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New iron in my neighborhood...


Sledgehammer

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8 hours ago, KWRB said:

This thread makes me wonder, does anyone buy a new anvil? How few anvils must be sold new on the entire planet every year? I'd bet there's like one foundry that made a run of them in like 1985, and they're still selling from that inventory.

https://www.oleoacresfarriersupply.com/products/category/blacksmith_anvils?gclid=Cj0KCQjwjPaCBhDkARIsAISZN7SRHWp4jK7DR46K01Q-GZaUGbQcvI4rjSxHDUSZNPPBMAyA-XUPPzAaArz5EALw_wcB

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8 hours ago, stronger800 said:

The guy that bought my hay budden (That we inherited, not from family, moved around around for years, finally decided I had moved it enough) anyway, he bounced a steel ball bearing on it, to determine its quality. So he told me anyway. Sounded legit, but I think there as a dead spot in it someplace. Steel bounced and sounded different.

whats that about? 

That is “rebound” most likely.  The anvils ability to return energy it was struck with. I have played with rebound some just for fun. Take a ball bearing.  If the anvil is 10” tall, drop it from 10” over the anvil. If it bounces back 9”, you have 90% rebound. (Example for easy math)  Another reason he may have done that was to hear the ring. A cracked anvil or one that was repaired improperly won’t always ring true. It will sound more dull. You want to do the sound test to it with it sitting on a solid surface and not lashed down. If an anvil is hard mounted it won’t ring true either even though mounting solid has no affect or anvil quality.  Like hitting a symbol on a stand or hitting it in your hand. Crash or thud.  Does that make sense?

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That’s essentially what I was thinking. I remember him holding his hand flat, dropping the bearing, and it didn’t make it all the way back up to his hand. He was talking, but honest, I was more interested in the tires on his duramax as I was planning to order the same ones. ( Toyo at3)

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3 minutes ago, stronger800 said:

That’s essentially what I was thinking. I remember him holding his hand flat, dropping the bearing, and it didn’t make it all the way back up to his hand. He was talking, but honest, I was more interested in the tires on his duramax as I was planning to order the same ones. ( Toyo at3)

To be honest, I don’t take too much stock in the rebound test personally. If you have a hammer and an anvil with properly heated metal sandwiched between them under force, I can tell you what will move. A ball bearing won’t help you. ?

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6 hours ago, Rainman said:

Now I have to hide my anvil from public view, I'm too embrassed to show it...

Todd you did Good!?

You’ve got to show. it ALL anvils matter Paul ?

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It’s getting the top shaved tomorrow. I will get some pics of that process hopefully. I’m working nights, so before I left, it got loaded into the truck.  ????

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7 minutes ago, Qc.Can.IH man said:

I was supposed to post this in your other anvil topic, Here is a picture of mine that’s been around the farm for I don’t know how many years!
2B9F11DC-1BC5-46D1-9A33-ECECA897F06B.thumb.jpeg.c0f47f3eb48a3aea22577edc97a06b5b.jpegE6F235D3-5915-4ACD-B5A0-BBE3BB76AE46.thumb.jpeg.05dd2e61660020aad4ea1d1aeb11a132.jpeg

Yikes man, that is a monster. 285lbs by the numbers. Nice crisp markings and what looks to be an excellent condition all around. Peter Wright are nice anvils. Good one!

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22 hours ago, stronger800 said:

The guy that bought my hay budden (That we inherited, not from family, moved around around for years, finally decided I had moved it enough) anyway, he bounced a steel ball bearing on it, to determine its quality. So he told me anyway. Sounded legit, but I think there as a dead spot in it someplace. Steel bounced and sounded different.

whats that about? 

It's a hardness check. Most hardness tests (Rockwell, Brinell etc.) are conducted on sample pieces, which are small and irreversibly marred (indented) in the process. There's a much less common test that involves a calibrated bouncing steel ball, called the Leeb Hardness test, that tests just this way. What you've described is a casual version of the same.

In manufacturing an anvil, it would be primarily cast (pouring liquid metal into a sand mold until it freezes). However, plain cast iron wouldn't be a good surface to be pounding and shaping steel on. That working surface would need to be hardened post-casting. It might be induction case hardened or it could be forged, but either way it's not through-hardened. Through hardened would be bad. Anyway, if it's been resurfaced, or worn and damaged, or maybe just wasn't well hardened to begin with, you won't have as much rebound.

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6 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

You’ve got to show. it ALL anvils matter Paul ?

No Way Jose, I'd be Red Power Laughing Stock!!

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Well......It didn’t work quite the way we planned.....  Anvil Is 12” tall and would not fit under the cutter my buddy planned to use. He isn’t a machinist by trade. In his words “I’m just a lineman with fun toys”. The anvil was way too hard for the shorter tooling and high speed steel cutter. It’s going to need a carbide cutter. Lucky for me, I have another buddy that is a machinist by trade and has the correct tooling. No harm done.  Just won’t get finished this weekend. Stay tuned and I will update once I get it finished. 

