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AC 180 clutch and rearend


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I know it’s the wrong color but I know that there are experts on most tractors here.

I have a family member with a 180 that asked for some help with the clutch replacement and possibly rearend work.

The clutch is about nonexistent and needs replaced. It also jumps out of certain gears not sure which off hand.

1. Would a clutch kit from agkits (or similar supplier) contain all the needed parts and possible seals needed to replace the clutch?

2. Is there anything extra to replace or do when it is split for the clutch?

3. Has anyone worked on these rearends and are they easy reasonably priced to fix(there is a tight budget) and how hard or big of a job is it to fix?

The only time it is able to be worked on is during winter because it is his main tractor in the summer.

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This is the guy to talk to for a clutch for a pumpkin. https://www.allischalmers.com/forum/f-s-reman-clutch-units-brakes_topic174645.html?KW=clutch

Rick will do you right. If I don't like the look of things when I get the 756 split this spring he'll be the guy I talk to. Good prices and fantastic product.

The gear jumping is not a cheap fix. I'm no expert but probably going to have to replace some gears. They are available but not cheap.

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We did a clutch on a 190. Fairly straight forward and I don't recall there being anything unusual on it. We used the same stands we use for the IH's but there is all different bolt holes on them to work on anything. As far as new clutches we haven't bought one in years. Unless they're too far gone they get rebuilt. And if I remember right the one in this Allis was wore right off. Had to start it in gear. If you've done a clutch on other tractors it should be no problem. As far as the popping out of gear I don't know. 

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Like everyone said clutch is straight forward. The rear end shouldn't be to bad. Had one apart a few years ago for the over under shifting. If it's not staying in gear that should be some sort of detent issue in the shift linkage.

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Clutch is an easy job and can be done in a few hours if you have the parts on hand. As far as jumping out of gear, it’s usually third gear. Never have had that trouble ourselves but there are several in the neighborhood here that have. If it is a gear the whole rear ended needs to tore apart to remove the shafts and gears. I don’t believe the gears are that expensive for them just a pain to do with everything that needs to disassembled. They are the last thing out the first thing back in. Don’t hold me to it but I think the two gears for third gear are about $150 a piece. 

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The clutch is straight forward and as with any clutch job clutch/ppa bearings, rear engine seal and front input seals. All Allis tractors from the WD45 on are helical gear, collar shift transmissions. What happens is they get shifted on the go or a guy grinds them into gear and it destroys the teeth. Allis used narrow shift collars and after years of abuse the teeth get rounded off on both the collar and the gear and the force of the helical gear pushes the collar back into neutral. 

I just did a D17 series 4 for a guy last summer. It was popping out of 3rd and 4th which is the most common. Its a major tear down. You need to split it behind the torque tube. Pull off both axles and completely disassemble the transmission/differential housing. I would have to look back at his bill. But between parts and labor it was in that 4000.00-4500.00 range. That was 3rd and 4th gears. All the collars, bearings, Seals and stuff I am forgetting. His tractor had a new clutch put in it just a few years ago so I left that alone.

Use only Allis/AGCO gears as the A & I gears I have heard bad things about. I talked to a guy who said the A & I gears whined like a crying child when he was done. Maybe they have improved them. And forget used gears. They all have the same problem. It's to much work to skimp on that job unless its your own and don't mind taking a chance. And some guys I have read welded up and ground new teeth on the gear/collars. There again depends if you want to take a chance and have lots of spare time.

Put the transmission in 2nd gear and pull off the shifter cover. You can then inspect the collars, gears and forks. 

Mike

 

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