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Portable saw mills


Cattech
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18 hours ago, Dave Shepard said:

All timber frame parts. Hardest part is finding the logs.

Some 40' white oak and those 52' white pine sills going in.

 

 

IMG_20151104_114052378.jpg

I'm getting ready to start  a timber frame house, Long  logs is gettin to be a problem even here in Maine still a lot of big spruce up north and it's nice to work with

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I had another thought after my last post. Depending on alot of things like your own comfort level and learning curve and how long a wait for a new one. There's always building your own. You wouldn't be the first to do it

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3 minutes ago, 51cub said:

I had another thought after my last post. Depending on alot of things like your own comfort level and learning curve and how long a wait for a new one. There's always building your own. You wouldn't be the first to do it

There is a man in town here that built his own , used wood mizer design and changed a few things  it works fine 

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A lot of the old mills in New England use syp, big stuff. I resawed some bridge crane timbers that were 12x14x50'. I guess it was easier to ship it up here than to fell the Eastern White Pine that we had here that would also make big timbers.

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Guy I buy my rough cut is on his 3rd Woodmizer - kept upgrading as it's his living. I'm very happy with the quality/accuracy of his lumber.

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Not to be negative on any one brand but If I did it again I'd pick a Woodmiser or another brand. I have a Norwood LM-29 and have had nothing but issues with it.

They seem to be more concerned with selling you new add ons that actually solving an issue. Most all of them work on the same band saw principle and are set up similarly.

No where in the Instruction did they tell you how much tension the band need to be under, you had to search YouTube for info to find it. I'm not a novice to the setup of machinery having done a bunch of it for over 50 years. The thing was a pain to assemble, but you do get to know it.

I built a trailer for it then had to modify the trailer to get it low enough to work everything. I can now do 20ft lengths, but the issue comes with although the blade is same height above the rails all through the traveling distance it continually cuts an 1/4 to 1/2 inch more at the end than the beginning. No matter how fast or slow I go.

 The blades they supplied and sell are absolute junk. Supposedly able to cut for 2 hrs before changing blades. I went through 10 in under 4 hrs of cutting, and you could watch the blade dive into the wood and drop off the roller guides at times. Usually getting only 10-15 cuts per blade in pine & fir. Switched to a different brand and get at least 65-80 cuts per blade, but the uneven sawing remains with various tensions not making any difference. 

It's a ton of work but if you have the trees available it can save you a bunch of $$$. You pay one way or the other, time or money, or quite often, both.

Thats just my experience with the Norwood brand, good luck and chose wisely grasshoppah.

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Not to be negative on any one brand but If I did it again I'd pick a Woodmiser or another brand. I have a Norwood LM-29 and have had nothing but issues with it.

They seem to be more concerned with selling you new add ons that actually solving an issue. Most all of them work on the same band saw principle and are set up similarly.

No where in the Instruction did they tell you how much tension the band need to be under, you had to search YouTube for info to find it. I'm not a novice to the setup of machinery having done a bunch of it for over 50 years. The thing was a pain to assemble, but you do get to know it.

I built a trailer for it then had to modify the trailer to get it low enough to work everything. I can now do 20ft lengths, but the issue comes with although the blade is same height above the rails all through the traveling distance it continually cuts an 1/4 to 1/2 inch more at the end than the beginning. No matter how fast or slow I go.

 The blades they supplied and sell are absolute junk. Supposedly able to cut for 2 hrs before changing blades. I went through 10 in under 4 hrs of cutting, and you could watch the blade dive into the wood and drop off the roller guides at times. Usually getting only 10-15 cuts per blade in pine & fir. Switched to a different brand and get at least 65-80 cuts per blade, but the uneven sawing remains with various tensions not making any difference. 

It's a ton of work but if you have the trees available it can save you a bunch of $$$. You pay one way or the other, time or money, or quite often, both.

Thats just my experience with the Norwood brand, good luck and chose wisely grasshoppah.

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Not to be negative on any one brand but If I did it again I'd pick a Woodmiser or another brand. I have a Norwood LM-29 and have had nothing but issues with it.

They seem to be more concerned with selling you new add ons that actually solving an issue. Most all of them work on the same band saw principle and are set up similarly.

No where in the Instruction did they tell you how much tension the band need to be under, you had to search YouTube for info to find it. I'm not a novice to the setup of machinery having done a bunch of it for over 50 years. The thing was a pain to assemble, but you do get to know it.

