the crimp, new ones on the way but not until next week… not one thing it is another with old equipment. 

image.jpg

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33 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

This actually blew apart at the crimp, new ones on the way but not until next week… not one thing it is another with old equipment. 

image.jpg

They are a filthy mess to change. That was a must change with any engine work and back 15 years ago always used gm sourced hoses. The wire clips can work out if not installed correctly.

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3 minutes ago, dale560 said:

They are a filthy mess to change. That was a must change with any engine work and back 15 years ago always used gm sourced hoses. The wire clips can work out if not installed correctly.

Any correct installation advice? Or do you just mean they need to be properly seated? 

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I'm guessing you weren't far from home! Good thing! At my old job we had a few 6.5's and one employee ( "It aint my truck") had a cooler line let go on I81. One Jasper engine later it was back on the road.?

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9 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

Any correct installation advice? Or do you just mean they need to be properly seated? 

There are seals in the fittings , pipe pushes in then clip slips into groove on back side. Pretty straight forward. You might want to get oil filter base gaskets and the 2 screw in fittings. One is longer on some applications. If I remember it was easier to drop filter housing down then replace everything

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Never done them on a 6.5, but put new ones on my 96, 97, 98 350's. Not a pleasant job, especially on 4x4.

Had same failure as you on the 98 Suburban, don't know how far I went without oil pressure. The Napa line was only a few months old too.

After repair, I drove it to work and back, then pulled my oil filter off and cut it open, inspected for debris. It ended up ok. I also sent an oil sample to the lab after a 1000 miles to be sure. I think people underestimate how long the oil in the galleys and such can carry an engine that is in good condition. 

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16 minutes ago, stronger800 said:

So hose clamps are a no go here?  I’d probably go with two camps, for safety.   Cut the end off, “flare” the steel a but with a screwdriver.... 

 

monitor for leaks. 

No not really and a not a good location with room for clamps. Exhaust cro

 

6 minutes ago, Cattech said:

Never done them on a 6.5, but put new ones on my 96, 97, 98 350's. Not a pleasant job, especially on 4x4.

Had same failure as you on the 98 Suburban, don't know how far I went without oil pressure. The Napa line was only a few months old too.

After repair, I drove it to work and back, then pulled my oil filter off and cut it open, inspected for debris. It ended up ok. I also sent an oil sample to the lab after a 1000 miles to be sure. I think people underestimate how long the oil in the galleys and such can carry an engine that is in good condition. 

9 miles on a 59 gmc truck with no oil in pan. 75 miles on a 4.3 in a 90 Chevy s10 blazer with 2 qts of oil. The truck was my grandpas, he drained oil never refilled it left for town. The s10 was along the hwy with three young married ladies. They left their home to stay in one of parents place nearby. The husband had oil change service station in their hometown. The helper only put 2 qts of oil in and changed filter sent them on their way. Dads buddy found them along road and we pulled them to yard

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2 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

This actually blew apart at the crimp, new ones on the way but not until next week… not one thing it is another with old equipment. 

image.jpg

Mine were leaking at those crimps. Rock Auto had GM. Gas engine has a block the bolts to the engine.

Brake lines I replaced with SS aftermarket. A vehicle should go to the grave with original lines. Mine were so rusted they broke in multiple places when I changed them. They're a B, even on my lift.

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1 hour ago, stronger800 said:

So hose clamps are a no go here?  I’d probably go with two camps, for safety.   Cut the end off, “flare” the steel a but with a screwdriver.... 

 

monitor for leaks. 

Yea, got plenty of room to work too. I was thinking slightly more complicated, compression x pipe thread + hose barb. 

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Local old timer made it 7 miles all up hill with his fairly new 7.3 diesel when the quickly lube place  never put oil back in it. They paid for new engine, from dealer. 

I added three quarts of oil to a Honda Civic with 250k on it for a young female coworker once in the parking lot. Three quarts didn’t quite fill it.  I know it only called for 3.6 or 3.8 quarts total capacity.  Had 300k on it last I seen it. 

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9 minutes ago, stronger800 said:

Exactly that too. Hydraulic shop would have a fitting that could be mated to that line  once cut off. 

Yea new might be better, but waiting for parts vs rigged back together and rolling in minutes.....

At the moment i can make due with my pickup, got 3 underground services to do in the next week, so hauling machinery and conduit around works ok with just the pickup and toolbox, and have the van. Thinking some of trading both in , but not right now, I really want a cab and 1/2 and would prefer a dually. Considering a new 7.3 ford but am reluctant and the cost is outrageous, i also thought some of an 06-7ish gm 8.1 if I could find one rust free and reasonable miles. I like big gas and don't want a diesel. My 14’ 2500 has treated me well and i like it but need more room. 

