Jump to content

Dad's "motor tree"


MTO
 Share

Recommended Posts

My buddies and I pulled and installed quite a few motors under a big crab apple tree beside dad's barn in the early 70s.

Didn't build my first garage till 77.

Funny though  most, as this pic shows, were mopigs. ?

Direct Connection on the licence plate.

That one ain't!

 

 

 

Screenshot_20210418-022901_Facebook.jpg

  • Like 14
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

......I broke an axle  on the   Chevrolet/Rugby    (1928 vintage  )...I put a second  gear box out of a Rugby, behind the Chev 4    gear box.....  Rugby used a "cone clutch" back then  , as ol' timer's like   MTO would remember, thus it was a relatively simple bolt up job...any way, also used Rugby back end with large tyres.....Broke an axle, got the old truck under the tree, and hoisted it 's back end up  etc...put another axle in.....was closing the differential up when my Dad happened along.....He looked long and hard at the job....just nodded  and smiled and wandered away....

Finished the job..lowered   the truck to the ground....engaged reverse gear...and moved briskly forward......Dad had spotted the crown wheel being installed on the wrong side of the differential...thus now offering   a multitude of reverse gears   , but very few forward   gears..

Dad was not offering sympathy....just said a few wise words in respect of "Watching what you are  bloodywell    doing , next time..."

This was around  1960...never had beautiful cars as depicted in  MTO's post above.....

Truck  pictured ....23 inch rear tyres...and it was a convertable ...the cab just lifted off...after undoing a dog collar holding it above the front (!!)  windscreen..... Great hunting /opossuming   truck...OHV   Chev 4   

Mike

post-157-1258538202.jpg

  • Like 8
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There used to be alot of that done years ago. Saw a brown '73 Mustang that had side pipes on, have it's blown little 302, lol, raised in the air by a maple tree limb on a Saturday afternoon and it was back in the school parking lot Monday morning with another 302 donated by a wrecked '68 pickup. Guys used to pull engine's with cars parked along the street on weekends back then. That wouldn't fly nowadays.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish I still had the pictures of my '40 Ford with the blown 371 Olds sitting in front of it on the city street - to my mom's horror. Changed right on the street. The '57 371 J2 gave way to a '59 394 which I later blew as well, followed by a SBC 327.

My cousin was pulling the engine and transmission out of a truck using the tree method and a Ford tractor, rope, and block. He hadn't chocked the wheels and when the drive shaft slipped out the truck backed away headed in the direction of the barn. Lots of family boys watching getting a good laugh with a couple attempting to get it stopped.

I totally agree with the sentiment on the picture. We weren't playing video games on phones, we were learning stuff, albeit the hard way sometimes.

  • Like 4
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Barn beam was my engine bay, fresh air facing south nice work conditions from May -Sept, up here unless you live on an older homestead where the previous owners planted other trees our native weed poplars don’t lend themselves to tree hoists

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, lorenzo said:

Always had a Ford so I never had to do that . 

Right to the salvage yard it went.

My brothers and I were just talking about this the other day. Some of the "safe" ways we pulled engines and trans. Rafters for lifts and old milk cans propped under the bumpers for car supports.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, cedar farm said:

Right to the salvage yard it went.

My brothers and I were just talking about this the other day. Some of the "safe" ways we pulled engines and trans. Rafters for lifts and old milk cans propped under the bumpers for car supports.

??

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL-------rolled my mind back about 30---35 yes to a farm appraisal I did.

The farmer was like alot of folks in those times-------struggling and doing some financial restructuring..  This particular guy lived a lavish lifestyle while the farm operated on a shoestring.  I did not know how thin the shoestring was until I pulled up to his farm hdqtrs to make an inspection.

And------that's when I met the hanging tree!!!  He had a farm manager/mechanic that could make it run----if it would run.  The huge oak tree with the chain hoist was stripped down to the last 3 or 4 limbs.  Remnants of 4010, 4020, 5010, and 5020's were scattered all around with broken limbs and discarded chain hoists.  The farm manager matter of factly stated that the 5010 and 5020's were just too heavy for his lifting apparatus!!!!  

I commented that he "sure needed to be careful!!!!!".[

*****

I know about that shade tree mechanicing myself--------always cooler under a shade tree!!!!?

 

DD

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They were still doing that here alot the street in town here when I was in high school...................but South Williamsport is not anywhere near as large as Williamsport across the river to the north.  One of the vo-tech guys was pulling his small block from his S10, and one of the local cops at the time stopped and offered to run the cherry picker jack while they pulled it.  Probably the whole motive for that was to get the mess off the street quicker, but they did get it out.  

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, cedar farm said:

Rafters for lifts and old milk cans propped under the bumpers for car supports.

