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Ready to fly on a pilotless plane?


New Englander
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6 minutes ago, yellowrosefarm said:

Once you are at altitude how much pilot input is needed now?

Once the FMS is programmed and with no routing changes, weather deviations or abnormalities, not much.

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5 hours ago, New Englander said:

Once the FMS is programmed and with no routing changes, weather deviations or abnormalities, not much.

Once on a flight from Mexico City to Phoenix. Very few passengers and most on the line to the head. I set down with a guy in a wing seat and struck up a conversion. He was returning to Phoenix after a month of teaching the Mexican Air Force how to fly some surplus plane  that had been provided  to them by the US. 

He said that was a real interesting job, Pilot flying this thing, referring to the 737 we were on, is basically a bus driver carrying out a schedule.

Bus driver or not, I want a LIVE, WELL TRAINED, AIRCREW, ON THE PLANE.

Wasn't the computer the failure of the 737 in Indonesia that I blamed on the Aircrew?

 

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1 hour ago, oleman said:

Wasn't the computer the failure of the 737 in Indonesia that I blamed on the Aircrew?

Yeah, the save face blame was on the airplane but really it was failure of the aircrew and airline. Third world pilots are amongst the worse. Part of that is the training they don't receive. It's all rote. Monday is system failures, Tuesday is engine failures. Wednesday is flight controls, etc. Those guys have English as a second language and it's quite the handicap in training. The airlines involved just want warm bodies to keep the schedule going. It was a trim runaway! It's something I've been trained on since day one so the reaction is automatic, simple muscle memory. Had that happened to ANY US crew it simply would have been a non-event. I've been paired with third world pilots in the simulator and while some are good to excellent, most others, well, shouldn't be flying.

Boeing has some blame for expecting the crew to react properly and they cheaped it.

Yes, airline flying is more routine than most other. Under FAR 121 they are dispatched by a licensed dispatcher who shares responsibility for weather, alternates, fuel load, runway selection and performance, and weight and balance. The crew is handed a package with most of that stuff already done and it's their responsibility to double check everything. However, all that routine flying can turn to crap in a hurry and that's when pay is earned.

Flying a world wide business jet operation is a bigger challenge as the crew does most of the work the airline crew has done for them. Flying into a crap hole county can sometimes be like entering the twilight zone, and pay is earned.

This is the best account of the failures of the crew, the airlines involved, and Boeing. Don't be put off by the fact it was published in the Times. It's written by a guy who actually knows what he's talking about. You should be able to get a free read.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/18/magazine/boeing-737-max-crashes.html

 

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If someone can hack into a pipeline I would imagine they could hack into the flight control's of an automated 737. Then it becomes a guided missile. 

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How many WW2 pilots went commercial? Do very many pilots go over nowadays? Do they have to relearn old habits for safe habits? I remember when I first started driving FD trucks in the early ‘70s I had to forget a lot of stuff and relearn how to push a truck around town safely or safely for DMV standards.

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Good evening ladies and gentlemen....I am your captain, and I would like to welcome you aboard the worlds first, TOTALLY automated airline flight.

I am waiting at your destination to welcome you there.

Sit back and relax, and remember that absolutely NOTHING can go wrong------go wrong----go wrong-----go wrong------

Mike

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14 hours ago, Raildudes dad said:

An acquaintance of mine is a "bus driver" for SW. He has said the same thing as New Englander, he wasn't afraid to keep flying the 737's.

I have a friend who's a captain for American that flew them all the time. No problem. He said the same thing about the fact it's all in the training. He said the third world countries love the Airbus because it's all push button flying.

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