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It is trying to commit hari-kari.

Its thinking about coming back to shave 27 virgins!! 

As stronger800 said flair it and clamp it.

Done it many times on the old junkers or as a road side repair.

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31 minutes ago, stronger800 said:

Local old timer made it 7 miles all up hill with his fairly new 7.3 diesel when the quickly lube place  never put oil back in it. They paid for new engine, from dealer. 

I added three quarts of oil to a Honda Civic with 250k on it for a young female coworker once in the parking lot. Three quarts didn’t quite fill it.  I know it only called for 3.6 or 3.8 quarts total capacity.  Had 300k on it last I seen it. 

The 7.3L diesel must have been an IDI with an injection pump, a PSD with HEUI injectors won't run without oil pumping into the injectors.  Guys on the Turbo Diesel Register were talking smack about the PSD one day.  One guy said "You NEVER hear of a Cummins twisting an oil pump driveshaft like you do a Power Joke."  I informed him that in typical IH design fashion the oil pump in a 7.3 PSD is mounted in the front cover of the engine and driven by the crankshaft, the whole snout of the crankshaft would have to break off.  I was surprised, He apologized!

   On my '96 F-250 the first fluid line to rust out was the power steering line that normally blows out of the power steering pump, the Teflon sealing washer "extrudes" till it blows out. So I backed out of the shop, parked next to the road,  terrible oily mess on the shop floor, got the lawn mower out and mowed, put the mower away and drove the truck back in. Next morning installed the new line I'd bought years before.

  Next line was one of the two fuel lines, the pressure line, not the return line that runs up the driver's side front corner of the engine block. SON helped me with that, We ended up replacing all the fuel lines including the stainless flex lines and all the hoses between the fuel delivery pump, PSI regulator and filter in the BLACK VALLEY OF DEATH. The OEM fuel lines I got from my FORD STORE didn't last very long, within 2 years we replaced them again, along with the fuel pump. I was shocked how clean the fuel filter canister was,  and we removed the fuel heater, it was marked 40W, 40 watts wouldn't warm very much fuel if it was really cold.  While putting the fuel lines in we "touched" a brake line on the inside of the left frame rail, it cracked, broke, drained the whole master cylinder.  I ordered a complete set of stainless steel replacement brake lines from Classic Industies, had the truck hauled to a shop in town and he replaced all the lines, master cylinder, both rear wheel cylinders and both frt calipers. And the ONLY rusty line left was from the clutch master cylinder to the slave cylinder and SON and I replaced that 2 years ago.

   I REALLY wish FORD would have made ALL those tubes out of stainless steel instead of Recycled 8N tractors that corrode!

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37 minutes ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

I REALLY wish FORD would have made ALL those tubes out of stainless steel instead of Recycled 8N tractors that corrode!

And just like that, the market for used 8N's dried up.........................???

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40 minutes ago, stronger800 said:

Oil less 7.3 was a ‘97 I believe.  

94 1/2 to mid 2003 for 7.3 PSD. Ford should have stayed with it, would have been worth all the retooling stuff for emissions. Right around 6 quarts low they will start acting up, 8 quarts down it won't run. Hold 15 qts, good thing .....

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6 hours ago, Cattech said:

Never done them on a 6.5, but put new ones on my 96, 97, 98 350's. Not a pleasant job, especially on 4x4.

Had same failure as you on the 98 Suburban, don't know how far I went without oil pressure. The Napa line was only a few months old too.

After repair, I drove it to work and back, then pulled my oil filter off and cut it open, inspected for debris. It ended up ok. I also sent an oil sample to the lab after a 1000 miles to be sure. I think people underestimate how long the oil in the galleys and such can carry an engine that is in good condition. 

I seem to remember years ago one oil company did a test on mileage with a vehicle drained of oil and how their lubricity coated  everything and would not fail even when empty, ever since I started doing repairs I’ve never seen my brake lines fail, but we are fairly lucky with salted or brine covered roads not the norm.

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6 hours ago, dale560 said:

There are seals in the fittings , pipe pushes in then clip slips into groove on back side. Pretty straight forward. You might want to get oil filter base gaskets and the 2 screw in fittings. One is longer on some applications. If I remember it was easier to drop filter housing down then replace everything

X2 I changed a set on my 93 gasser and could not stop the leak near the filter. Local mechanic said he could not afford to reuse them. Too much lost labor doing it a second time

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