Jump to content

Good for another couple million blows


Recommended Posts

i have much to learn, i dont knwo the difference between a mill/lathe/surface grinder I thot they were all called a file 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 54
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Got a call from my machinist buddy yesterday and we tackled cleanup on the 230lb Hay Budden yesterday afternoon. Started on the bottom and followed that by taking a little off the top, cleaning off th

Looks like I need to widen my sources to look for stuff but that doesn't help my space problem. Any 30x50 shops on big iron for about $10,000? 🙂

i have much to learn, i dont knwo the difference between a mill/lathe/surface grinder I thot they were all called a file 

Posted Images

28 minutes ago, searcyfarms said:

i have much to learn, i dont knwo the difference between a mill/lathe/surface grinder I thot they were all called a file 

Mill goes uppy downy and side to side, looks like a drill press on steroids with more features  

lathe goes roundy roundy and is normally longer. No uppy downy

surface grinder goes side to side across the “surface” to make things smoothy smooth

file trumps all with enough brute strength and ignorance (and time)

Warning, no text books were quoted in the typing of this post...

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

That’s really cool , I have a smaller anvil and use it all the time . The mill would be handy but I’m not sure if I would use it enough , I do have a big machinist drill press that I can mill with if I want ,  just need to buy some tooling .

Danny 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/10/2021 at 7:31 AM, Rawleigh99 said:

And a surface grinder to finish it with!

Get a Brown & Sharpe 618 Micromaster best tool room surface grinder ever made.

I assembled the last few made.    

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Rawleigh99 said:

Even trammed in you can still get a visible mark from the edge of a cutter.  You cannot feel it is but you can see it.

True, but that appears more than just a visual line in the picture...................finger nail catch it?

How well does a anvil cut?  I would think that it would machine pretty hard an eat alot of inserts?  Doesn't take much of a feed with junk inserts in a cutter to knock things out of tram.  Just me being curious, what is the hardness of a anvil?  Anyone know?   I got a fly cutter I run a negative rake turning tool holder in on my mill to clean up surfaces and not leave machine marks, but I would guess a anvil would be to hard for it, but maybe I have a idea in my head that a anvil is super hard and that might not be the case.  

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, jeeper61 said:

Get a Brown & Sharpe 618 Micromaster best tool room surface grinder ever made.

I assembled the last few made.    

You used to work for Brown and Sharp? We had one in tech school but I don't remember the model

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, searcyfarms said:

@MTO did you even finish h/s

? you never had time for studying books you were too busy with extra curriculars 

 

I DID!

Good thing they didn`t have an allotted time period though....

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, jeeper61 said:

Get a Brown & Sharpe 618 Micromaster best tool room surface grinder ever made.

I assembled the last few made.    

Ebay, Howell MI  $1500

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, jeeper61 said:

Get a Brown & Sharpe 618 Micromaster best tool room surface grinder ever made.

I assembled the last few made.    

Ebay Park Brook OH  $2500

Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, bitty said:

You used to work for Brown and Sharp? We had one in tech school but I don't remember the model

Yes I was 18 when I started at the cutter tool plant in 79

We used 618's for making the tools to make form relieved cutters.

These tools were the "bits"  for the back off lathes that cut the shape on the form relieved cutters before hardening.

We made all kind of cutter shapes from gear cutting shapes, gun hammer profiles. Pillar jaw shapes etc.  

The company had discontinued them and my boss wanted a few new ones for our plant so he ordered all the parts out of the stock and we built 8 eight of them to replace all the grinders we were using.

My boss started with Brown & Sharpe before WW2 went to war and came back worked there the rest of his career so he was close to retirement then and had a lot of contacts in the company.

He got the main assembly foreman his buddy to come to our plant and we put eight grinders to together.

He hand scraped them all in and showed me the process,

I will never forget those two old timers there was so much knowledge between those two on pression metal working and pression assembly.

Its sad most of this knowledge has been lost.     

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hand scraping is definitely a lost art..........B&S made great stuff, so did Bridgeport, so did South Bend, so did Monarch, so did Hardinge, so did many others that have vanished or were bought an the name put on imported junk.  Such a shame...........before I go off into the political weeds, I better stop, but I get really upset over it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TP from Central PA said:

True, but that appears more than just a visual line in the picture...................finger nail catch it?

How well does a anvil cut?  I would think that it would machine pretty hard an eat alot of inserts?  Doesn't take much of a feed with junk inserts in a cutter to knock things out of tram.  Just me being curious, what is the hardness of a anvil?  Anyone know?   I got a fly cutter I run a negative rake turning tool holder in on my mill to clean up surfaces and not leave machine marks, but I would guess a anvil would be to hard for it, but maybe I have a idea in my head that a anvil is super hard and that might not be the case.  

