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Home made parts washers


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I use the household dishwasher as often as I can.  I used it on the cast iron oil pan from the D179, that baby came out with surface rust where the crud had been.  If it fits in the box, not too heavy and can take the heat it goes in. Just dish washer soap and very high temperature. I have not tried a LYE solution but if the pump will take the chemical mixture it should be fine.

Only down side is the dirty part has to come inside the house.

My disabled Son and I are the only occupants at this address.

 

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8 hours ago, oleman said:

I use the household dishwasher as often as I can.  I used it on the cast iron oil pan from the D179, that baby came out with surface rust where the crud had been.  If it fits in the box, not too heavy and can take the heat it goes in. Just dish washer soap and very high temperature. I have not tried a LYE solution but if the pump will take the chemical mixture it should be fine.

Only down side is the dirty part has to come inside the house.

My disabled Son and I are the only occupants at this address.

 

A parts washer would be significantly cheaper than the divorce here...

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Back in the day when cash was tight I cut a barrel in half, the long way, and hinged the upper part. I made an angle iron tray for the bottom, and angle iron legs. I had a five gallon bucket underneath connected with a pipe. My pump was an old Ford oil pump with the drive shaft connected with a rubber hose to I think an old sewing machine motor.The pump was submerged in the bucket and I think I had an old oil filter in the line. It actually worked pretty good. Still have it stashed in a trailer from when I had to clean out and redo my shop.

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Buddy worked in a hydraulics shop and they used a cement mixer 

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If you can get your hands on 2 120lb oil cans, the kind that 90W comes in, cut one of them  about 6 inches down from the top . Take this piece and test fit it into the top of the other one. It should slide in easily til it hits the lip. If it doesn’t, cut and re-weld one side of the ring until it fits without getting stuck. Now weld this to the bottom of a stainless steel sink, but make the ring hang off the back of the sink just enough to make room to run the electrical and solvent lines that will be coming up out of the tank. Mount your solvent pipe in one of the holes where the sink fixture would go, and if you’re creative you can make a little wooden bracket to hold a switch and light.  I used a little giant pump, expensive but the best out there. You can simply hang the pump from the solvent line but you have to be careful how you lay down the unit when you are changing the solvent. Incorporating a piece of 1/2 inch conduit would be best though. This is basically a knock-off of a Safety Kleen machine of the ‘80s. And I don’t know why suddenly everything I write is underlined.

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On 5/7/2021 at 7:19 AM, Jesse Browning said:

55 gallon drum. One gallon drain cleaner. Immersion heater. Boiled for one hour.

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Wow that is a superb idea! What is that backing plate off of? Those skinny brake shoes and all those bolt holes looks like the one on my M5H6

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I’m thinking this is his recent halftrack project he is restoring 

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