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how many people have line fences anymore  i talked to my neighbor about talking the fence out about 25 years ago and clean it up he said go for it i told him that i would no be putting a fence back up but would put wood post back in about 200 feet apart has worked good for all those years till this year i always asked what he planted as to not kill any of his crops always worked nice kept the weeds down and when it flooded had no fence to put back up now he wants a fence back up no livestock or anything like that anybody have any thoughts on what to do

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I’d get the line surveyed for sure but could you just put posts in? Maybe close than the current 200’. If it floods it seems fence would catch debris and just be a pain

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9 minutes ago, b&c farms said:

how many people have line fences anymore  i talked to my neighbor about talking the fence out about 25 years ago and clean it up he said go for it i told him that i would no be putting a fence back up but would put wood post back in about 200 feet apart has worked good for all those years till this year i always asked what he planted as to not kill any of his crops always worked nice kept the weeds down and when it flooded had no fence to put back up now he wants a fence back up no livestock or anything like that anybody have any thoughts on what to do

Same neighbor, or the next generation?

Is there livestock in their future? Is he getting ready to sell? Is he paying 1/2 the costs for a fence? Seems like there’s a few questions that need answers to...

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no livestock he is 75 years old put the farm in trust for his kids wants me to pay for all the fence i payed for all of when i took it out had trees removed he actually got the better deal he got two more rows of corn after i cleaned it all up

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Know a place where therr is high tensile electric fence along a creek bottom.  When it floods all sorts of debris is left hanging on the fence.  This probably happens on average once or twice a year.

I try to be the best neighbor possible but I think I would have a hard to swallowing your neighbor's request.  I think the survey is a good idea but here surveys are rediculously expensive.  Additionally if you survey you may not be happy with the results.  The more I think about it I would find a way out of paying for a fence.

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So, are the posts 200' apart just mark property line?

If you both agree a fence needs to go back in, say a mile of fence. 

You both meet in the middle facing each other. 

The half mile to your right is your fence to build and maintain.

The half mile to his right is his fence to build and maintain. 

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You can take it up the wazoo dealing with neighbors on a fence line. My end of a line fence was old and the neighbor had 15 foot of brush with some falling on my old wire constantly. I agreed to putting in a new fence and 1/2 of the dozer bill if al the brush was removed a win win for him. He was supposed to rebuild his end of the fence in return. We were both running cattle against the fence so we were both accountable. End result I think he put in 4 steel posts, didn't pay any of the dozer bill then sold the farm to a guy who has it all in row crop. The new owner said if I would repair his end he would buy the materials. Well guess who did the repairs and did not see a dime.

Any agreement made with your guy is probably a waste of time

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Whatever you do get it in writing. Even if it is just a notarized hand written agreement. Decades ago grandpa and the neighbor traded ends of the fence in regards to who maintained which half. It was a mutual, verbal agreement made because it would make the half they were each responsible for closer to their respective farmstead. Over the years the neighbor’s half fell into disrepair because of his age and health especially after he got rid of his cows. We would make essential repairs as needed. Once he was gone and the farm sold guess which half the new owner claimed. 

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I would go buy a roll of high tensil wire, a T post for about 100 ft spacing, spend a couple hrs putting up single wire waist high. Done deal, you have no livestock getting on him, he has no livestock getting on you. All happy, you put fence up no cost to him.

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2 or 3 strands of high tensile wire t post every 40 feet and wood post every 200 or so. About the cheapest fence to build I'd stay away from one so no one gets clothslined as they ride a ATV across.  However if he wants it he should pay.... My 2c

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23 hours ago, sandhiller said:

So, are the posts 200' apart just mark property line?

If you both agree a fence needs to go back in, say a mile of fence. 

You both meet in the middle facing each other. 

The half mile to your right is your fence to build and maintain.

The half mile to his right is his fence to build and maintain. 

X2 he has to pay for his share in MN It is the law.

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22 hours ago, mader656 said: However if he wants it he should pay.... My 2c

Present a proposal in writing as to what this will cost HIM, PAID IN FULL BEFORE any work is done. If he wants a fence, he’ll cut a check.

