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I am still relatively new to the forum and I have a question. I see people on here all the time asking about what tillage tool they should look for to purchase or what works best in certain situations. I hear people say that no-till does not work in their area and I was just wondering why? What does it do if you no-till? What were the crop damages it caused? Have large amounts of people tried it and given up in your area and went back to conventional tillage? Does anyone have side by side yield data? I have talked to a few people in person who told me that no-till doesn’t work on their farm. When I ask why it failed they just tell me that they never actually tried it, but know it doesn’t work. This is just a question I have had for a long time and never had a way to get an answer. This site is great for learning about how other farms operate and why they do what they do. Thanks in advance for all the replies  

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One of the important parts of making no till successful is having ample drainage.  Saturated dirt is not going to work for no till.  

Another thing about no till, use it as a tool for a purpose, not as a religion.  

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If the ground and crops you are planting work out with no till it's a pure economics and time advantage. 

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I no till when I can.

On my ground in the rice soybean rotation it is not really possible. I must put up levees for rice then take them down for soybeans. This ground is inherently wet so i raise soybeans on beds which takes more tillage. I tried planting the soybeans flat and just working the levees but it didn't work. Additionally this ground often gets rutted up at harvest and tillage is required to smooth it out. Still, I reduce my tillage when I can.

On my corn(or milo)/wheat/soybean ground i use no till as much as possible. I don't use tillage unless the ground is rutted up or something else is wrong.

I find no till really helps on clay soils. It is more challenging on my silt loam soils.

No till is much better for the soil and environment even on my flat fields.

Thx-Ace 

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4 minutes ago, acem said:

I no till when I can.

On my ground in the rice soybean rotation it is not really possible. I must put up levees for rice then take them down for soybeans. This ground is inherently wet so i raise soybeans on beds which takes more tillage. I tried planting the soybeans flat and just working the levees but it didn't work. Additionally this ground often gets rutted up at harvest and tillage is required to smooth it out. Still, I reduce my tillage when I can.

On my corn(or milo)/wheat/soybean ground i use no till as much as possible. I don't use tillage unless the ground is rutted up or something else is wrong.

I find no till really helps on clay soils. It is more challenging on my silt loam soils.

No till is much better for the soil and environment even on my flat fields.

Thx-Ace 

I never even thought about what the ground would be like after rice. I have never even seen rice growing before. I can see how that wouldn’t work. 

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15 minutes ago, bitty said:

If the ground and crops you are planting work out with no till it's a pure economics and time advantage. 

When we used to raise Burley tobacco they had no till setters available, but I didn’t see how they would work for us. It was mainly because of weed control. It just had to be cultivated to keep it clean. We always used a moldboard plow on that ground. No till on everything else and I was glad because of the time it saved. 

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I have a neighbor who plants everything flat and no till works good for him. 

We use cover crops as well. Volunteer winter annuals are our cover crop of choice.

Oddly enough I know people who do full fall tillage and cover crops.

Thx-Ace 

 

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2 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I am still relatively new to the forum and I have a question. I see people on here all the time asking about what tillage tool they should look for to purchase or what works best in certain situations. I hear people say that no-till does not work in their area and I was just wondering why? What does it do if you no-till? What were the crop damages it caused? Have large amounts of people tried it and given up in your area and went back to conventional tillage? Does anyone have side by side yield data? I have talked to a few people in person who told me that no-till doesn’t work on their farm. When I ask why it failed they just tell me that they never actually tried it, but know it doesn’t work. This is just a question I have had for a long time and never had a way to get an answer. This site is great for learning about how other farms operate and why they do what they do. Thanks in advance for all the replies  

from our experience going no till, mind you this is crop share on 1/3 - 2/3 we have not really noticed a big deal of diff on our 80 acres of beans in profits or yields - still fertilizing, still spraying 2 or 3 times for weeds, pre burn with chemical before drilling, so who really knows. 

