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Vertical tillage


bkorth
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I'm kicking around the idea of some sort of vertical the tool for next year, so what brand is the best bang for your buck, let's hear the good, the bad and the ugly. I'd be pulling it with a 7140, what width would it handle?

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We have a CIH 330 TT. Best use we have found for it is taking up valuable shed space. I think we worked 34 acres of corn stalks last fall with it. Should move it to a fence row. Rented a Salford, it wouldn't even remove the tractor tire tracks, let alone weeds. There's a few Landolls around but after a couple years they seem to stay parked in the barn lot as well.

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Vertical tillage probably works good in certain soil conditions but it didn't work up here. A couple farms tried them when it was a fad and they didn't stay around long. When you try to pull anything in the dirt at eight or ten mph in our rocky soil your going to have problems, and that's exactly what happened. Rumor has it the one farm put nearly 10k into theirs trying to keep it in the field the last year they had it. Another factor was that the weed control program had to be stepped up because with less soil disturbance the weeds took off faster so there was another added expense.

The big thing around here now is the degleman pro-till or similar type of tillage tool.

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I use a 24 ft Great Plains turbomax. Pulled it for a few years with a 7120, but that tractor had its hands full. I could never be as aggressive with it when I wanted to be. Now we have a 290, handles it easily.  Turbomaxes usually require ten horsepower per foot of width 

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The key I found out to vertical tillage is timing. In corn fodder, the fodder needs to be dry. Beans stubble never an issue. And with both the ground needs to dry enough. In my clay soils, if it is to wet, it doesn't seem to do as nice of a job. I usually hit the corn stalks as aggressive as I can in the fall, then lightly hit in the spring to loosen up the winter mat

 

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41 minutes ago, boog said:

We have a CIH 330 TT. Best use we have found for it is taking up valuable shed space. I think we worked 34 acres of corn stalks last fall with it. Should move it to a fence row. Rented a Salford, it wouldn't even remove the tractor tire tracks, let alone weeds. There's a few Landolls around but after a couple years they seem to stay parked in the barn lot as well.

We traded the 335tt weed transplanter for a 345 disk that kills them

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We are on our second Great Plains 24' Turbo Max. They are NOT a disc and will not fill in ruts. We use it to open up and air out ground that is a little too wet to no-till and they do a fantastic job of that. we run it about 2"s deep at 2 to 3 degrees the faster you go the better job it does so usually the younger guys get that job. Ten horse per foot will work just fine at these settings, if you sink it in the ground at 6 degrees power and traction become a problem.

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1 hour ago, boog said:

We have a CIH 330 TT. Best use we have found for it is taking up valuable shed space. I think we worked 34 acres of corn stalks last fall with it. Should move it to a fence row. Rented a Salford, it wouldn't even remove the tractor tire tracks, let alone weeds. There's a few Landolls around but after a couple years they seem to stay parked in the barn lot as well.

Odd question 

I notice you crop guys do that.  Fence row.  Why not sell things you dont need.?  We have a machine that sits a season an it is traded or sold before next 

What is purpose pf vertical tillage?   I dont really get it but we are not crop farmers 

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33 minutes ago, farmer john 8910 said:

We traded the 335tt weed transplanter for a 345 disk that kills them

I had a 330. Top picture. Got replaced with a 345 too 3 years ago. Bottom picture. Don't use a disk regularly, but when I need too, this sucker does a good job and goes in the ground. Just got tired of wore out disks, and this one will last my farming career.

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I haul cattle manure on probably 1/2 of my acres every winter, bean stubble and corn stalks, irrigated and dryland and I hate turning bean stubble black with a disk in our hills to break up and incorporate the manure. This is where I got the idea of a vertical tillage tool, it would leave more residue on top to satisfy the dirt police. I also plant a fair amount of corn on corn and wondered if a pass with a 340 disk in the fall followed by a VT tool in the spring would suffice but I'm thinking that this would require one with some angle on the gangs. Weeds aren't a real big concern if I put some 24D with the pre herbicide. There seems to be more of these machines showing up around here.

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1 hour ago, boog said:

We have a CIH 330 TT. Best use we have found for it is taking up valuable shed space. I think we worked 34 acres of corn stalks last fall with it. Should move it to a fence row. Rented a Salford, it wouldn't even remove the tractor tire tracks, let alone weeds. There's a few Landolls around but after a couple years they seem to stay parked in the barn lot as well.

VT is over-rated IMO................

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Vertical tillage was big around here for a while, now degelman Protills and Jokers are the big things. I have never used either and dont feel the need to try either, not my thing. There are a lot of both of those around here.

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On 5/9/2021 at 6:23 PM, JaredT said:

Vertical tillage was big around here for a while, now degelman Protills and Jokers are the big things. I have never used either and dont feel the need to try either, not my thing. There are a lot of both of those around here.

Both those are big around here. Used to be jokers when it was becoming a thing and now it seems the degelman pro till has taken over. Around here they seem to work pretty good. Seems like anybody that was no tilling is now running one in fall, and some run them in spring too. They sure leave a nice finish and a good seed bed. 

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Reading this thread is interesting. The reason people don't like them are the reasons I have always been skeptical to try one. Im not sure what the point of vertical tillage is other than to process residue. Beyond that they are worthless. A friend has one. I've asked him a few times how he likes it. Hes always vague as to what the benefits are. 

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1 hour ago, tractorholic said:

Reading this thread is interesting. The reason people don't like them are the reasons I have always been skeptical to try one. Im not sure what the point of vertical tillage is other than to process residue. Beyond that they are worthless. A friend has one. I've asked him a few times how he likes it. Hes always vague as to what the benefits are. 

This is our third wet spring in a row without the vertical tillage we would still be waiting for it to dry out enough to no till.

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A friend of mine runs a Great Plains Turbo Chopper. He likes it for knocking weeds down and making some loose soil to dry it out to plant sooner. 

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We don't have a vertical tillage tool and I have not used one before, so take my opinion for what it's worth, not much.  ? But I don't think you can compare a vertical tillage tool to a disk and complain that it doesn't do the same things.  Disks cut and throw a lot of dirt.  But disks also cause compaction, especially in certain conditions.

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25 minutes ago, acem said:

I've never seen anything like that down here. It looks like a disk with flat blades.

What's it for?

Thx-Ace 

I believe that the idea is to process, or “size”, the residue without burying it so that a No-Till drill/planter can be run.

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So cant you just shredder it all down?  The stalks.  I thought a no till machine went though anything....?  Now i am confused.

How does it help dry out the field @from H to 80?  Opening up the residue?

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2 hours ago, TroyDairy said:

So cant you just shredder it all down?  The stalks.  I thought a no till machine went though anything....?  Now i am confused.

How does it help dry out the field @from H to 80?  Opening up the residue?

They cut residue and fluff the soil up 2-3” deep depending where you set it. We pull ours at 9.8 mph with the big Steiger. Picked up Landoll version that is more like a disk and only run about 7.5 with it as it will ridge in center but cuts deeper and will level better  

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