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1486 steering cylinder


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Working on tightening up the steering on the "14".

Replaced both tie rods. 

I noticed the steering cylinder was loose, not anchored.

The top bolt (6) was missing. Inspection mirror showed empty hole down to cylinder or to top of sheared off bolt???

The cylinder can move around on the bottom bolt (6) although bolt is tight. 

15/16" socket on bottom so assumed 5/8" bolt. 

Tried putting 5/8" bolt in top but too small. 3/4" bolt too big..

Wanted to pull bottom bolt out so I could get the cylinder out to where I could see what was going on (broken bolt?).

It was tight enough I was afraid I would break it and lose use of feed tractor.

 Very possible it has been like this a long time but still makes me nervous enough to prioritize getting it fixed.

I could not find bolt size in parts list. Anyone know?

Is it possible the trunnion cap or caps (7) are hogged out in the cylinder from missing top bolt?

I really don't want to risk breaking something on the bottom to get the cylinder out to see what is going on without having the parts on hand to fix it. Can't afford to be down. 

If I had 2 bolts and 2 trunnion caps, I wouldn't mind trying to break the bottom bolt loose and dealing with it if it breaks. 

Center arm pivot pin (3) is sloppy also so will be replacing that if needed along with bushings. 

Pretty sure Front axle pivot pin (15) and bushings will need attention also. 

What am I missing? Any ideas?

After seeing this I will probably slow down a gear going up and down the river hill!

16228770_1486steeringcylinder.thumb.jpg.019299272025f16d1c2cebae12664832.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Sandhiller,

Parts book calls for two each 531237R1 trunnion cap (#32) and 531238R1 bolt with 575812R1 washer (both sub-part numbers). Bolt is 5/8 x 18 GR 8, 1.6" long. That's all I can help with.

While greasing the front end on the "new to me" 886 today, I also have some concerns about the the front end pins, trunnions, and tie-rods. This ole' girl was cowboyed.

Good luck to you. Hope the momma cows stay fed!

 

86 Front End.png

 

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4 hours ago, sandhiller said:

Working on tightening up the steering on the "14".

Replaced both tie rods. 

I noticed the steering cylinder was loose, not anchored.

The top bolt (6) was missing. Inspection mirror showed empty hole down to cylinder or to top of sheared off bolt???

The cylinder can move around on the bottom bolt (6) although bolt is tight. 

15/16" socket on bottom so assumed 5/8" bolt. 

Tried putting 5/8" bolt in top but too small. 3/4" bolt too big..

Wanted to pull bottom bolt out so I could get the cylinder out to where I could see what was going on (broken bolt?).

It was tight enough I was afraid I would break it and lose use of feed tractor.

 Very possible it has been like this a long time but still makes me nervous enough to prioritize getting it fixed.

I could not find bolt size in parts list. Anyone know?

Is it possible the trunnion cap or caps (7) are hogged out in the cylinder from missing top bolt?

I really don't want to risk breaking something on the bottom to get the cylinder out to see what is going on without having the parts on hand to fix it. Can't afford to be down. 

If I had 2 bolts and 2 trunnion caps, I wouldn't mind trying to break the bottom bolt loose and dealing with it if it breaks. 

Center arm pivot pin (3) is sloppy also so will be replacing that if needed along with bushings. 

Pretty sure Front axle pivot pin (15) and bushings will need attention also. 

What am I missing? Any ideas?

After seeing this I will probably slow down a gear going up and down the river hill!

16228770_1486steeringcylinder.thumb.jpg.019299272025f16d1c2cebae12664832.jpg

 

 

 

 

Trunnion p/n  531237R1 
Bolt p/n 531237R1
Washer p/n 575812R1 subs to 95-81019
Bushing p/n 533283R1
All are readily available.

Suggest using blue loctite and torquing the bolts to 170 foot pounds. 
The bolts used have an unusual length, and thread to shank ratio, best to get the correct part here.

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Take a GOOD look at the rear pivot ball & socket.  If there's wear in the pivot pin in front the rear pivot ball and socket will be wallowed out.