I guess the guy that farms it might save some fuel but the odd part is he has started disc/harrow before seeding last couple yrs vs chemical burns i think chemicals have gotten high enough its cheaper for him to do the dirt work on this smaller acreage ? I am tired of the management - get 2 or 4 chem bills, fertilizer, combining, hauling, seed, blah blah and put my 40 in CRP wtih a fixed return which over my past years will net me way more due to poor returns from flooding and crop loss, its a creek bottom so flood/crop ins is not a viable option. Good years we get 45bu beans, bad years we go in the hole obviously. Dad is going to keep his in beans, his has a lil less flood areas and mine will help protect his some with the CRP/NRCS work I will be doing. 

 

 

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From experience slugs can be a issue, as can slow ground warm up in certain springs which cause issues with even plant emergence.  Nothing wrong with no-till, but in low ground here, you can actually do some tillage pretty quickly and don't have the two issues above, especially slugs and it pays in the long run.  As with anything else, you have to know what tools to use where.......................As much as I love to moldboard, I will have corn getting no-tilled in next spring, and the major reason I don't want to deal with rocks as after the corn it is going back to hay and its pretty darn smooth now.  

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45 minutes ago, TP from Central PA said:

From experience slugs can be a issue, as can slow ground warm up in certain springs which cause issues with even plant emergence.  Nothing wrong with no-till, but in low ground here, you can actually do some tillage pretty quickly and don't have the two issues above, especially slugs and it pays in the long run.  As with anything else, you have to know what tools to use where.......................As much as I love to moldboard, I will have corn getting no-tilled in next spring, and the major reason I don't want to deal with rocks as after the corn it is going back to hay and its pretty darn smooth now.  

Just goes to show you how different things are in other parts of the country. I’ve never even heard of slugs being so bad that they cause problems. I think I’ve only seen a handful of them in my entire life! Does the tillage actually kill them or just destroy the habitat or what? I would be a fish out of water in some of these situations, I wouldn’t know what to do. 

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Works for me. Tried the plant green deal this year.

 

Yes, tillage destroys slug habitat. I found some slug damage this year, but not enough to scare me.

20210520_151724.jpg

20210517_085922.jpg

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24 minutes ago, Scott! said:

Works for me. Tried the plant green deal this year.

 

Yes, tillage destroys slug habitat. I found some slug damage this year, but not enough to scare me.

20210520_151724.jpg

20210517_085922.jpg

How tough is it to kill slugs? Can something be added to the burn down tank mix that will kill them?

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18 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

How tough is it to kill slugs? Can something be added to the burn down tank mix that will kill them?

So you add another chemical to kill Slugs plus broadleaf plants plus grassy plants. Maybe you need to add a little IRON to your field. 
I made a living for quite a number of years selling ag chemicals and I know their benefits, but I also know there’s times when a piece of iron can do more than any amount of crap you can throw at it. 
Again, there’s a place for no til, strip till, minimum till, and full blown tillage. 
I have issues with people who preach that the way they farm is the only way possible to make money. Until you farm every piece of someone else’s ground, you should make suggestions and leave it at that. 
 

Sorry for the rant, and it is geared at myself as much as anyone.  

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16 minutes ago, Lazy WP said:

So you add another chemical to kill Slugs plus broadleaf plants plus grassy plants. Maybe you need to add a little IRON to your field. 
I made a living for quite a number of years selling ag chemicals and I know their benefits, but I also know there’s times when a piece of iron can do more than any amount of crap you can throw at it. 
Again, there’s a place for no til, strip till, minimum till, and full blown tillage. 
I have issues with people who preach that the way they farm is the only way possible to make money. Until you farm every piece of someone else’s ground, you should make suggestions and leave it at that. 
 

Sorry for the rant, and it is geared at myself as much as anyone.  

Do they make a spray for killing rattlesnakes ? Asking for a friend

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7 minutes ago, bitty said:

Do they make a spray for killing rattlesnakes ? Asking for a friend

Off label, but I am betting Furodan probably would. Maybe a high rate of Lorsban??

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52 minutes ago, Lazy WP said:

So you add another chemical to kill Slugs plus broadleaf plants plus grassy plants.

Everything that was ever tried around me didn't come cheap...............If it was even available.  Planting green certainly helps..................Another thing in my observations was guys putting down liquid manure didn't have any issues either, it was a natural "fry oil" for them.  