E8BDD299-5C53-49D6-BCD6-259198B242C2.jpeg

7D261E13-3E53-4972-8B4F-4FB97D38AE53.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Well......It didn’t work quite the way we planned.....  Anvil Is 12” tall and would not fit under the cutter my buddy planned to use. He isn’t a machinist by trade. In his words “I’m just a lineman with fun toys”. The anvil was way too hard for the shorter tooling and high speed steel cutter. It’s going to need a carbide cutter. Lucky for me, I have another buddy that is a machinist by trade and has the correct tooling. No harm done.  Just won’t get finished this weekend. Stay tuned and I will update once I get it finished. 

E8BDD299-5C53-49D6-BCD6-259198B242C2.jpeg

7D261E13-3E53-4972-8B4F-4FB97D38AE53.jpeg

Oh, the stories all those nicks and dents could tell.

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37 minutes ago, yellowrosefarm said:

Oh, the stories all those nicks and dents could tell.

I know, I know. If it was going to sit in the corner of a mechanical shop and get used for straightening and bending once in a while I wouldn’t touch it. Since I will use it in the forging process I can actually transfer those “nicks and dents” over to my metal pieces with a hammer blow. It’s not here for rustic scenery. My first anvil had a considerable sway back and I always hated that. Ever since then, I have wanted one as smooth as I could get it. Trust me, I fully get what you are saying.  If I want to reflect on the old school I still have this 1896 dated poster to take me back but my beard isn’t that long and I don’t smoke a pipe. ?

F0A0743A-F71C-4B83-A74B-2BC4BABB6788.jpeg

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I wasn't implying don't clean it up at all. Just wondering about all the stuff made or repaired on that chunk of iron. I think it's beyond cool that you are able to resurface it.  You pretty much hammered out my use of an anvil right here " If it was going to sit in the corner of a mechanical shop and get used for straightening and bending once in a while "  That's exactly what I've done with this one for the last 40 years since I bought it in an antique store in Richmond for $100.  I never thought to look before you brought it up, but it does have "William Foster" and a big 184 on the side. I had it sitting on an elm block for a long time, but needed the floor space so it moved onto the workbench.

anvil 001.JPG

anvil 002.JPG

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32 minutes ago, yellowrosefarm said:

I wasn't implying don't clean it up at all. Just wondering about all the stuff made or repaired on that chunk of iron. I think it's beyond cool that you are able to resurface it.  You pretty much hammered out my use of an anvil right here " If it was going to sit in the corner of a mechanical shop and get used for straightening and bending once in a while "  That's exactly what I've done with this one for the last 40 years since I bought it in an antique store in Richmond for $100.  I never thought to look before you brought it up, but it does have "William Foster" and a big 18 on the side. I had it sitting on an elm block for a long time, but needed the floor space so it moved onto the workbench.

anvil 001.JPG

anvil 002.JPG

I will have to look up William Foster. That is a new one on me. The design looks English to me vs American but I will try and remember next time I’m home around my book. The Vulcan is a well thought of anvil. A little more unique because their emblem was raised instead of being embossed. Fisher had a raised emblem also.  Easily confused with Arm & Hammer because they have almost the same emblem except for the wording. The emblem on my own A&H below for reference. 

D4385BAB-33BD-400A-827E-15A44691C5C9.jpeg

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On 3/26/2021 at 9:34 PM, Sledgehammer said:

Yikes man, that is a monster. 285lbs by the numbers. Nice crisp markings and what looks to be an excellent condition all around. Peter Wright are nice anvils. Good one!

Thanks!

She’s a heavy one all right!  Sometimes I have to move it around a bit to use it, it sits in a crowded area of my shop, the block of wood it sits on adds a few pounds too!

 

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Nice job on the mount. I have a new appreciation for something I thought was common but not that large ours I would have said around 120. Why did the larger ones come about? Was it to handle larger smithing? I am now watching two on an auction site in Mazeppa MN, my old home town. One is around 230 and the other they say is 4-500lbs. Yikes I would hate to have that roll off on your foot.

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44 minutes ago, VacDaddyt said:

Nice job on the mount. I have a new appreciation for something I thought was common but not that large ours I would have said around 120. Why did the larger ones come about? Was it to handle larger smithing? I am now watching two on an auction site in Mazeppa MN, my old home town. One is around 230 and the other they say is 4-500lbs. Yikes I would hate to have that roll off on your foot.

Larger anvils have always been around. There weren’t as many large ones made as smaller ones. More mass takes more use/abuse. An old blacksmith told me when I was starting to get a 100-125lb anvil to use for you or get a 150lb plus sized anvil if you want something your grandkids can use. Most of them don’t get used like I use one which still isn’t every day. As far as larger sizes handling larger jobs?  I wouldn’t say that was necessarily the case. Everyone has certain preferences to how they set up and use their anvil. I like a fairly wide face that is flat and smooth personally. 

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