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I agree I was born in 84 and grew up in the 90s. Everything just seemed to be better back than. If you got offended you just shook your head and walked away and waited til the next day. Nowadays you get offended jump on youtube or Facebook and whine like a baby and you get a thousand people to coddle you.

 

 

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I walked to the YMCA carrying my 22 to ride the bus to the BC rifle range - In Boston! (where I found a heavy barreled, peep sighted target rifle did better than my scoped Remington!) In the fall it was common to see a deer strapped to the car hoods in the city as no one had PU trucks.

Nun needed to cut something and asked if any boy had a pocket knife and of course we all did, one of the kids with a switch blade which only got a "my, that's a big one Johnny" from the nun.

My FIL, in rural VA, would carry his 22 to school to got rabbit or squirrel hunting in the '40s.

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49 minutes ago, 756puller said:

I agree I was born in 84 and grew up in the 90s. Everything just seemed to be better back than. If you got offended you just shook your head and walked away and waited til the next day. Nowadays you get offended jump on youtube or Facebook and whine like a baby and you get a thousand people to coddle you.

 

 

Yep because the kiddos after us (86 model here) started having to wear a bicycle helmets! If you break it down that’s when a lot of this started- when they took the hurt out of stupid!!!

 

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I was born in 73. Boys were raised to be tough, God fearing and protective of women. Good values were taught by my parents and most everyone else around.  I do the same thing with my kids.  My boys are tough,  yet respectful and God fearing.  They don't take sass. 17 year old just signed up for the Marines.  Middle boy at 12 plays outside and never complains. Youngest boy at 5 is a cowboy, carrying his wooden pistol everywhere.  My little girl,  10, is everything a girl should be,  sweet, loving,  caring and still tough.  Each of the oldest 3 have corrected their teachers,  respectfully,   and have been active in getting friends to Church,  learning about true American history,  and all are good shots. America will live on,  but we need to actively fight the lunacy being taught to our kids.  

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Frank H   good job with them young ones,   

I was born 57 four kids all self employed  6 grand kids 

I didn't have much say with the grand kids but they got the fear of god in them

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I tell every one it's easy to raise kids out in the country,

Nobody hears them cry when they get there back side blistered ! and  there hearing is not obstructed as bad 

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2 hours ago, zleinenbach said:

Yep because the kiddos after us (86 model here) started having to wear a bicycle helmets! If you break it down that’s when a lot of this started- when they took the hurt out of stupid!!!

 

No respect for anything or anyone because there is never a lesson learned.

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1 hour ago, junkandcattle said:

No respect for anything or anyone because there is never a lesson learned.

Yes- I see it at work daily. Accountability and responsibility are just about extinct.

when you do use these traits people are almost taken back by it.

 

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My youngest daughter 26, just arrived from NYC yesterday to visit for a few days. I always worry a little where city living will take them and how it will shape their views of the world. I must say, I felt good about things when I got home from work and got a big hug and saw her sweatshirt that said: "My strawberry jams, but my Glock don't"?

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I’ve mentioned this before so pass if you read it before, I love these threads and I think a lot of us think the same way and I know Jeffy and I do, I was born in ‘48, started school in ‘53, got picked up from our house in Burnaby taken to school in a ‘51 or ‘52 fordor, had a nickel to catch a bus in front of the school to go home, didn’t always get home on time because I had a roaming spirit that I still have and that was much to the chagrin of my folks, I never had a problem even at that age, little boys were everywhere and my desire to not trust anyone was in bloom then.

My eighth birthday was dinner out at a Woolworth luncheonette, buying a pocket knife, and given money to go see Moby Dick, popcorn, and a bus home, my life basically was like the beginnings and to this day albeit older of course the same devil may care living conditions, my kids born of the 70s were brought up the same way and no ill effects, I know you rural guys had a different lifestyle, how do I know?  My cousins lived on farmland and my folks  had ranchers and farmers as friends, but even though me being cityfied I always had a solo streak, the helicopter style desired today just isn’t letting people grow and live, if my days of growing up were allowed now my folks would have to answer to some brain dead pencil neck bureaucrat,  because some rat neighbor would stick their nose in like everyone wants to be on top of everything that everyone does, this social media crap is just that, anonymous bullying crap.

 

 

 

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20 hours ago, sandhiller said:

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Heck ya! Was born in '78. I miss the way things were when i was a kid!

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15 hours ago, Dasnake said:

I’ve mentioned this before so pass if you read it before, I love these threads and I think a lot of us think the same way and I know Jeffy and I do, I was born in ‘48, started school in ‘53, got picked up from our house in Burnaby taken to school in a ‘51 or ‘52 fordor, had a nickel to catch a bus in front of the school to go home, didn’t always get home on time because I had a roaming spirit that I still have and that was much to the chagrin of my folks, I never had a problem even at that age, little boys were everywhere and my desire to not trust anyone was in bloom then.

