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Do you like your transmission fluid chunky or smooth?


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I personally prefer smooth, but today it was Chunky...?

i found this during a routine transmission service, it has not been acting up, its been about 15k since i changed it last. Only thing i can think of is that its some latching pawl.. I accidentally reverse dropped it at about 40 one day. The shifter is loose and the road was rough, i was trying to put it back in drive. Thats been well over a year.. so far nothing really strange. The truck stalled instantly, but restarted once i pulled over and put it in park. Otherwise it behaves normally 

95, chevy 3500 , 6.5, 4L80E. 
anyone have a notion what it is? Any suggestions about what to do? Im thinking I’ll just stuff it back together.. ? 

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5 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

I personally prefer smooth, but today it was Chunky...?

i found this during a routine transmission service, it has not been acting up, its been about 15k since i changed it last. Only thing i can think of is that its some latching pawl.. I accidentally reverse dropped it at about 40 one day. The shifter is loose and the road was rough, i was trying to put it back in drive. Thats been well over a year.. so far nothing really strange. The truck stalled instantly, but restarted once i pulled over and put it in park. Otherwise it behaves normally 

95, chevy 3500 , 6.5, 4L80E. 
anyone have a notion what it is? Any suggestions about what to do? Im thinking I’ll just stuff it back together.. ? 

Picture?

 

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3 minutes ago, New Englander said:

Picture?

 

Try again, they didn’t upload properly 

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I've watched a few of this guy's videos and he's a straight shooter. Here he's tearing down your transmission so you may see the suspect:

 

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I personally don't like slush boxes................Its like buying a slushee at different temperatures, you never know what might be in the bottom of the cup.

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53 minutes ago, TP from Central PA said:

I personally don't like slush boxes................Its like buying a slushee at different temperatures, you never know what might be in the bottom of the cup.

Not a big fan myself, dont see it makes much difference, chunks are chunks. In a 20+ year old truck from philly, just like a 20+ chick from philly, it stands a pretty darn good chance its been whomped on pretty darn hard by a wide range of people.... manual or auto, likely to find something wrong. 

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If it's part of the shifting linkage, you can see the linkage with the pan off. Because of what you said happened, it kind of looks more like part of the reverse band. Be better to damage the band than to rip the cast lugs off the inside of the case. Been awhile since I've been inside a 4L80E, but will be probably tearing one apart in about a month.

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14 minutes ago, ThirdGenRed said:

If it's part of the shifting linkage, you can see the linkage with the pan off. Because of what you said happened, it kind of looks more like part of the reverse band. Be better to damage the band than to rip the cast lugs off the inside of the case. Been awhile since I've been inside a 4L80E, but will be probably tearing one apart in about a month.

Could be and sounds logical. In the video above the reverse band appears around 26.41 and the engine braking band around 23.45. Could be part of the lugs.

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Doesn’t look right to me... sounds logical but i cant make it part of a round band no matter how many times I play the video back 

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So I have identified the part, still not sure what it exactly does or how it broke, I called the only trans shop I know of and am waiting for a call back. 

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I have that same transmission. At 206,000 the transmission failed and cost me almost $3000 for the total repair cost. I did no work myself it was a total job for the transmission shop. In all my years of vehicle ownership  I have never paid to have a manual Transmission repaired.  I am talking about a pickup sized vehicles. I am not sure that an automatic doesn't have built in destruction at a specific time.

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6 hours ago, New Englander said:

I've watched a few of this guy's videos and he's a straight shooter. Here he's tearing down your transmission so you may see the suspect:

 

I really like watching his videos, but I have yet to see him assemble one!

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4 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

So I have identified the part, still not sure what it exactly does or how it broke, I called the only trans shop I know of and am waiting for a call back. 

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The circled piece. Holds the park pawl rod in place. As you push it back the taper of the rod engages park pawl. Back 20 years ago we used to change 350 park pawls on regular basis. People would tow bar pickup behind equipment and leave it in park or jam them in park when moving. Looks like you found broken piece and have parts to fix it. We used to have to change pawl , you drove a little soft plug loose pulled pin out then swapped stuff out. 

