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Cylinder stroke stop blocks


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Maybe a dumb question but maybe good conversation as well. 

Everyone here probably uses the aluminum snap on cylinder stop blocks or stroke control blocks. I've always just used them on single acting cylinders such as Bush hog or other things. I see lots of guys use them on double acting cylinders as well and get away with it.  I'd like to use them on my disk so that when I want to carry it I can do so without feathering it around each time i set it down or staring back at the rod to determine where it is. I have never used the stop blocks in fear i would wreck the cylinder head or pull the yoke off the rod. My krause uses a 24"x4 with 2" rod. cylinder so I dont want to trash it. I could remove the one hose however when I want to cut hard I do want it to lift my wheels so the weight of the wheels helps push down so making it a single acting cylinder isn't a good option either. 

So my question is, how many guys use blocks on double acting cylinders and have you ran into trouble tearing themselves up?? Maybe I'm just overthinking it. 

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I have used stop blocks on a the double acting cylinder on my stalk chopper from day one. Tearing up the cylinder is not a concern. However, the stop blocks will get beat to death pretty quickly if some precautions are not taken. 1) Turn down the flow to that circuit if possible. Best to move the cylinder as slow as is practical. 2) Usually you will use a combination of thick and thin blocks to get the desired setting. Make sure the thin stops are in the middle of the group. The thick stops can take the pounding better. 

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12 minutes ago, Gearclash said:

I have used stop blocks on a the double acting cylinder on my stalk chopper from day one. Tearing up the cylinder is not a concern. However, the stop blocks will get beat to death pretty quickly if some precautions are not taken. 1) Turn down the flow to that circuit if possible. Best to move the cylinder as slow as is practical. 2) Usually you will use a combination of thick and thin blocks to get the desired setting. Make sure the thin stops are in the middle of the group. The thick stops can take the pounding better. 

 

            X2

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I had an IH 800 plow for a few years. 9 bottom. It was heavy and used 3 separate cylinders. I did the exact thing you want to do do for the same reason. 2 of the cylinders were 4x8 w/ 2 inch shaft, double acting. On those 2 cylinders I had a couple marked spacers I kept on them for depth stops. I never had any trouble with the cylinders, or spacers. 

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I use them on all four of my Glencoe field cultivators cylinders to keep the depth exact for incorporating. Never had a problem.

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I have some here that are cast iron, two pieces bolted to a piece of spring steel.................Don't know where they came from, never seen anything else like them.  I am not even sure where they are in my junk hole right now or I would put up a picture.

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i use them also. plus i have some cyl's that  have an adjustable end there in place of the blocks and i just unscrew it for depth i want .  have these on the seed drill and vibrashank. cause with out blocks or a setting you always have to correct the depth from the cyl. always deepening.  

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