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How's green energy working in Texas ?


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The suburban and rural folks who work hard and keep the country running are outshouted and out maneuvered politically by the liberals time and time again because regular folks work,  don't riot, expec

Hang in there, Al Gore is on the way!

Bought a small generator here in town. Out at farm we had a winco pto. Way back when I was young dad bought it during a major outage. They were without power for 2 weeks in 1976 after a ice storm ,bli

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We are experiencing rolling black-outs here in the central Texas hill country. We have no fire place in our house. And no generator. It has been getting down to 52 degrees in the house at  night while the power is out. 

I’m going to be looking in to getting a generator after this debacle. One with enough wattage to keep at least a couple three critical circuits in the house running.
 

I’m going to have an electrician rig up some sort of a cut off switch setup whereby I can easily detach from utility’s grid when I need to so I can run a generator. Just something that I can manually switch back and forth.  I don’t need anything automatic to switch on and off or to automatically start and stop the generator. 

Since we moved to Texas, we’ve had an isolated day or two of cold temps here and there in the winter, but never anything this cold for such a prolonged period of time. This here is horse s-it. My work is even closed, so I’m just staying home trying to keep warm. So far our water is still running. We have city water, not a well. We are keeping our faucets trickling as a hopeful hedge against the lines freezing. 

We have 7” of snow on the ground here in our immediate area, but there was also  an ice storm preceding the snow, and the ice on the trees has brought down numerous branches if not toppled entire trees. I am going to have a big tree mess  to start cleaning up on the property once it warms back up to normal. The last time it was even 32 degrees was Thursday. What a crock. 
 

 

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3 minutes ago, Rick G. said:

We are experiencing rolling black-outs here in the central Texas hill country. We have no fire place in our house. And no generator. It has been getting down to 52 degrees in the house at  night while the power is out. 

I’m going to be looking in to getting a generator after this debacle. One with enough wattage to keep at least a couple three critical circuits in the house running.
 

I’m going to have an electrician rig up some sort of a switch setup whereby I can easily detach from utility’s grid when I need to so I can run a generator. Just something that I can manually switch back and forth.  I don’t need anything automatic to switch on and off or to automatically start and stop the generator. 

Since we moved to Texas, we’ve had an isolated day or two of cold temps here and there in the winter, but never anything this cold for such a prolonged period of time. This here is horse s-it. My work is even closed, so I’m just staying home trying to keep warm. So far our water is still running. We have city water, not a well. We are keeping our faucets trickling as a hopeful hedge against the lines freezing. 

We have 7” of snow on the ground here in our immediate area, but there was also  an ice storm preceding the snow, and the ice on the trees has brought down numerous branches if not toppled entire trees. I am going to have a big tree mess  to start cleaning up on the property once it warms back up to normal. The last time it was even 32 degrees was Thursday. What a crock. 
 

 

Hang in there, Al Gore is on the way!

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I hear ya Rick. I am over in Midland, our house has not yet had the power off, we are on the north side of town close to Midland College. Our son’s house, near old Hwy 80, he has a whole house generator, the power went off at 2:00am Monday and didn’t come back on for 7 hrs. Then they started cutting it off/on every hr or so.

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The suburban and rural folks who work hard and keep the country running are outshouted and out maneuvered politically by the liberals time and time again because regular folks work,  don't riot, expect handouts or hate their country.  It's places like Austin that force unreliable green energy on the regular people who just want reliable electricity.  Green energy is nice for helping the grid but is simply not reliable enough for everyday use.

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Bought a small generator here in town. Out at farm we had a winco pto. Way back when I was young dad bought it during a major outage. They were without power for 2 weeks in 1976 after a ice storm ,blizzard snapped miles of poles. Used it off and on for a long time sometimes up to a day until power was back on. Just a couple years ago the more isolated areas of ranch country here in North Dakota were out of power for 3 weeks. A ice storm went across southern North Dakota. Crews band together but they fix easy short stretches first that get lots of customers back. Then they go to the service that might have 1 or 2 customers on 5 miles of line. Another thing that is next to the golden rule up here in the north. If you have a bad wet ice storm blizzard early in fall or late in spring. You get your 4wd or mfwd tractor started and if power company comes in your area. You take your time and drag their trucks and equipment through the mud and snow or clear a path so they can get to lines to fix them if you want power back. That is just expected of you up here to lend a helping hand. 

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I remember that ‘76 ice storm. I grew up just west of Middleton WI, was sitting in a classroom (7th or 8th grade) in town, power went out that afternoon, was out at home(out in the country) for 10 days. Most of the town folk got power back within 2-3 days.

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11 minutes ago, dale560 said:

Bought a small generator here in town. Out at farm we had a winco pto. Way back when I was young dad bought it during a major outage. They were without power for 2 weeks in 1976 after a ice storm ,blizzard snapped miles of poles. Used it off and on for a long time sometimes up to a day until power was back on. Just a couple years ago the more isolated areas of ranch country here in North Dakota were out of power for 3 weeks. A ice storm went across southern North Dakota. Crews band together but they fix easy short stretches first that get lots of customers back. Then they go to the service that might have 1 or 2 customers on 5 miles of line. Another thing that is next to the golden rule up here in the north. If you have a bad wet ice storm blizzard early in fall or late in spring. You get your 4wd or mfwd tractor started and if power company comes in your area. You take your time and drag their trucks and equipment through the mud and snow or clear a path so they can get to lines to fix them if you want power back. That is just expected of you up here to lend a helping hand. 

that used to be the American way everyone get out and help pull the wagon, now it seems like nobody wants to help pull the wagon any more

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You have to some winter maintance for power stations ,windmills and gen. none was done. Its colder in Indiana and Ohio wiht 10 to 13 inches of snow and our windmills are working just fine.