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5 hours ago, ThirdGenRed said:

If it's part of the shifting linkage, you can see the linkage with the pan off. Because of what you said happened, it kind of looks more like part of the reverse band. Be better to damage the band than to rip the cast lugs off the inside of the case. Been awhile since I've been inside a 4L80E, but will be probably tearing one apart in about a month.

Not reverse band, none of it shaped like that. Looks like the back part of the park brake bracket. Had mine completely apart in December.

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28 minutes ago, dale560 said:

The circled piece. Holds the park pawl rod in place. As you push it back the taper of the rod engages park pawl. Back 20 years ago we used to change 350 park pawls on regular basis. People would tow bar pickup behind equipment and leave it in park or jam them in park when moving. Looks like you found broken piece and have parts to fix it. We used to have to change pawl , you drove a little soft plug loose pulled pin out then swapped stuff out. 

That part helps hold the park pawl linkage  in place. Just change the part, two bolts I believe.

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On 5/12/2021 at 6:29 PM, Ihfan4life said:

I really like watching his videos, but I have yet to see him assemble one!

I remembered he did one and went looking for it. He works about as fast building as a tear-down. Admittedly this was one he had already assembled, set clearances, etc., and disassembled again due popular demand.

 

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Yes, that piece can easily be replaced with the pan off.

You should be able to take out the two bolts and find the pieces that match the piece you have.

Should be an easy fix.

Far easier to replace this than the park pawl of the drum it contacts.

It may be built that way for a reason.

Lucky $hit!

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I am awaiting parts, in the meantime i had been driving it just fine, I ordered an extra filter and have reassembled. When the part gets here ill pull the pan, replace the filter again and put the new pieces in. Figure it could always benefit from some more fresh fluid. 

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On 5/12/2021 at 1:49 PM, oleman said:

I have that same transmission. At 206,000 the transmission failed and cost me almost $3000 for the total repair cost. I did no work myself it was a total job for the transmission shop. In all my years of vehicle ownership  I have never paid to have a manual Transmission repaired.  I am talking about a pickup sized vehicles. I am not sure that an automatic doesn't have built in destruction at a specific time.

Milage maybe, but the biggest killer is heat and improper service.

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The transmission rebuild video shows some tricks. I have mentioned it before but years ago in the early 60s to early 70s my Dad worked for a crazy German Russian service station owner. He was 20 years older than my dad but they had a lifelong friendship. The guy owned  his fathers service station they had started in the early 1920s in the same building in a town of 250 people. That service station was busier than one in a big city. The owner  would do anything from auto body repair , welding of anything, tires and any type of mechanical repair. His specialty was automatic transmission. He usually had a couple of people working for him. Always a lot full of cars and stuff for repairs.  They would remove transmissions in daytime he would rebuild them at night. He stocked almost every type of torque converter and kit for the cars of the era. He really was a Master at rebuilding them and I was lucky enough to watch him work on some of them. We actually built him a tumbler to clean and deflash the steel plates that guy was buffing out. It had a big basket with ceramic pebbles that rotated in solvent.  Dad had a wire welder and that guy was going to buy one but wanted to try one. So I got sent over with ours at age 17 to tack and weld this tumbler washer together. After using tumbler  He actually rented it to a big transmission place ( smitty chain in nearest big town) they built their own after copying his. We also helped him welded a spring compressor together. It was foot operated  and compressing fingers came down by pedal force and locked by a pawl,tooth until snap ring could be assembled. It is amazing what those old guys could fix with the training they had and their natural ability just to make things work

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20 minutes ago, dale560 said:

