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Had a real barn burner in town last night, i got some quality 1 on 1 time with our 76’ loadstar 1700 did 8 or 9 10 mile round trip shuttle runs, was getting a little nervous about fuel towards the end. Shes got 1500 gallons onboard, 10K on the clock, and came from the local IH dealer less than 1 mile from the firehouse brand new. 
these cabs were never built for someone my size. 

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1 hour ago, vtfireman85 said:

these cabs were never built for someone my size.

Hose clamp short 2x4s to the pedals....

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46 minutes ago, MTO said:

Hose clamp short 2x4s to the pedals....

The opposite is my problem.. you been wrenching buggies too long. 

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25 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

you been wrenching buggies too long. 

alway have to finish with hurt........sigh.

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Well, Seth and Mark, hope you can do some fence mendin' or maybe I just don't get eastern sense of humor. In which case I'll just shut up and mind my own. 

 

Seth, some questions if you don't mind. 

Looks like you were running tender and guessing then a filling port a pond for pumpers or grass rigs to fill/pump out of?

"In town" was there no city water to hook up to?

Assuming structure fire. Sadly here, if there is a structure fire, we rarely get there in time to save the building. Can only keep it from spreading to surrounding structures. 

How did yours come out? 

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29 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

Well, Seth and Mark, hope you can do some fence mendin' or maybe I just don't get eastern sense of humor. In which case I'll just shut up and mind my own. 

 

Seth, some questions if you don't mind. 

Looks like you were running tender and guessing then a filling port a pond for pumpers or grass rigs to fill/pump out of?

"In town" was there no city water to hook up to?

Assuming structure fire. Sadly here, if there is a structure fire, we rarely get there in time to save the building. Can only keep it from spreading to surrounding structures. 

How did yours come out? 

I think we are just ball busting.. or at least i am.

we were shuttling water a 10 mile round trip from one of our water supplies to feed their pumpers, i wont get into the details but unfortunately the first ETA to arrive got stuck at the end of the 1/4 mile uphill driveway so no apparatus could access the scene and it was a very narrow dirt road, no hydrants up there.. in fact wet hydrants are few and far between in VT. In this case our big tanker 3000 gallons was used as a dump tank/reservoir and our small tanker you see in the picture along with about 4 other departments ETAs shuttled to it. Works pretty well of you can spare the tanker. In this case due to the bottleneck they fought the entire fire with 2 hand lines that had to be hauled up hill and through the brush. 
things could have gone smoother, but no one was injured to my knowledge so I guess that is a win. 
building was a total loss. 

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3 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

I think we are just ball busting.. or at least i am.

we were shuttling water a 10 mile round trip from one of our water supplies to feed their pumpers, i wont get into the details but unfortunately the first ETA to arrive got stuck at the end of the 1/4 mile uphill driveway so no apparatus could access the scene and it was a very narrow dirt road, no hydrants up there.. in fact wet hydrants are few and far between in VT. In this case our big tanker 3000 gallons was used as a dump tank/reservoir and our small tanker you see in the picture along with about 4 other departments ETAs shuttled to it. Works pretty well of you can spare the tanker. In this case due to the bottleneck they fought the entire fire with 2 hand lines that had to be hauled up hill and through the brush. 
things could have gone smoother, but no one was injured to my knowledge so I guess that is a win. 
building was a total loss. 

Always interesting to hear how things are done in different areas.

No such thing as a textbook fire, always adapting on the fly.

Sorry bout the building but safety first and the most important thing is everyone makes it back safe.

Thank you for putting in your time. It is not a job everyone is willing to do.

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57 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

Well, Seth and Mark, hope you can do some fence mendin' or maybe I just don't get eastern sense of humor. In which case I'll just shut up and mind my own. 

 

Seth, some questions if you don't mind. 

Looks like you were running tender and guessing then a filling port a pond for pumpers or grass rigs to fill/pump out of?

"In town" was there no city water to hook up to?

Assuming structure fire. Sadly here, if there is a structure fire, we rarely get there in time to save the building. Can only keep it from spreading to surrounding structures. 

How did yours come out? 

Jeff,

It has been my observation that Mark and his nephew Seth enjoy scrapping with each other about like a pig enjoys wrestling in the mud.  At the end of the day you are tired (speaking as a spectator myself) and the pig has enjoyed the wrestle.  No offense to swine intended.

 

Buildings, like vehicles and equipment, can be fixed or replaced.  People not so much. I was happy to hear that there were no injuries.  Or worse.

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7 minutes ago, 1586 Jeff said:

t has been my observation that Mark and his nephew Seth enjoy scrapping with each other

I hate him......sniff.

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Love IH trucks, hate the short cabs.......no leg room for a tall guy and no belly room for a fat guy!....... I have both issues!

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21 minutes ago, MTO said:

I hate him......sniff.

Lesson learned...................................MYODB...............🤠

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1 hour ago, vtfireman85 said:

in fact wet hydrants are few and far between in VT.

I would have to imagine wet hydrants are nearly non existent in VT and anywhere else it gets below freezing. ;)

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1 hour ago, sandhiller said:

 

No such thing as a textbook fire, always adapting on the fly.

 

That made me laff, all my years we always said, “ it’s not how you duck up, cuz that’s always gonna happen it's how you recover”.

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8 hours ago, sandhiller said:

Lesson learned...................................MYODB...............🤠

It's all good Jeffrey.

You can stick your nose into my biz or campfire anytime.

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6 minutes ago, MTO said:

It's all good Jeffrey.

You can stick your nose into my campfire anytime.

Don’t tell dat to Pinocchio.

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On 4/19/2021 at 2:26 PM, ZG6E said:

I would have to imagine wet hydrants are nearly non existent in VT and anywhere else it gets below freezing. ;)

Dry barrel hydrants. Not to be confused with a dry hydrant.

Dry barrel hydrants are pressurized and work like any other regular hydrant. The difference is that the valve is below the frost line and they drain out through holes below the frost line when closed, as opposed to remaining filled with water to freeze.

A dry hydrant is a non pressurized hydrant that requires suction to draft water through it.

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That could be our old 76 grain truck, except we have the factory radio!  Has 34,000 miles on it now. I am 6'2". Cab is not roomy for sure!

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Spot on KWRB. We have both. Dry and dry

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9 hours ago, KWRB said:

Dry barrel hydrants. Not to be confused with a dry hydrant.

Dry barrel hydrants are pressurized and work like any other regular hydrant. The difference is that the valve is below the frost line and they drain out through holes below the frost line when closed, as opposed to remaining filled with water to freeze.

A dry hydrant is a non pressurized hydrant that requires suction to draft water through it.

There are also wet barrel hydrants that don’t have a buried valve. They are used in places that it never freezes- which I have always heard and referred to myself as simply wet hydrants. 


It could be a regional thing but “here”:

Fire Hydrant- dry barrel hydrant 

Dry hydrant- drafting hydrant

Wet hydrant- wet barrel hydrant

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In any event all we have here are dry hydrants. 

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All our dry hydrants are going the way of the corn crib. Someday it'll be, "what are those old pipe things by the ponds and cricks?". Someone looking out for us poor rural folks decided we need hydrants and government run water on all our roads. So, they spent zillions and are putting them in all over here. Because yay! Chlorine!! And hydrants for miles where there's nothing to burn!!

You can't see it but my eyes roll so hard they about do a lap when people talk about city water here.

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