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9350 injector and valve settings


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Going to install new injectors in 95 model year 9350. When removing the rockers and injectors rotated the accessory drive pulley to letter A and number 6 was on TDC and rotated 360 to get number 1 on TDC. This engine is a LTA10-A external damper. Most 9350 tractors had M11 I thought. The only specs and sequence I have is for L10 internal damper which shows number 5 and 2 cylinders on TDC when A comes around on accessory drive. I have info for QSM11 which has 1 and 6 on TDC when on A on accessory drive pulley. So far no help from Cummins dealer and never done a LTA10-A so needing to know correct specs and sequence for this 9350. Thanks for any info. 

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Most 9350s did have an M11. However, it wouldn't surprise me that a 95 model 9350 has a different engine. I have a couple 95 model 9380s around here with an 855 with STC(Step Timing Control), instead of the N14s that most 9370/80/90s had for engines. That engine is very hard to find much information from...even from Cummins. I also have a 95 model 9370 around here with a regular 855 Cummins(just like those used in the 9270/80s). Typical 855, the sun disappears every time you start it from the smoke, especially in cooler temperatures. Also, I have an early 9330(I assume its a 95 model) around here that has a non-emissionized engine that has the same specs as an early 7240 Magnum. Most 9330s had an emissionized 8.3L engine that was the same as those used in an 8940 Magnum as well as a 2366 combine. However, I don't have an early 9350s around here that I know of.

In the case of the 855s I mentioned in the early 9380s, when I did the overhead on them I had to call direct into Cummins in Columbus, Indiana, to get information for setting the overhead(valves & injectors). Seems like I had to call the Cummins 1-800-DIESELS phone# to get me in the right direction to find someone with the info I needed. That's been 10-15 years ago....to my knowledge the phone # still works to get in touch with Cummins.

Question....if you look at the engine data tag, is there a spec. listed for injector setting? If it has Top Stop injectors, the tag should say either "TS Zero lash" or else it might say "5-6 inch lbs"...I've seen it listed both ways.

Also, does this engine have STC(Step Timing Control)? That will affect injector setting as well.

There's also a guy who frequents on here that works for Cummins in Columbus that might be able to help you. His name is Andy, his handle on here is 806 Southern Indiana. He's helped me out on matters like this over the years. Top notch guy. Might want to have your engine serial # with you when you pursue this. 

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40 minutes ago, SDman said:

Most 9350s did have an M11. However, it wouldn't surprise me that a 95 model 9350 has a different engine. I have a couple 95 model 9380s around here with an 855 with STC(Step Timing Control), instead of the N14s that most 9370/80/90s had for engines. That engine is very hard to find much information from...even from Cummins. I also have a 95 model 9370 around here with a regular 855 Cummins(just like those used in the 9270/80s). Typical 855, the sun disappears every time you start it from the smoke, especially in cooler temperatures. Also, I have an early 9330(I assume its a 95 model) around here that has a non-emissionized engine that has the same specs as an early 7240 Magnum. Most 9330s had an emissionized 8.3L engine that was the same as those used in an 8940 Magnum as well as a 2366 combine. However, I don't have an early 9350s around here that I know of.

In the case of the 855s I mentioned in the early 9380s, when I did the overhead on them I had to call direct into Cummins in Columbus, Indiana, to get information for setting the overhead(valves & injectors). Seems like I had to call the Cummins 1-800-DIESELS phone# to get me in the right direction to find someone with the info I needed. That's been 10-15 years ago....to my knowledge the phone # still works to get in touch with Cummins.

Question....if you look at the engine data tag, is there a spec. listed for injector setting? If it has Top Stop injectors, the tag should say either "TS Zero lash" or else it might say "5-6 inch lbs"...I've seen it listed both ways.

Also, does this engine have STC(Step Timing Control)? That will affect injector setting as well.

There's also a guy who frequents on here that works for Cummins in Columbus that might be able to help you. His name is Andy, his handle on here is 806 Southern Indiana. He's helped me out on matters like this over the years. Top notch guy. Might want to have your engine serial # with you when you pursue this. 

My cement buddy has a bunch of trucks with l10 step timing and m11s. He had a couple of the 855 with step timing. Luckily we had a motor manual for those years that covered step timing. I know the oil pressure regulator will stick and mess with injectors.

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On that engine you will adjust valves on one cylinder and the injector on another cylinder depending on if you are on A B or C.  I just overhauled a LTA260 with STC timing control in a dump truck a month or so ago.  I  have the book for that engine.  You may want to get a Cummins quick serve account.  You should be able to enter your engine serial number and get the access to the service manual.  If your engine is the STC I could take pictures of the pages for the overhead set if needed.  

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Cummins engines are kind of weird. The A B C timing marks are a throwback to the way old engines. The abc are valve set not tdc marks for those cylinders. The odd thing is long ,long ago on the old engines you set the valves for corresponding cylinder and the injector on cylinder next in firing order. The modern engines if I remember you set the valves on the next cylinder and the injector  2 down the order. Then you get into newer n14 electric the valve set is different again than the new engines are different again. Do not follow these graphs just putting it up to show some of the sequence to set valves. If you look at pulleys on some engines there is also a tdc mark.

