Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I have always wondered what happened to the blueprints from IH machinery. Are they all lost, partly lost, did somebody buy all of them or are they owned by Case IH?

Would be handy if I could speak to the person who owned these now that I need parts..¬†ūü§£ūüėā

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

I think he's looking for measured drawings of the parts themselves.

Well it was more of a joke, but I am really interested in what happened to them. And indeed, its about the measured drawings. A lot of things are still available, but injection pump parts for the letter series tractor for example are nla, just nowhere available. That got me wondering even more, someone has to have them. I cant believe they are gone

Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand what you meant now.  Yes, those blueprints would be neat to have now. It would take a lot of them for just 1 machine!

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/9/2021 at 5:05 AM, Farmall 1466 said:

I have always wondered what happened to the blueprints from IH machinery. Are they all lost, partly lost, did somebody buy all of them or are they owned by Case IH?

Would be handy if I could speak to the person who owned these now that I need parts..¬†ūü§£ūüėā

I'd contact CaseIH & see if they still have them. Not sure if any of that made it to the archives over in Madison. Hopefully they didn't go into a dumpster or were pushed into a big hole when the respective factories were bulldozed.

Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

I'd contact CaseIH & see if they still have them. Not sure if any of that made it to the archives over in Madison. Hopefully they didn't go into a dumpster or were pushed into a big hole when the respective factories were bulldozed.

Mike

You could try that.. I would think that there is a market for a lot of these nla products, if priced reasonably

Link to post
Share on other sites

30 years ago when I worked in a dealership I did request and get a blueprint for a couple parts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Would be nice for a machinist , but redundant for the normal person fun to look at maybe

Link to post
Share on other sites

Publishing them online... open source.... whatever you would want to call it, would be great.

while very expensive to make NLA parts it can be done for a cost.  Not having to reverse engineer parts to get Dimensions and tolerances would help.

with 3D printing making leaps forward, that could be a future solution to some  difficult to acquire parts.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mudfly said:

Publishing them online... open source.... whatever you would want to call it, would be great.

while very expensive to make NLA parts it can be done for a cost.  Not having to reverse engineer parts to get Dimensions and tolerances would help.

with 3D printing making leaps forward, that could be a future solution to some  difficult to acquire parts.

Hmmmmmm.... you know, a smaller 3D printed TA assembly would make a great desktop conversation piece.

 

Mike

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

A little off topic, but I worked in a tool and Die shop. We had big tables for laying out the prints for the molds. The table I used to use, had a 4' x 8' sheet of aluminum, and inscribed on it was a dashboard for a 60's something Dodge truck. Rather than a paper blueprint, it was on a sheet of aluminum. No idea what happened to it, I was out of state when that building was flattened and a new one built. Probably be pretty unique to have these days.

Link to post
Share on other sites

CIH still has them all safely stored at Hinsdale.  They do not share them with dealers or the public for legal reasons for the last 20+ years.  There are a few exceptions to this, but very few.

In the future....some parts will be 3D printed.  The dealer buys a 1 time use parts file that is loaded into their 3D part casting machine and a short while later, your part is ready to go!  For some parts this will eliminate backorders....forever!  

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, Bermuda_Ken said:

CIH still has them all safely stored at Hinsdale.  They do not share them with dealers or the public for legal reasons for the last 20+ years.  There are a few exceptions to this, but very few.

In the future....some parts will be 3D printed.  The dealer buys a 1 time use parts file that is loaded into their 3D part casting machine and a short while later, your part is ready to go!  For some parts this will eliminate backorders....forever!  

Is this something that is actually in the planning stage?  I can't quite imagine this at the dealer level, maybe regional?  3D printing is good for some parts, but others will need some machining/grinding/heat treating after the printing process.  That would require a significant investment of equipment at each dealer, however, maybe 4 to 6 locations across the country would make sense.

Forgot to add, I think its a great idea, just curious about the implementation.

 

 

Edited by Mudfly
addition
Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see some obscure parts that do not require finishing or heat treatment going this way.  

I have a prosthetic right foot.  Lots of 3d printed parts making their way into that industry. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see the instore 3D printing of SOME parts in 10 years or less at the dealership level.  The technology is there to do this, the demand just has to be created.

There are already plans to eliminate paper sales literature with a video kiosk at the dealership.  I can understand that, as it can be updated every night to show the latest information along with videos, ect.   AGCO is already working on this and it should be out in 2022??  

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The demand is going to be the hard part. Every year there are fewer of these old tractors in use, not more. Demand is waning, not growing.

Turning a measured drawing into a 3D part file is not a matter of scanning the blueprint into the computer and having it magically turn into a printed part. Someone has to model the part in 3D using the measured drawings and there is a whole R&D process where the part would be repeatedly printed, fitted, tweaked, reprinted, and so on until the part that comes off the printer fits and functions properly more times than not. That effort doesn't come free, so it will likely be limited to high-demand parts where there is a reasonable return on investment.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

The demand is going to be the hard part. Every year there are fewer of these old tractors in use, not more. Demand is waning, not growing.

Turning a measured drawing into a 3D part file is not a matter of scanning the blueprint into the computer and having it magically turn into a printed part. Someone has to model the part in 3D using the measured drawings and there is a whole R&D process where the part would be repeatedly printed, fitted, tweaked, reprinted, and so on until the part that comes off the printer fits and functions properly more times than not. That effort doesn't come free, so it will likely be limited to high-demand parts where there is a reasonable return on investment.

Concur.  But this will still be easier/faster/cheaper with access to the drawings, instead of starting from scratch.  The only other option is to use a 3D scanner of a near perfect part to to create the model and even then their would be small amounts of error that would need to be confirmed and corrected.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I mean, if the price is reasonable for  now obsolete parts, it might just create attention and demand for these older tractors, because people know parts are available at fair prices

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Bermuda_Ken said:

My sources at Hinsdale say most everything engineered after 2000 is 3D printable format ready.....that was 21 years ago..

 

So, how far back into antiquity do these blueprints go.... and when you mention Hinsdale, are you referring to FEREC? Otherwise, there really isn't an agricultural anything left down there after all the shingled weeds took over the fields. Think there is or was a small park dedicated to IH or McCormick or something like that. That would be about it.

Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Farmall 1466 said:

I mean, if the price is reasonable for  now obsolete parts, it might just create attention and demand for these older tractors, because people know parts are available at fair prices

And why would they want to do that?   They want to sell you a NEW tractor, preferably one that has a computer control system that will be so obsolete in 10 years that the tractor will no longer function, so they can sell you either very expensive SW updates, or a new tractor.

I think digitizing those prints and having them available would be a fantastic project.   Honestly can't imagine why there is a "liability" with showing these to the public....I mean, how can you sue over a part design from 50 years ago??  "It doesn't meet 2021 code" ... Um YES?   

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

And why would they want to do that?   They want to sell you a NEW tractor, preferably one that has a computer control system that will be so obsolete in 10 years that the tractor will no longer function, so they can sell you either very expensive SW updates, or a new tractor.

I think digitizing those prints and having them available would be a fantastic project.   Honestly can't imagine why there is a "liability" with showing these to the public....I mean, how can you sue over a part design from 50 years ago??  "It doesn't meet 2021 code" ... Um YES?   

I understand what you are saying and you are probably right, but would a lot of modern farmers trade their tractor for lets say a 1466? New tractors work so much better and comfortable. Reliability issues more often than not are linked to electronics and you cant fix it for yourself often, thats the only drawback together with high costs.

I honestly hope that CNH will one day make all these blueprints available to all of us. Probably not tho

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...