I built a trailer for it then had to modify the trailer to get it low enough to work everything. I can now do 20ft lengths, but the issue comes with although the blade is same height above the rails all through the traveling distance it continually cuts an 1/4 to 1/2 inch more at the end than the beginning. No matter how fast or slow I go.

 The blades they supplied and sell are absolute junk. Supposedly able to cut for 2 hrs before changing blades. I went through 10 in under 4 hrs of cutting, and you could watch the blade dive into the wood and drop off the roller guides at times. Usually getting only 10-15 cuts per blade in pine & fir. Switched to a different brand and get at least 65-80 cuts per blade, but the uneven sawing remains with various tensions not making any difference. 

It's a ton of work but if you have the trees available it can save you a bunch of $$$. You pay one way or the other, time or money, or quite often, both.

Thats just my experience with the Norwood brand, good luck and chose wisely grasshoppah.

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Not to be negative on any one brand but If I did it again I'd pick a Woodmiser or another brand. I have a Norwood LM-29 and have had nothing but issues with it.

They seem to be more concerned with selling you new add ons that actually solving an issue. Most all of them work on the same band saw principle and are set up similarly.

No where in the Instruction did they tell you how much tension the band need to be under, you had to search YouTube for info to find it. I'm not a novice to the setup of machinery having done a bunch of it for over 50 years. The thing was a pain to assemble, but you do get to know it.

I built a trailer for it then had to modify the trailer to get it low enough to work everything. I can now do 20ft lengths, but the issue comes with although the blade is same height above the rails all through the traveling distance it continually cuts an 1/4 to 1/2 inch more at the end than the beginning. No matter how fast or slow I go.

 The blades they supplied and sell are absolute junk. Supposedly able to cut for 2 hrs before changing blades. I went through 10 in under 4 hrs of cutting, and you could watch the blade dive into the wood and drop off the roller guides at times. Usually getting only 10-15 cuts per blade in pine & fir. Switched to a different brand and get at least 65-80 cuts per blade, but the uneven sawing remains with various tensions not making any difference. 

It's a ton of work but if you have the trees available it can save you a bunch of $$$. You pay one way or the other, time or money, or quite often, both.

Thats just my experience with the Norwood brand, good luck and chose wisely grasshoppah.

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Not to be negative on any one brand but If I did it again I'd pick a Woodmiser or another brand. I have a Norwood LM-29 and have had nothing but issues with it.

They seem to be more concerned with selling you new add ons that actually solving an issue. Most all of them work on the same band saw principle and are set up similarly.

No where in the Instruction did they tell you how much tension the band need to be under, you had to search YouTube for info to find it. I'm not a novice to the setup of machinery having done a bunch of it for over 50 years. The thing was a pain to assemble, but you do get to know it.

I built a trailer for it then had to modify the trailer to get it low enough to work everything. I can now do 20ft lengths, but the issue comes with although the blade is same height above the rails all through the traveling distance it continually cuts an 1/4 to 1/2 inch more at the end than the beginning. No matter how fast or slow I go.

 The blades they supplied and sell are absolute junk. Supposedly able to cut for 2 hrs before changing blades. I went through 10 in under 4 hrs of cutting, and you could watch the blade dive into the wood and drop off the roller guides at times. Usually getting only 10-15 cuts per blade in pine & fir. Switched to a different brand and get at least 65-80 cuts per blade, but the uneven sawing remains with various tensions not making any difference. 

It's a ton of work but if you have the trees available it can save you a bunch of $$$. You pay one way or the other, time or money, or quite often, both.

Thats just my experience with the Norwood brand, good luck and chose wisely grasshoppah.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/9/2021 at 12:24 AM, Cattech said:

Anybody have a Hud-son? Look pretty good for the money.

I am looking at an Oscar 428 model Hudson. I can make track to cut long beams easily enough and it looks economical enough compared to the current lumber prices

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I really think there are a ton of factors, I have a new HM126 Woodland mill it is my second mill and I love it very accurate and well built. But...I saw for fun and have all kinds of equipment to move logs.  I have sawed a few 20"+ x 14' oaks on mine and its just not a one man job with the manual mill.. Shorter pine and what not is a breeze but a few logs a day is all a guy wants. 

 If I was going to saw much more than the 40-50 logs I do a year I would spend the extra on a hydraulic mill. And probably a woodmiser, I have been around a few of them and they are great machines, for the money the woodland is a great entry level mill and when your ready to upgrade it will sell like nothing.

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  • 1 month later...

I sawed a 16' in 5"x6/4 last night. First log since setting up on the Frehauf trailer 

IMG_20210413_190955640_HDR.jpg

IMG_20210411_191932144.jpg

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