 

Fingernail would barely catch it before I cleaned it up with a flap disc. I didn’t run my test files over the face and check but the carbides were throwing sparks most of the time.  This one is manual feed so he or I ran it at what speed we thought it needed based on feel and sound.

All in all, a guy has to remember, this is a tool made by hand originally and is now far closer to square than it ever was when new. The work I will do will be to eyeball tolerances not micrometer. This anvil had a nice straight face but was high on either end when set on the mill table. Some are beat to the point of being sway backed. This was not the case here. I took good (in my mind) and made it better for what I wanted. I probably wouldn’t do that to my Grandpa’s anvil but I intend to use this quite a bit. (I use Grandpas for other small things)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, TP from Central PA said:

Pipe Smoking Old Fart quote #57..............."Your eye-ball is a pretty accurate measuring tool IF you learn to trust it"

Kind of like my buddy years ago made the comment about something that wasn’t true “It’s not a lie if YOU believe it”

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, TP from Central PA said:

Hand scraping is definitely a lost art..........B&S made great stuff

All the grinder ways were ground by then on a large grinder.

This guy was old school and he hand scraped every way on those eight.

A lot of our production equipment was custom made in late 1800's early 1900"s all mechanical cam operated like the screw machines B&S made.

All castings poured at the their foundry all these machines made to support making machine tools for others to make their products.

Everything done in house such a  shame these companies no longer exist     

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I see guys running parts on CNC machines often and think to myself I bet I could run those same parts on a 00 or 2G screw machine faster................there is another thing long gone, guy who laid out cam's for those.  I was in the year of the last screw machine courses at the tech college here, they did away with it the year after.  Its too bad, when they are setup right and working right, they are an art.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Maytag had a whole line of screw machines when I did my apprenticeship in 99 ish. Was out at plant 8 where transmissions and pumps were put together and maching done on the parts. They made pump shafts and various other parts, at one time made all or most of their own fasteners. That was long before my time tho. But when they were set up it was amazing how many parts those old screw machines could clunk out. All mechanical no computer nothing. 

    We had a heck of a time with one, something broke and we had to get a new cam or arm but nobody noticed it wasn't identical to the old until after it had been broke and rewelded twice I think. Finally got it right and away we went. 

  Used to be 1 guy that it was his full time job to set them and other machines up.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

Brown & Sharpe 618 Micromaster best tool room surface grinder ever made

I will explain

The Micromaster grinder line was a change in surface grinder design.

The previous B&S surface grinders were saddle type or stacked stage.

The table moved left and right the cross feed moved the table in an out and the spindle moved up and down

The Micromaster line decoupled the table from the cross feed by moving the spindle on a large heavy  column in and out known as a column type surface grinder

  Column type surface grinders will produce a much finer finish and are less influenced by vibrations from other equipment  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeeper, I never seen one in person only in books.................to salty for anyone around me.  

I can't say I ever liked surface grinding.............I machined a bunch of vee-blocks in college, heat treated them, and surface ground them into a perfect 90.  Took me forever, but had a ton of time:lol:  But I later worked at a shop that did job work for a graphics machine company...............the owner of the place I worked at was a salesman, not a machinist and ended up with the business through a nasty split with a partner who was a machinist............My boss would quote jobs that he knew nothing about, usually the other employee(old fart) would actually do the quote, and the owner would "Present" it................Well, this company got him one time on their site looking at parts, and he threw a number out for some castings that was way under everyone else.  He got the work alright,  but its real hard to hold a parallel, flat, and surface finish on a castings that were undersized for the machining process to start with IMO.  I ended up surface grinding one side of the part, surface grinding a fixture to clamp them on in the CNC machining center, and after I got them roughed in on there, I brought them in with the surface grinder.  What a PITA.......Harig surface grinder with no power feed, cranking away all day.  I will probably have a nightmare tonight..............Owner lost his A$$ on that run of parts.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, jeeper61 said:

You get Popeye arms with out power feed.

 

 

Those Harigs cranked easy................Just the repetition all day.  Its actually funny because I had the exact same model grinder in college that I ground all my angle plates and vee blocks on.  Probably why I never bought a surface grinder for myself..............DoAll made some little ones, just never got the urge to NEED one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For some one that needs to fabricate stuff a Bridgeport type mill is the most useful.

That and an engine lathe is all you really need 

I have an old J-head  Bridgeport and a Southbend lathe always wanted a surface grinder but I have access to one at work if I need it and it is not very often.

Most things I have ever had to make for my self has been soft metal so there is no need to grind.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...