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model corn crib


Dmnstr8r
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While working on cleaning out old pictures from my phone, I came across a bunch from a project I built years back,  I had more free time on my hands then, and put this together over the course of three years.  I've always marveled at the architecture and character of older buildings, and decided to replicate a crib that was built in 1943 if memory serves.  It sat on a family friend's farmstead.  His father built cribs as a side business, and this was the one he built for himself.  Shortly after I started my project, the original was demolished.  The entire farmstead is gone today.

Everything is scaled appropriately, with the only major deviation being my toy elevator being used in place of the internal bucket line employed in the real McCoy.  I put 500 hours into the model, which still resides here as a reminder of simpler times.  The first few photos below are of the real crib, then my rendition of it.  Plenty more on the phone if anyone is curious about a missing detail or different angle.  Thanks for looking.  

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Thats excellent!  Great detail.  I spent a lot of time in my grandfathers crib as a kid.  Shoveling ear corn for the sheller and cleaning out the bins mostly.  I always liked climbing up top and looking around at how it was built and thinking about its history.  Good memories!

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That is really nice! I would love to have the real one in good shape. We never had a nice large driveway crib with an inside elevator on any of our farms. Rented a couple from neighbors over the years. They were really cool buildings! A lot of work at shelling time, but I never minded. It was a good reason to get all the tractors and wagons out of the shed.

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That is a Grade A beauty. Wonderful job!! Looks like you used a ship building jig for the rafters. Are they steam bent?

 

Mike

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Exceptionally well done!!!  You should be very proud of that work!!!!

 

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You guys have probably heard of Bob & Phylis Johnson, authors of "The CORN PICKER Book",  but their new book, "The CORN CRIB Book" is also available.  I've got about 1/4th of it read.  They went WAY back into the colonial days when only small limited corn crops raised and the cribs sized accordingly.

    That full size crib is a masterpiece of construction. Concrete tunnel for sheller drags, the inside elevator looks a lot like the Kewanee inside elevator in the crib on the farm I grew up on. They are O-K when they work.  But if a chain breaks or jumps off the sprocket it takes about a day to get back to picking or combining.  Must have been 1962 or '63 we had that happen on our crib. Grandpa was involved in the repair, Dad was really irritated at not being able to pick, and I chased lots and lots of parts which required me climbing up/down the ladders all the way up into the cupola many times.  Dad considered an outside conventional elevator but would have needed an elevator 50 or more feet long. And the elevator would have to sit on the only concrete hog feed floor on the whole farm.  That crib is still standing, at least the last time I was past the farm 2 years ago.

     The detail in the scale model crib is fantastic,  needs to be on display in a museum.  Nothing overlooked!  Cribs are fast going the way of corn pickers. They don't fit today's farming style. It's sad, but that's progress.

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Nice job on the model. 

  Too bad the original was torn down. Looks like it was still pretty solid for the most part. 

   Still have the old one on my place but it was in poor shape when I moved on the place and is really getting bad now. Was an old single that was added on to to make a double with a drive. Its in a bad spot and sill Plate was gone in places when I moved there. Mostly gone now and decaying from the rafters down now. Will hate to see it go but I really should take it down and salvage or sell what I can. 

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Amazing work!  I'm envious, wish I had the ability and patience to do that.  The original crib you copied look impressive also.

My Dad rented a crib several years that had the covered overhead bins and they were angled at the bottom.  I was always jealous of those as the crib at my Dad's place just had flat bottoms on the overhead bins above the alley way, so a lot more scooping to empty them.  Dad's crib was pretty nice concrete tunnels under the cribs and an inside conveyor and drag in the floor to dump wagons in.  But 1 big flaw was that they guy who built the crib before my Grandpa bought the farm did not want a cupola as he thought it would look weird if the crib was taller than the barn.  Because of that the inside conveyor wasn't tall enough to use a spout to get the corn to the cribs.  So they had the unload elevator from a 2MH picker at the top of the crib to convey the corn from the inside elevator to the cribs or the overhead bins.  It worked ok....but was a huge pain to move when you switched from 1 side to the other.