239C05A4-975F-4D34-ADBF-570D2503C1C4.png

63BD00F7-17F4-44F6-8304-C5A1EA5D092C.png

BA9ED959-7939-4387-B1EF-BF959F0DBFF4.png

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In regards to adjusting valves/injectors on Cummins engines with camshaft-operated injectors, it boils down to 2 different ways to adjust the injectors....OBC(Outer Base Circle, meaning the injector is down, or in its firing position) or IBC(Inner Base Circle, meaning the injector is all the way up, or in its non-firing position). IBC or OBC is referring to which part of the cam lobe the injector follower is on....IBC means its on the small part(no lift) of the lobe, OBC means the injector follower is on the high part(full lift) of the cam lobe. 

If you are adjusting injectors using the OBC method, you can adjust the valves and injectors on the same cylinder, since the injector will be firing at #1 TDC, which is also when you are adjusting the valves for the same cylinder. If you are adjusting IBC, you can't adjust valves/injectors on the same cylinder because the injector is firing. Usually on IBC engines, you are adjusting the injector for the cylinder behind the cylinder on TDC as the injector is in position to begin firing the next cylinder in the firing order.

In some instances, Cummins has actually changed their recommendations on settings for the same engine through the years. The N14 STC engine used in the 9370/80/90 CaseIH Steigers is a perfect example. Originally, they wanted you to set the injectors using IBC method, so you set them 5-6 in. lbs. With this setup, you set valves and injectors on different cylinders at the same mark on the engine accessory drive pulley. Later on, they changed the injector setting to OBC method, meaning you set the injector when it was bottomed out in the cup to 125 inch lbs. When you set the overhead this way, you set the valves and injector on the same cylinder at the same mark on the accessory drive pulley. It was felt that adjusting the injectors in the firing position(OBC method) was a more accurate way of setting the injectors overall.

Now, getting back to the OP with his L-10, all the L10s and M11s I ever seen in the Steigers were set with Top Stop injectors on the IBC method, so you set them at 5-6 in. lbs. Now, with the STC injectors on the M11s in the 9350s, you also needed another tool(everybody called it a "horseshoe") that would lock the STC tappet solid in the injector so you could set the injector lash properly. I assume the L10 with STC uses the same tool.

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1 hour ago, SDman said:

In regards to adjusting valves/injectors on Cummins engines with camshaft-operated injectors, it boils down to 2 different ways to adjust the injectors....OBC(Outer Base Circle, meaning the injector is down, or in its firing position) or IBC(Inner Base Circle, meaning the injector is all the way up, or in its non-firing position). IBC or OBC is referring to which part of the cam lobe the injector follower is on....IBC means its on the small part(no lift) of the lobe, OBC means the injector follower is on the high part(full lift) of the cam lobe. 

If you are adjusting injectors using the OBC method, you can adjust the valves and injectors on the same cylinder, since the injector will be firing at #1 TDC, which is also when you are adjusting the valves for the same cylinder. If you are adjusting IBC, you can't adjust valves/injectors on the same cylinder because the injector is firing. Usually on IBC engines, you are adjusting the injector for the cylinder behind the cylinder on TDC as the injector is in position to begin firing the next cylinder in the firing order.

In some instances, Cummins has actually changed their recommendations on settings for the same engine through the years. The N14 STC engine used in the 9370/80/90 CaseIH Steigers is a perfect example. Originally, they wanted you to set the injectors using IBC method, so you set them 5-6 in. lbs. With this setup, you set valves and injectors on different cylinders at the same mark on the engine accessory drive pulley. Later on, they changed the injector setting to OBC method, meaning you set the injector when it was bottomed out in the cup to 125 inch lbs. When you set the overhead this way, you set the valves and injector on the same cylinder at the same mark on the accessory drive pulley. It was felt that adjusting the injectors in the firing position(OBC method) was a more accurate way of setting the injectors overall.

Now, getting back to the OP with his L-10, all the L10s and M11s I ever seen in the Steigers were set with Top Stop injectors on the IBC method, so you set them at 5-6 in. lbs. Now, with the STC injectors on the M11s in the 9350s, you also needed another tool(everybody called it a "horseshoe") that would lock the STC tappet solid in the injector so you could set the injector lash properly. I assume the L10 with STC uses the same tool.

Yes.  That tool is used on the L10 with STC. Thank you for this information.  We have about 10 M11 ISM and N14 engines at work that I have worked on.  I have fairly new books and follow the procedures in them.  On the L10 STC my book has me adjusting them IBC.  The M11 and ISM we have are electronic book has you adjusting valves and injectors on same cylinder which leads me to believe is OBC.  I always adjust the valves on them with the Cummins 6 inch pound torque wrench method.  I think it provides a more consistent result when running the overhead.  

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