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Plexi glass for cab rear window replacement??


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Mowing shop yard with my 2090 Saturday------Bush Hog apparently picked up rock and shattered rear window on 2090.

This is large, hinged flat glass-----should be no big item to replace.

But-----was wondering about how  practical a heavy piece of plexi glass would be for a replacement??

First time to have object thrown toward tractor in many hrs of mowing. Happened once-----will probably happen again.  Bush Hog has safety chains across front.

Who has tried plexi glass for rear window replacement-------how fast did it scratch up on you???

I am 78 yrs old-----need all the visibility I can get for backing up, hitching etc.  Am afraid a window screen would hamper visibility??

Thanks for any thoughts/experience on the subject.

 

 

DD

 

 

 

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Lexan would be a nicer product and have similar properties. Going to scratch easily either way. 

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Plex-i-glass will turn yellow. Lexan is stronger and will stay clear. Lexan is used in greenhouses. Pricey, but anything worth it always is.

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Lexan is the only way to go.  Thats what they use in forestry equipment it will scratch but “practically” unbreakable lol.    Also used as bulletproof glass 

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Anybody ever have a lexan snowplow blade on their pickup? Local guy put one on his diesel F350 back in the ‘90s.  Everybody thought it was going to shatter in two minutes. He -Used- it for years. 

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It works for some time. Eventually it gets scratched up enough its hard to see.

Check with my friends at Dumas tractor salvage. Tell them Martin 'Ace' Mershon sent ya.

Thx-Ace 

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24 minutes ago, acem said:

It works for some time. Eventually it gets scratched up enough its hard to see.

Check with my friends at Dumas tractor salvage. Tell them Martin 'Ace' Mershon sent ya.

Thx-Ace 

Thanks Ace.  I presume you meant to say:  tell them Ace sent you-----and pay cash!!!🤣

I can get one off of a local tractor that the owner parked with transmission problems-----just wanted to improve the situation some if practical.

Uhhhhh-----not looking forward to another explosion with glass showering over my head and down my back.  Drs. are treating me for all sorts of heart ailments-------but after "taking the test" and surviving; I don't think anything could be wrong with my heart!!!!🤐

 

DD

 

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We have a JD 4700 with a Curtis soft cab on it at work. The original roll up vinyl back window lasted about 5 years. I replaced it with a piece of tinted Lexan which lasted about 15 years before getting hazy enough that it was hard to see out of backing into the sun. It's on the 2nd piece of Lexan now. When we had Gators with Mauser cabs, the doors were glass with no protection and mounted in the "suicide" position. The guys would ride with the door open to pick up trash with a pick up stick and invariably wouldn't see a bollard pole or retaining wall. As they broke, I replaced them with tinted Lexan which ultimately outlasted the Gators. At the time, glass doors were in the 400$ range and Lexan half of that. I had kept the last glass door as a pattern for the guy who cut the Lexan and even it ended up getting broken in the storage area. But, the gators were long gone by then.

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It's a very good idea. Yes, lexan will scratch and it will haze, especially if the tractor spends all its life outdoors. But it could literally save your life if something of sufficient size were to get kicked back at ya. Newer Massey tractors have a mower tractor cab option that replaces the rear windows and right side door with lexan.

Hint for minor scratches and hazing, I have had relatively good results with a rotary buffer and automotive rubbing compound for cleaning them up. Key is to keep the area wet and not get too aggressive with the buffer.

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On a transit bus all the exterior windows are tempered glass. 

Why do you think the companies use the tempered glass?

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We always sold and installed lexan front window guards whenever we sold rotary cutters to be installed on excavators.  Either 1 1/2 or 2” lexan in a fabricated angle iron frame.  It paid off when a county operator caught a steel fence post and it was thrown at the guard.  The post was stuck in the lexan with about 6” on the inside staring at the operator.  It made believers out of everyone....

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Neighboring ranch has a brush mastactor on a Kubota skid steer. The mastacator came with 1 1/2 lexion door. The dealer would not deliever mastacator without the door. With time it chews up 10 to 12 inch oaks limbs.

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There is no doubt in my mind that the softer plastics aren't better thanat tempered glass for shatter, impact resistance because it flexes BUT it is not as hard so scratches easier

In some other applications it also works better. A grocery type check stand mounted scanner is a good example.

The engineers tried about every clear material and the most reliable and longest lasting was a  version of Lexan.

The  real outdoor issue is UV resistance because there is NO currently available  plastic that is truly UV resistant.

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