Dad just took the crib down.  I was sad to see it go but it was in bad shape and it's hard to justify fixing something that doesn't really have a use in today's farming operation.  I helped take some of it apart.  There were 3 x 12 dimensional hardwood beams supporting the bins over the alleyway...they were heavy!

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Wow is all I can say to the detail. 

All the way down to the weathering on the exterior wood and cable and lightning rods.

You have taken me back fifty years to a place I remember so fondly. 

Thank you!

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Thanks all for the kind words.  No special talents required outside of patience and repetition.  I made the arches by drafting them in an old AutoCAD program and had them laser cut by an online company.  I agree with many of your sentiments and would have loved to have had the real structure at home.  My lifetime only consists of three days working in real cribs my grandfathers had, both of which are long gone.  It was a sad day to see this one go.  It really didn't need much outside of a roof; everything else was square and solid yet.  I appreciate all of your stories; thanks for sharing!

A few more photos to share.  Thanks again all!

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Ok that’s just plan AWESOME!!! I love old farm buildings!! You don’t happen to have any dimensions or blueprints for a real corn crib like that!!

I would love to have that building here on my farm cob corn still makes the best cattle feed!! Just tested my high moisture shelled corn in my harvestore and have some mold and yeast in it enough so I have to add some binder so my cows don’t get sick!!

cob corn doesn’t do that!!!

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Great work we don't have them in the UK as we only grow maize for silage for feed or anaerobic digestion and this is quite recent,were corn cribs simply for storage of grain? They seem to be a specific design or is that just traditional type of architecture interested to know more 

 

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Very neat project

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16 hours ago, wombwell said:

Great work we don't have them in the UK as we only grow maize for silage for feed or anaerobic digestion and this is quite recent,were corn cribs simply for storage of grain? They seem to be a specific design or is that just traditional type of architecture interested to know more 

 

Not something that was done in my part of the USA, so partly a guess. But since no one else has tried to explain. For storage of corn still on the cob. I believe it did not pack that tight so it could be put in wet and air dry naturally. I believe the gaps in siding are to let air flow through the building to help drying.

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15 minutes ago, ray54 said:

Not something that was done in my part of the USA, so partly a guess. But since no one else has tried to explain. For storage of corn still on the cob. I believe it did not pack that tight so it could be put in wet and air dry naturally. I believe the gaps in siding are to let air flow through the building to help drying.

It wasn't put in necessarily wet, but had higher moisture, air could circulate through the corn on the cobs and it woul carry away the moisture with it.  Where I am cribs were normally about 4ft wide, would vary in height and lengths..............Some were built 12 ft apart and roof trusses put over them so you could park things in the center and a crib was on each side.  Others chose to just build one, put a roof over just the width of the crib.  Later round wire mesh cribs came along and were many feet in diameter, had a grain bin style roof, and a box "Chimney" up the middle from a open trough poured in the concrete in the bottom, and other than the middle chimney rest was covered with wood, air could flow in from around the outside and up through the chimney in the middle.  I personally think the old wood cribs worked better here.  The ones like above weren't built were I am, they would have been too expensive, most were really low budget here.  

I am planning on putting corn out again in 2022 to pick for ears and bale the fodder...............Its getting harder to get here, and the few left that do grow it aren't the most ambitious and it is difficult to get when needed, or they put it in wagons and left it and it isn't of great quality, so I am going to pick again.  Have to put a crib up, but as much as I hate to say it, will probably be a round one with the price of lumber.  One thing is for sure, the stuff does make great feed.

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17 hours ago, wombwell said:

Great work we don't have them in the UK as we only grow maize for silage for feed or anaerobic digestion and this is quite recent,were corn cribs simply for storage of grain? They seem to be a specific design or is that just traditional type of architecture interested to know more 

 

When my grandparents began their farming careers, all crops were grown for feed for cattle and hogs; very little went to market.  Corn was picked and oats were put in the overhead bins, both for feed purposes.  They had no grain bins until self propelled combines came along years later.  Later in their careers as technology advanced, livestock left, and cash cropping became the new normal, making many of these cribs obsolete.  Soybeans were stored in some of the overhead bins, but unloading was much more cumbersome than grain bins.  Cribs themselves come in all shapes and sizes.  The one here was a Cadillac crib at the time, and the arched style roof was not something seen very often.  

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