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On 2/21/2021 at 8:34 PM, b&c farms said:

no livestock he is 75 years old put the farm in trust for his kids wants me to pay for all the fence i payed for all of when i took it out had trees removed he actually got the better deal he got two more rows of corn after i cleaned it all up

Here's precisely how I'd handle it:

That old fence has come and gone. Sorry Charlie, if you want to put a fence up, that's your prerogative, but it goes on YOUR property, in YOUR dime, not mine.

Fencing ain't cheap! If you don't have a need or a want for it, it sounds like a whole bunch of not-your-problem

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I have some hay and crop ground that borders neighbors pasture along an abandoned right of way. After his cows got into corn a couple times, he put a fence in. We agreed to run fence down center of right of way. He paid for all as I will never run cows there. Brother has pasture that needed new fence, bordering neighbors had no cows so we paid/did all work. Another neighbor has since told me that SD law is to split cost regardless of livestock situation, but broke landowners will never pony up anyway. If you do not need fence for livestock containment, I'd let neighbor worry about fence

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Here is a link to a quick and dirty article about Nebraska fence law:

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5ae9eb0a697a9837968fb75c/t/5c76f0d2f9619af917f2adbf/1551298781705/Neb.-Fence-Law-2013.pdf

On my father’s farm there were 6 adjoining landowners, and he maintained the left hand portion of all but one segment of fence.  IIRC the one right hand segment was because of who had better access to maintain the fence.  Also some of the segments were of unequal length because of the extra cost of water gaps.  I always wondered how widespread the left hand rule was in the neighborhood.

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My experience as a farmland broker and appraiser--------fences and ditches make for good property line identification.  BUT,-------fences and big equipment don't mix well.

Alternative suggestion:  have property lines surveyed with survey identified on satelite maps------record at courthouse along with an agreement that the surveyed line will always be acknowledged by both parties as the official proprerty line.

The GPS surveys on aerial imagery opens up a new ball game.  Good luck.

DD

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On 2/21/2021 at 6:54 PM, sandhiller said:

So, are the posts 200' apart just mark property line?

If you both agree a fence needs to go back in, say a mile of fence. 

You both meet in the middle facing each other. 

The half mile to your right is your fence to build and maintain.

The half mile to his right is his fence to build and maintain. 

In Idaho, it is the left half from center as you face it.

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5 minutes ago, cobfly said:

In Idaho, it is the left half from center as you face it.

And toilet flush spins backwards in Australia.............it's a confusing world?

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1 minute ago, sandhiller said:

And toilet flush spins backwards in Australia.............it's a confusing world?

True. It was just for a reference. The best thing to do is pull the statutes, and proceed accordingly.

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I have thought about inviting a gay guy to my house, let him use the $hitter, and see if it swirls opposite of my flush. Okay, back to fencing.?

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2 minutes ago, cobfly said:

True. It was just for a reference. The best thing to do is pull the statutes, and proceed accordingly.

Luckily I have good neighbors (six on border fences) and we decided ourselves which parts we will go around in the spring. 

Sad when legal has to get involved.

One neighbor I have 3/4 mile stretch, I go around every spring because it is on of the first pastures I turn into and one of their last. I don't mind, they are good neighbors and will upkeep during the summer when they turn in. 

Breeding season is the worst as bulls love to tear up fence, Anything gets tore up too bad and we will meet, sort cows if needed and fix it together. 

Good fence makes good neighbors!

 

 

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16 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

Luckily I have good neighbors (six on border fences) and we decided ourselves which parts we will go around in the spring. 

Sad when legal has to get involved.

One neighbor I have 3/4 mile stretch, I go around every spring because it is on of the first pastures I turn into and one of their last. I don't mind, they are good neighbors and will upkeep during the summer when they turn in. 

Breeding season is the worst as bulls love to tear up fence, Anything gets tore up too bad and we will meet, sort cows if needed and fix it together. 

Good fence makes good neighbors!

 

 

Truly so.

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3 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

My experience as a farmland broker and appraiser--------fences and ditches make for good property line identification.  BUT,-------fences and big equipment don't mix well.

Alternative suggestion:  have property lines surveyed with survey identified on satelite maps------record at courthouse along with an agreement that the surveyed line will always be acknowledged by both parties as the official proprerty line.

The GPS surveys on aerial imagery opens up a new ball game.  Good luck.

DD

edit:   would recommend both sides split cost of survey------protecting property lines and ownership inevitably is a cost of ownership. The surveyed line protects both parties for the future.

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