My eighth birthday was dinner out at a Woolworth luncheonette, buying a pocket knife, and given money to go see Moby Dick, popcorn, and a bus home, my life basically was like the beginnings and to this day albeit older of course the same devil may care living conditions, my kids born of the 70s were brought up the same way and no ill effects, I know you rural guys had a different lifestyle, how do I know?  My cousins lived on farmland and my folks  had ranchers and farmers as friends, but even though me being cityfied I always had a solo streak, the helicopter style desired today just isn’t letting people grow and live, if my days of growing up were allowed now my folks would have to answer to some brain dead pencil neck bureaucrat,  because some rat neighbor would stick their nose in like everyone wants to be on top of everything that everyone does, this social media crap is just that, anonymous bullying crap.

 

 

 

1960 model farm kid walked and roamed everywhere. We carried guns all winter and tore things apart just to see how they worked ( when we were not working ). The onery kids were the preachers boys and the wild ones were the preachers daughters.

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1964  Model here,   Youngest of five kids ( four girls ahead of me )  Sisters all drove standard shift, I remember flocks of boys

hanging round the house ,  One particular suitor ( Later became Brother in law) would fight like the dickens with my sister

and then hop in his car all pissed off ,  I WAITED FOR THIS,   He had a 68 RS Camaro with an honest to goodness 283 stock car motor that

turned 7500 rpm , He would leave the driveway with that chevy at redline ,Grabbin every gear of that Hurst shifted muncie , He became

a great friend and B-in-law  , RIP Dave

Dad and Gramp's were always bringing more stuff back from the dump than was brought, At nine or ten years old  I got to drive gramp's 64 Ford pickup

clear across town to the dump , I'm quite sure he was wincing everytime I had to change gears with that floppy column shifter and he gave me

a stern warning to hold the steering wheel TIGHT when the brakes were used .

The Town Dump as I remember was more of a social gathering spot , Everyone had time to say Hello and ask about current events and how is so and so

doing , I was never so proud as when I reversed the old Ford up to the trash pile and Gramps got out and mentioned to another fella I was his youngest

Grandson and driving already .  

Every day I would wait for Gramp's to come home from work , I would run to the cold cellar and get him a tall bottle of Ballantine Ale and bring it to his

favorite sittin chair , most days I got to take a big sip , before we started tending the garden ,or fixing something .

Gramp's worked for the State Highway dept. He was a senior member of the tree maintenance division

while cutting into a large tree on the side of a highway a huge hornets nest was disturbed and he got stung 75-100 times , He was brought to the hospital

and was on the mend when a young nurse came in the hospital room and gave him a hypodermic shot that was intended for the other guy in the room

He was dead  that afternoon.   Six days from retirement when he passed , The State dept denied my Grammy any pension , She was too grief stricken to

argue about it .

 

I don't mean this post to be pitiful or sad , Just reminiscing about a few

of the events that I remember from growing up ?

 

 

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Great story til the end, awesome you hold the bond you shared dear at 57

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25 minutes ago, Kevingweq said:

I don't mean this post to be pitiful or sad , Just reminiscing about a few

of the events that I remember from growing up ?

Life isn't always fair and can sometimes be pretty rough. 

Thank you for the story of you and your gramps, sorry it ended the way it did. 

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7 hours ago, Kevingweq said:

1964  Model here,   Youngest of five kids ( four girls ahead of me )  Sisters all drove standard shift, I remember flocks of boys

hanging round the house ,  One particular suitor ( Later became Brother in law) would fight like the dickens with my sister

and then hop in his car all pissed off ,  I WAITED FOR THIS,   He had a 68 RS Camaro with an honest to goodness 283 stock car motor that

turned 7500 rpm , He would leave the driveway with that chevy at redline ,Grabbin every gear of that Hurst shifted muncie , He became

a great friend and B-in-law  , RIP Dave

Dad and Gramp's were always bringing more stuff back from the dump than was brought, At nine or ten years old  I got to drive gramp's 64 Ford pickup

clear across town to the dump , I'm quite sure he was wincing everytime I had to change gears with that floppy column shifter and he gave me

a stern warning to hold the steering wheel TIGHT when the brakes were used .

The Town Dump as I remember was more of a social gathering spot , Everyone had time to say Hello and ask about current events and how is so and so

doing , I was never so proud as when I reversed the old Ford up to the trash pile and Gramps got out and mentioned to another fella I was his youngest

Grandson and driving already .  

Every day I would wait for Gramp's to come home from work , I would run to the cold cellar and get him a tall bottle of Ballantine Ale and bring it to his

favorite sittin chair , most days I got to take a big sip , before we started tending the garden ,or fixing something .

Gramp's worked for the State Highway dept. He was a senior member of the tree maintenance division

while cutting into a large tree on the side of a highway a huge hornets nest was disturbed and he got stung 75-100 times , He was brought to the hospital

and was on the mend when a young nurse came in the hospital room and gave him a hypodermic shot that was intended for the other guy in the room

He was dead  that afternoon.   Six days from retirement when he passed , The State dept denied my Grammy any pension , She was too grief stricken to

argue about it .

 

I don't mean this post to be pitiful or sad , Just reminiscing about a few

of the events that I remember from growing up ?

 

 

Thank you for your memory lane story, if you want to could you fill in how your grandmother did after no recompense from the state, it sounds like she had family support which would be a lifesaver after such a black day, take care.

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