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New iron in my neighborhood...


Sledgehammer
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So in one of the blacksmithing threads a couple weeks ago while everyone was talking about stuff @m.c.farmerboy mentioned having a large anvil. We had messaged back and forth about some other things before so I sent him a message asking about it. I enjoyed trying to figure out what everyone had in that thread and figured I’d get some more details and do the same for this one. Well, long story short, we came to an agreement and I own that anvil now. I had it shipped via Fastenal freight.  Big thanks to MC Farmerboy for a new friendship and a nice transaction. I have always been impressed in any dealings I have had with Red Power members. 
 

Hay Budden anvil - 230lbs. Made in 1918 or 1919. 

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230 pounds is fairly heavy. I moved it by hand a time or two and decided to work smarter, not harder. Just because you can, does not mean you should.... A couple sling straps and the old chain hoist fixed the problem. 

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Next I took an oak spool I had for my very first anvil years ago and marked it up for a weight loss program. Also cut blocks to mount the anvil with out of red oak I had. Everything got a thick brush coat of linseed oil for protection after the spool got a chainsaw diet.  

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I normally clean an anvil up with a cup brush and wipe liberally with linseed oil for protection. This one got the same treatment.  The stamping is fairly clear on this one.

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Finished until Saturday morning. I am going to mill about .02” off the face to leave a perfectly smooth and clean face. This is personal preference of mine. The face is good on it already. 

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Feel free to add whatever pics you want or more ID pics of what you have. I’ve had several questions about how I mount them and what I use so there it is. ?

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I need to do a little leveling because I like the anvil face to be level. I slipped some shims under the anvil but would be better off shimming the spool. 

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2 minutes ago, Lazy WP said:

How do you mill the face? That looks amazing!!

Fasten it to a milling machine and use a carbide rotary cutter to remove about .01” at a time and make a couple passes. It doesn’t take the temper out of the face and leaves it very nice and clean. Here is the face of another one a buddy helped me with. He is the machinist, not me. We leveled the base first and then smoothed the top. 

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Awesome to hear that you have your own anvil now ! Especially when you know how to properly use it. A big thanks to Mark for helping you with this . I am sure you won't forget about when you got your anvil your whole life Todd

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I’ve toyed with the idea of making a branding iron of my touch mark and branding the stump on the side. I thought that would look cool. 

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11 minutes ago, bitty said:

Awesome to hear that you have your own anvil now ! Especially when you know how to properly use it. A big thanks to Mark for helping you with this . I am sure you won't forget about when you got your anvil your whole life Todd

Biggest one but not the first ? That little fella belonged to one of my Great Grandfathers.  It is handy for certain tasks. I’ve never been one to sell much blacksmithing stuff but I am not afraid to upgrade from time to time. I’ve wanted a large anvil for a long time and this was the one. I have another Hay Budden and I feel that they have a harder face than some other brands (no science to back it up). They were made with a tool steel upper half or face plate depending on age. 

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42 minutes ago, stronger800 said:

  Nice. I believe we have seen that picture of the one being machined flat before, correct? I thought maybe you were going to mount the new one onto your boy’s workbench.

I try to pay attention

Yes, I have posted the machining pic before. This anvil makes the boy’s bench look small. I might have to stage a picture.....?? My blacksmithing mentor has a 300lb anvil and when he got it he sent me a picture of it with a 20lb sledge siting on top that said “does the hammer make my anvil look small?”  

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So I am going to show my ignorance, an anvil is forged? That means it was molten metal then “poured “ into a mold?

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3 minutes ago, Lazy WP said:

So I am going to show my ignorance, an anvil is forged? That means it was molten metal then “poured “ into a mold?

Complicated.  Some are. I believe during the time these were made (early 1900’s) that they poured blanks and finished them red hot under large scale steam hammers. Different makers made them differently. Some were a single solid material, some were half and half, and others had a hard plate forge welded on for a face that was hard steel. To further complicate matters, some makers changed techniques during production to save money or with an ownership change. 

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This thread makes me wonder, does anyone buy a new anvil? How few anvils must be sold new on the entire planet every year? I'd bet there's like one foundry that made a run of them in like 1985, and they're still selling from that inventory.

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14 minutes ago, KWRB said:

This thread makes me wonder, does anyone buy a new anvil? How few anvils must be sold new on the entire planet every year? I'd bet there's like one foundry that made a run of them in like 1985, and they're still selling from that inventory.

There are a few manufacturers out there. Farrier supply houses sell them a lot of times it seems. The new ones are expensive. I’ve never used a newer one to know if they are worth it. 

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very cool stuff there Sledge, so glad you have one, I sure enjoy mine.

@KWRB there are a lot of new anvils out there for sale you would be surprised they are spendy for sure 

no clue the brand of mine or anything - its heavy and has been resurfaced i guess someone wore it out before me and had to put a new top on it - will get a picture one of these days when i remember

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The guy that bought my hay budden (That we inherited, not from family, moved around around for years, finally decided I had moved it enough) anyway, he bounced a steel ball bearing on it, to determine its quality. So he told me anyway. Sounded legit, but I think there as a dead spot in it someplace. Steel bounced and sounded different.

whats that about? 

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