The transmission rebuild video shows some tricks. I have mentioned it before but years ago in the early 60s to early 70s my Dad worked for a crazy German Russian service station owner. He was 20 years older than my dad but they had a lifelong friendship. The guy owned  his fathers service station they had started in the early 1920s in the same building in a town of 250 people. That service station was busier than one in a big city. The owner  would do anything from auto body repair , welding of anything, tires and any type of mechanical repair. His specialty was automatic transmission. He usually had a couple of people working for him. Always a lot full of cars and stuff for repairs.  They would remove transmissions in daytime he would rebuild them at night. He stocked almost every type of torque converter and kit for the cars of the era. He really was a Master at rebuilding them and I was lucky enough to watch him work on some of them. We actually built him a tumbler to clean and deflash the steel plates that guy was buffing out. It had a big basket with ceramic pebbles that rotated in solvent.  Dad had a wire welder and that guy was going to buy one but wanted to try one. So I got sent over with ours at age 17 to tack and weld this tumbler washer together. After using tumbler  He actually rented it to a big transmission place ( smitty chain in nearest big town) they built their own after copying his. We also helped him welded a spring compressor together. It was foot operated  and compressing fingers came down by pedal force and locked by a pawl,tooth until snap ring could be assembled. It is amazing what those old guys could fix with the training they had and their natural ability just to make things work

I don’t know for sure but the propensity of the older generation to fix and repair had to be from the times, I remember my old man ( born ‘18 ) would fix and repair most everything we had, being his kid I banged around with stuff all the time, nowadays everything is throwaway and nobody wants to take the time to fix anything, the funniest thing I remember just because doesn’t happen anymore is fixing your own tv, he/we used to take out the probable offending tubes take them to the local drugstore and test them, cross reference the bad ones with their new stock, go home and put them back and presto we had two channels again.

Another funny one which I’ve mentioned before was a ‘50 skoda he had, ‘56 or so he was putting new kingpins in and he calls me over to hold a rod on top of the sleeve so he could pound downwards to knock the pin out, well the rod slipped on impact and my fingers are slammed between the two, I’m kyyying away bleeding and yelling, the old man was laffing so hard I thought he wuz gonna have a heart attack, my mother is running down the back stairs thinking someone died, that happened 65 years ago and I still remember it like yesterday. I figured the way I grew up was normal for the times and I brought my kids up much the same, except for the kingpins, we had moved on to ball joints by then.

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48 minutes ago, Dasnake said:

I don’t know for sure but the propensity of the older generation to fix and repair had to be from the times, I remember my old man ( born ‘18 ) would fix and repair most everything we had, being his kid I banged around with stuff all the time, nowadays everything is throwaway and nobody wants to take the time to fix anything, the funniest thing I remember just because doesn’t happen anymore is fixing your own tv, he/we used to take out the probable offending tubes take them to the local drugstore and test them, cross reference the bad ones with their new stock, go home and put them back and presto we had two channels again.

Another funny one which I’ve mentioned before was a ‘50 skoda he had, ‘56 or so he was putting new kingpins in and he calls me over to hold a rod on top of the sleeve so he could pound downwards to knock the pin out, well the rod slipped on impact and my fingers are slammed between the two, I’m kyyying away bleeding and yelling, the old man was laffing so hard I thought he wuz gonna have a heart attack, my mother is running down the back stairs thinking someone died, that happened 65 years ago and I still remember it like yesterday. I figured the way I grew up was normal for the times and I brought my kids up much the same, except for the kingpins, we had moved on to ball joints by then.

You learn never to hold a punch or drift for anybody else. I was born in 70 but I have changed my share of king pins or spindle bolts as some parts books call them out. Just on Monday my buddy who is going to seed our soybeans called.he had a front wheel bearing lock on a International 86 2500 s series tri axle truck. It is super nice truck. I ended up cutting seized bearing off spindle and removed king pin so he could find used spindle and hub or have both pieces machined for new bearings. Took me about an hour to get his truck apart. As I was knocking out king pin I had memories of some of the trucks that I had changed them on before. I used to work on some private owned school bus contract route busses for local school district and we used to swap king pins bushings brake parts and grease bearings on some of them as the inspection process required it.

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