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1 minute ago, TP from Central PA said:

Everything that was ever tried around me didn't come cheap...............If it was even available.  Planting green certainly helps..................Another thing in my observations was guys putting down liquid manure didn't have any issues either, it was a natural "fry oil" for them.  

Liquid manure didn't solve slug problems here . We don't often have issues with slugs . Armyworm 2 years in the last 30 have been bad , I think once back when we were doing tillage even

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It's nearly impossible to kill slugs because they only come out at night. My SUPER full tillage buddy had slugs a few times. He top dressed potash at midnight a couple times. It definitely killed some slugs, but not sure where the economic thresholds were met. Either way you needed to add potash eventually. LOL

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1 hour ago, Lazy WP said:

So you add another chemical to kill Slugs plus broadleaf plants plus grassy plants. Maybe you need to add a little IRON to your field. 
I made a living for quite a number of years selling ag chemicals and I know their benefits, but I also know there’s times when a piece of iron can do more than any amount of crap you can throw at it. 
Again, there’s a place for no til, strip till, minimum till, and full blown tillage. 
I have issues with people who preach that the way they farm is the only way possible to make money. Until you farm every piece of someone else’s ground, you should make suggestions and leave it at that. 
 

Sorry for the rant, and it is geared at myself as much as anyone.  

I said up front that I was not familiar with having slugs in a field. I was asking a question not giving management advice. I don’t understand why asking questions about farming practices, especially about tillage or lack thereof, in other parts of the country is the same as insulting someone’s mother. I haven’t been on here a long time, but I haven’t seen anyone suggest, in this thread anyway, that the way they are doing it is the only way. Maybe there has been some conversations on here that I just was not a part of and that is where you are coming from. 

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6 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

When we used to raise Burley tobacco they had no till setters available, but I didn’t see how they would work for us. It was mainly because of weed control. It just had to be cultivated to keep it clean. We always used a moldboard plow on that ground. No till on everything else and I was glad because of the time it saved. 

People are still try to no till tobacco here doesn’t look very good I don’t think they care if they get a good yield or not .

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2 minutes ago, ky966boy said:

People are still try to no till tobacco here doesn’t look very good I don’t think they care if they get a good yield or not .

The only place I ever saw good results, if you can call it that, was in a double crop situation after wheat. One guy would no till into wheat stubble around the fourth of July. Weed pressure was much less but that time of year and he didn’t have real high expectations for yield as a double crop anyway. 

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2 hours ago, bitty said:

Do they make a spray for killing rattlesnakes ? Asking for a friend

Not a snake killer , but a agent they don't like. I heard about it last year, saw it at TSC store a month or so ago. The fellow last year was not all that impressed. Had a house he was renting as vacation rental, 1/4 to 1/2 acre fenced yard. He sprayed perimeter not the whole yard, said maybe snakes where already inside. 

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1 hour ago, Scott! said:

It's nearly impossible to kill slugs because they only come out at night. My SUPER full tillage buddy had slugs a few times. He top dressed potash at midnight a couple times. It definitely killed some slugs, but not sure where the economic thresholds were met. Either way you needed to add potash eventually. LOL

How did he have slugs if the ground is black?????  They don't like heat and dry open areas????  Spraying Lanate(SP?) at dusk works, they crawl around it in, but usually when you need it so does everyone else so its hard to get.  

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....where I work part time on the Rainbow Station...........Everything  is "no till "....simply because introducing     "Iron " to the paddocks  would bring up millions of rocks...after all....the river flats were once river beds...end of story  !!

Probably around a thousand acres is seeded  every year...with  forage crops and new grass rotation.....  however, a lot of chemical is required to 'burn ' off old vegetation and for post planting weed control...

Mike

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I enjoy threads like this, I like to hear about what works for other farmers in their area.

We played around with no-till some when I was at the farm. The one thing I learned at least in our area is that timing is everything. You can have a very small window and it can slam shut very quickly. When the conditions are right you need to be ready to go and go.

Some of the more progressive farmers went no-till back in the 80s but the results were hit and miss. Everybody said back then no-till equals no yield. Since then there have been huge advancements in seed and equipment technology. One dairy went full no-till in the 90s and stayed with it for 20 years with success. There are a couple guys here now that are mostly no-till but they pull something over the dirt every once in a while to either level a field or manage residue.

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