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Is it a decal or is it painted?


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Underwater at 17,000+ feet, the carrier Hornet, sunk 1942, the IH tow is almost pristine after 79 years.

C63C9747-7714-429C-A471-D6C5B245E85C.jpeg

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Should be a decal i would think.

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glad the seat is up so it doesn't get wet... 

I wonder this about older machines, they aren't the decals we think of today in any case, on the Allis it really does look like paint.. almost as though it was screen printed on, that is original and always stored inside so they are in pretty good shape. the decals we have today peel, or fade but they don't show paint through... perhaps what was a decal is different from what it is today? maybe they fall somewhere between? more like those fake tattoos kids get in Cracker Jack boxes?

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5 hours ago, Dasnake said:

Underwater at 17,000+ feet, the carrier Hornet, sunk 1942, the IH tow is almost pristine after 79 years.

C63C9747-7714-429C-A471-D6C5B245E85C.jpeg

Wow never seen one of those before..... are they rare? I wonder how much it would cost to have it recovered....

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1 minute ago, IH 340 said:

Wow never seen one of those before..... are they rare? I wonder how much it would cost to have it recovered....

Probably several dollars per foot of depth 😊 

I guess no O2 and cold keeps things from decaying at all. Probably need to change the oil at least 😉

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40 minutes ago, highcotton said:

Great Uncle flew off the Hornet on Doolittle’s Raid. 

Wow, I read the story, 16 planes, the ballsiest move was fly off a carrier with a B25, the navy guys couldn’t believe it when the first lumbering planes first took off, jimmy had 469 feet to fly off the boat with, all were volunteers, great family story there my friend.

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He was on the plane that landed in Vladistok and was subsequently held there- his name was Nolan Herndon. Damn fine man that I was privileged to know and have conversations with. 

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1 hour ago, highcotton said:

He was on the plane that landed in Vladistok and was subsequently held there- his name was Nolan Herndon. Damn fine man that I was privileged to know and have conversations with. 

My cousin was married to Sgt. Ted Laban, bombardier on that same plane, #8.  There was some controversy over them landing in Russia instead of crashing at sea like the others. But in the early 80's it was finally released that President Roosevelt had ordered them to land there to see just how committed the Russians were about being allies with the US and England.

 l never got to meet him before he died in 1978 but l did visit with my cousin later and she showed me a personal journal that he had written about the whole Doolittle raid, from being selected as one of the crews, training for takeoffs on a carrier, the actual raid and how they escaped from the Russians after being held captive for over a year.

Here is a pic that is supposed to be the Hornet returning to Pearl Harbor after the Raiders had taken off her deck but l'm not 100% about that. l saved the pic about 10 years ago because of the tractors. Not sure what kind they are.....??

 

hornet-tractor.jpg

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11 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Probably several dollars per foot of depth 😊 

I guess no O2 and cold keeps things from decaying at all. Probably need to change the oil at least 😉

I've said this before and none of you listen.

There's no way an oil change is all it needs.

For sure the points and condenser will need replacing too!

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12 hours ago, IH 340 said:

Wow never seen one of those before..... are they rare? I wonder how much it would cost to have it recovered....

  The Hornet would be considered a war grave just like the Arizona.  The US Navy would not allow any removal such as that.  Any items removed would be limited to small fairly impersonal items such as a pen, spoon, wrench, or similar things for the intent of being placed in a museum ..... with the Navy's permission which would be quite difficult to get.  

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4 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  The Hornet would be considered a war grave just like the Arizona.  The US Navy would not allow any removal such as that.  Any items removed would be limited to small fairly impersonal items such as a pen, spoon, wrench, or similar things for the intent of being placed in a museum ..... with the Navy's permission which would be quite difficult to get.  

On top of that it wasn’t discovered until ‘19, and even at that specialty submersibles had to be used, another 5 or 6 thousand feet deeper than the titanic is. 

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👍------to the Doolittle Raiders.

That's unique to hear from some of the relatives.

I too remembering reading the book (30 seconds over Tokyo??) when in grade school.  Was always one of my favorites.

Thanks to that generation.  They had hair on their as$-------todays generation has too much hair on their head.  Little or none on their as$.

 

Trying to remember further-----when was the Hornet sunk??

 

DD

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6 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

👍------to the Doolittle Raiders.

That's unique to hear from some of the relatives.

I too remembering reading the book (30 seconds over Tokyo??) when in grade school.  Was always one of my favorites.

Thanks to that generation.  They had hair on their as$-------todays generation has too much hair on their head.  Little or none on their as$.

 

Trying to remember further-----when was the Hornet sunk??

 

DD

1942, battle of the Santa Cruz islands towards the Solomon Islands, here is a pic of the Hornet with the Doolittle planes on board.

And the Hornets last breaths.

4C3B47CD-FA53-472C-B959-CCAB2DA02130.jpeg

CCDE48B4-2DA5-4002-A036-4B5A317C273C.jpeg

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Picture looks like a tractor in @acem 's field rolling rice almost .... 

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Tires are too close together for rice.

The mud packs between them and causes problems. In rice you need wide spaced duals or big singles.

Cool pics. Thanks for posting.

Thx-Ace 

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10 hours ago, jass1660 said:

The pool on the Titanic to this day is still full of water!

I wonder how the ph levels are??????

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10 hours ago, bitty said:

Picture looks like a tractor in @acem 's field rolling rice almost .... 

Look at the sunken pictures doesn’t the tows there look like the ones on land?

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