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2 minutes ago, supermpuller said:

You have to some winter maintance for power stations ,windmills and gen. none was done. Its colder in Indiana and Ohio wiht 10 to 13 inches of snow and our windmills are working just fine.

fair weather wind mills in Texas 

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I kept a 3000 head hog operation going for 13 days with a 25 kw generator once....

NEVER complained about the cost of electricity again!!!?

Mike

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6 minutes ago, mikem said:

I kept a 3000 head hog operation going for 13 days with a 25 kw generator once....

NEVER complained about the cost of electricity again!!!?

Mike

Guy we bought bulls from south of Bismarck. He was a Schaff , from the well known schaff angus family. It was about ten years ago, they were running both ranches on generators, they had a generator going at the rural water and he was helping a neighbor with theirs. This was after a spring storm so it was starting to warm up. They were out for over 3 weeks. Now they are starting roiling blackouts here in North Dakota. We have a big coal powered plant they want to shut down because it’s bad and most of that headed to Minnesota , their governor doesn’t want dirty power.

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12 hours ago, Lars (midessa) said:

I remember that ‘76 ice storm. I grew up just west of Middleton WI, was sitting in a classroom (7th or 8th grade) in town, power went out that afternoon, was out at home(out in the country) for 10 days. Most of the town folk got power back within 2-3 days.

I grew up in Deerfield, just east of Madison. We were without electricity for 4+ days. About the 3rd. day, I was visiting my girlfriend and her family. It was getting cold in the house, and they were talking about what they should do. Well, this rocket scientist girlfriend reminded her Dad that they have an electric heater down the basement and they should bring it upstairs and use it. Dad just shook his head..  And I married her.. 

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19 hours ago, dale560 said:

most of that headed to Minnesota , their governor doesn’t want dirty power.

Our dip$hit governor needs to be impeached!!!!!! He wants to turn MN into the next California!!! If that happens, I’m out of both trucking, and farming!!! I don’t want DEF, can’t afford to buy a whole new line of tractors and combine, and don’t want the headache of the truck!!!! 

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Just read that if we would have had the green new deal in place it would have prevented these outages. ? ? 

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The 'rolling blackout" lasted 47 hours here, which was interesting in that every town, , to the east and west, for 40 miles or so, including Talpa, in which the only 'business' is the post office, had power during that time.

When I moved here, Coleman had one of the highest electric rates in the state, two years ago the city contracted with another supplier and the rate dropped about 40 per cent, but AEP still is the provider of the lines and substations, so I think that this was AEP's way of getting back at all that lost revenue, PLUS, why supply a few thousand, when they can transfer the supply to urban population centers and reap the profit?

Until 5AM, there had been NO trains thru town, which is BNSF's main line between Clovis, NM and Houston, for two days, and the cell service has either been non-existent, or Emergency Calls Only for at least part of each day.

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Sounds like the real problem is not so much green energy as a lack of sense in managing the whole electrical utility system down there.  

“It can’t happen to us."

 

 

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On 2/17/2021 at 9:39 AM, 1466fan said:

Just read that if we would have had the green new deal in place it would have prevented these outages. ? ? 

 

On 2/17/2021 at 9:51 AM, dads706 said:

Glad to see AOC is on top of this electrical problem. however I'm some what confused, I thought the green new deal was to combat rising temps, not freezing cold. AOC must have divided instead of subtracting when working out the math calculation. but what do I know.

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On 2/17/2021 at 12:26 PM, Gearclash said:

Sounds like the real problem is not so much green energy as a lack of sense in managing the whole electrical utility system down there.  

“It can’t happen to us."

 

 

First of all, one needs full power output available by coal, nuke, natural gas, etc. if the wind don't blow and it gets dark.

The mainstay power generation systems.

That is a fact that the left has never embraced.

They think that wind and solar outputs are the same and will remain the same, no matter what.

In the last cold snap here, it got to -25 below with little to no wind and it was cloudy the whole time.

Our windmills never turned at a time when energy was desperately needed.

Explain that AOC?

Regulating the power grid is quite an undertaking and cannot be done immediately.

It takes about 24 hours to change the output of a coal or nuke plant.

So if the wind goes down, WAPA, or your power distributor, needs to find power someplace.

So they have to over generate in case the wind goes down or a cloud comes over the solar.

This has turned electrical power into a giant crap shoot.

One cannot rely on clean energy because it is unreliable.

Take a few huge power plants off line and replace with wind and solar and watch what happens.

You will then have rolling blackouts for sure and at the most unoportune time.

Government needs to keep their green fingers out of this or we will be again, "DARK".

 

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1 hour ago, Diesel Doctor said:

First of all, one needs full power output available by coal, nuke, natural gas, etc. if the wind don't blow and it gets dark.

The mainstay power generation systems.

That is a fact that the left has never embraced.

 

I'm not going to disagree with anything you said.  But from what I hear and see from the latest TX debacle is that everything was going down on them when they needed it, not just the “green” stuff.  Depending on “green” was just part of the problem.  Had everything else been better prepared for the weather there would have been less disruption.  Apparently this is nothing new to TX, it sounds like they went through this twice before in the last couple decades.

I definitely do think that there is a great deal of ignorance, deliberately or otherwise, about the repercussions of depending on “green” energy, and also just how much the demand on the grid will increase with the influx of a large number of EVs.  My thought is that things are going to get real interesting in the next 20 years or so as this unfolds.  My personal goal is to reduce my dependence on grid electricity as much as possible.  I want it to be easy to run my farm place with a small generator. 

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