Probably better than Harbor Freight Jack Stands.??

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We pulled a 440 out of a gtx by hand ONCE. We stripped the heads and all so it was down to a short block. We then had two poles across the fenders with chains. We heaved the poles up on our shoulders and carried it out. We found a cherry picker to put it back in.

Thx-Ace 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Local co-op took the board members on a bus trip to somewhere my Dad was one of them. Probably should not have an only somewhat responsible 16 year old at home. When he returned the 67 Mustang was under the old piss elm tree. Block , crank and heads from the 289 were at the machine shop. Around 1400 or so my bale bucking money was gone. It went over better than I expected in fact a couple of months later he said he was using my car. I could here him banging gears coming back from town. All he said you better be careful and why does it shake so bad at the stop lights ? 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Friend had a mid 70's Scout that rod cap came loose and stopped the engine.  I pulled the slant 4-196 out under the tree, laid it on the ground pulled the pan and repaired the problem, all in the winter under the tarp in a snow bank.  It ran for several years before he traded it for something else.  Same tree allowed me to pull a 198 diesel that was broke out of a '78 Scout Traveller  and later install a 345 V8 in its place.  Everything bolted in.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had a nice big maple tree for those times. We had a local guy with a 69 Nova called Novocain, 427 , 4 speed. He lived in town and used to  pull the motor from a tree along the curb.

My brother had a 70 challenger 340. One slick fit in the trunk and I had to sit in the back seat with the other. No floor jack, had to use bumper jack to change slicks and uncap hearders at the track. Those things were downright hazardous.

2 hours ago, junkandcattle said:

All he said you better be careful and why does it shake so bad at the stop lights

Remember the Die Hard commercial where the parents borrowed the kids car, I think it was maybe a 67 cuda fastback with the metal flake cobwebbed paint job, classic.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, mike newman said:

......I broke an axle  on the   Chevrolet/Rugby    (1928 vintage  )...I put a second  gear box out of a Rugby, behind the Chev 4    gear box.....  Rugby used a "cone clutch" back then  , as ol' timer's like   MTO would remember, thus it was a relatively simple bolt up job...any way, also used Rugby back end with large tyres.....Broke an axle, got the old truck under the tree, and hoisted it 's back end up  etc...put another axle in.....was closing the differential up when my Dad happened along.....He looked long and hard at the job....just nodded  and smiled and wandered away....

Finished the job..lowered   the truck to the ground....engaged reverse gear...and moved briskly forward......Dad had spotted the crown wheel being installed on the wrong side of the differential...thus now offering   a multitude of reverse gears   , but very few forward   gears..

Dad was not offering sympathy....just said a few wise words in respect of "Watching what you are  bloodywell    doing , next time..."

This was around  1960...never had beautiful cars as depicted in  MTO's post above.....

Truck  pictured ....23 inch rear tyres...and it was a convertable ...the cab just lifted off...after undoing a dog collar holding it above the front (!!)  windscreen..... Great hunting /opossuming   truck...OHV   Chev 4   

Mike

post-157-1258538202.jpg

Dad and an uncle had a 1932 Reo Speedwagon truck that had a cab/tray arrangement like that.  The seat was the front of the tray and originally that had been a padded arrangement.  By then the padding was a corn bag.

A neighbour borrowed it and, at return Uncle asked how he found it?

The reply was that it was a truck that you had to get used to.  First you had to wear holes in your arse for the nail heads.  And then develop the skills to land back on them after hitting the bumps.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

yeah...good one, Ian

..it sounds like a typical   ""down under''    truck of that era, when things were just cobbled together ......and even in the New Zealand rural  scene, one never  saw a troffic crap....

I used to have a hatred for "school trips''..back in the early fifties...invariably I would get to ride in my friends Dad's,  ancient  Vauxhall.....  a piece of British engineering that then  had seen many summers......it had two spare wheels..mounted on either front mudgaurd.......and as the tyres were totally stuffed...we would be parked up on the roadside somewhere ...wrestling    with spare wheels and jacks and other pieces of essential equipment.....whilst the other kids motored   on by, shouting words that were quite inflammatory  for those times......:(

Road deaths  were few and far between.....as most of those pre  WW2    relics were incapable of  gathering   much momentum......

Mike

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, mike newman said:

Road deaths  were few and far between.....as most of those pre  WW2    relics were incapable of  gathering   much momentum......

Mike,

Around that area  and era in Europe

Re Salmson "It made automobiles ranging from an exquisite 45-cu-in (750cc) racing car to an indestructible small family car of no performance whatever".

Quoted from Herschel Smith "A History of Aircraft Piston Engines".

Salmson did the first practical "high horsepower" (relatively) aircraft radial engines around WW 1.  They were water cooled. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...