My very first job at FARMALL was running a big industrial washing machine that cleaned the water soluable cutting oil off the frt axle casting, also washed the axle extensions from the drilling for push-in grease zerks and machining for bronze bushings. And I washed a pallet box of steering cylinders or two every night. I pressed the pivot bushings in the center bore and installed the pivot ball too, then hung the axle on a roller skate that held the axle on the storage rack.  I started on 1st shift, guy doing that job twisted or severely sprained his ankle, then about 2 months later I come in and he's back! Boss has me push a broom for 3-4 hours then tells me I can go but be back at 4 PM and I'm on 2nd shift from then on. Was actually nicer working 2nd shift. But some nights it was REALLY hard to find enough work to keep me busy. I watched a guy build up the steering cylinders one night, he asked if I wanted to build one, I'd run that job for an hour or two a night after that.  It was all about keeping busy so the time went by faster.  The machine that did all the machining on the axle casting, the FOOTBURT-REYNOLDS was an old Numerical controlled transfer machine, think there were 5 stations, the machine covered an area 40 ft by 60 feet. Some nights it ran O-K, other nights it didn't, my buddy that ran it watched while electricians and machine repair guys tried to get it working. Forman sent me over to the BONDERIZER to hang sheet metal parts to be cleaned and phosphatized and painted. NO PRIMER, most stuff was painted 2150 red. The white parts were painted on the same line but separately.  Speaking of paint, the wall made from corrugated steel roofing right behind my washing machine where I "Bushed and balled" the frt axles separated ME from the Start Line main paint booth. 2-3 guys painting EVERYTHING 2150 as the tractor creeped along. A tractor every 2-3 minutes.

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On the later tractors possibly when the redstripes first appeared they went to pins on the rear pivot plus used metric hardware

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Thank you for the info guys!

@messer9696 and @Maynard appreciate the parts numbers. I am going to have to get better at using the parts book.😄

Local old IH dealer should have the parts or be able to get them, they are really good about it. 

And @DOCTOR EVIL, when you get your book out (hint hint). I would like to be early in line for a signed copy! Always enjoy reading your posts of you history with IH.

@ksfarmdude Earlier model and pretty sure I have ball and socket as as Doctor Evil said probably worn and wallered out but need to look over that too.  

The recently purchased 1486 was rode hard and put up wet but I knew that going in so don't mind the TLC here and there to bring her back up to snuff.

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2 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

Thank you for the info guys!

@messer9696 and @Maynard appreciate the parts numbers. I am going to have to get better at using the parts book.😄

Local old IH dealer should have the parts or be able to get them, they are really good about it. 

And @DOCTOR EVIL, when you get your book out (hint hint). I would like to be early in line for a signed copy! Always enjoy reading your posts of you history with IH.

@ksfarmdude Earlier model and pretty sure I have ball and socket as as Doctor Evil said probably worn and wallered out but need to look over that too.  

The recently purchased 1486 was rode hard and put up wet but I knew that going in so don't mind the TLC here and there to bring her back up to snuff.

One thing about the ball, new replacement balls had the OD increased a little where it passes through the axle to help them tighten up better. However, if the ball has been wallowing around and the front and back sides of the axle are no longer square to each other a ball will not stay tight for long.

If, that is the case, strip the axle down and take it to a machine shop and have a bushing made to get it back to spec.

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5 hours ago, messer9696 said:

How come there is no grease zerk on the stay ball? Or, has my tractor not been greased in 42 years? 🤪

Always wondered that as well. Ours all have them though, as do all the tractors that come through our shop for axle work. Easy to install, as none of them had them from the factory.

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Those cylinder assemblies can develop alot of slack. It's over engineered. It could be done much simpler.

Thx-Ace 

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2 hours ago, acem said:

Those cylinder assemblies can develop alot of slack. It's over engineered. It could be done much simpler.

Thx-Ace 

Man, you got that right! You get one area tightened up and then you realize how loose everything else is. I compare it to the transmission shifting linkage. 

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16 hours ago, acem said:

Those cylinder assemblies can develop alot of slack. It's over engineered. It could be done much simpler.

Thx-Ace 

 

13 hours ago, TB5288 said:

Man, you got that right! You get one area tightened up and then you realize how loose everything else is. I compare it to the transmission shifting linkage. 

Actually, they were either underengineered or cost cut to not being as reliable as they could have been. 

Changes made later included hardened bushings and pivot pin for the cylinder youke The ends of the yoke were then machined with flats and thick and thin washers were made available to shim out the vertical movement. At the same time, an o-ring groove was cut in the ends of the pivot bore for o-rings to keep the grease in and dirt out.

One modification that can be done during a rebuild is to use a press to squeeze the vertical opening to reduce excessive vertical clearance between the trunnions and cyilnder pivots. This was recommended in an IH service bulletin from way back. 

Changing the cylinder anchor end from the block with a headed pin to a ball joint was also done at the same time IIRC.

One of the best improvements was the one piece (metric) bolster that had a pin at the rear instead of the ball. Rare to ever find one of those worn and sloppy.

Jim N.

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On 3/21/2021 at 8:44 AM, Maynard said:

One thing about the ball, new replacement balls had the OD increased a little where it passes through the axle to help them tighten up better. However, if the ball has been wallowing around and the front and back sides of the axle are no longer square to each other a ball will not stay tight for long.

If, that is the case, strip the axle down and take it to a machine shop and have a bushing made to get it back to spec.

Is it possible to get the original size? I've changed 2 here now that the the axle side was not wore at all and tried to find ones that are not the larger od and no luck. 

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