Jump to content

What might have been... Speaking of MFWA


Recommended Posts

When I was a kid in the mid-80s, we had a series of wet falls and no MFWA tractor, so corn chopping was loads of laughs. Picture a 10-11 year old kid with zero pulling experience on a 756 gas on 34" rubber trying to charge through the mud hole AND keep the chain tight before your dad runs you over with the 1066, because if he stops, everything's buried. There was no waiting for the rain to stop, because it never stopped those years. After that we put in about 50 miles of drainage tile over the next several years so even in a wet fall we can just avoid the few wet spots left.

At one point, Dad found and purchased an Elwood axle to put on the 1066, but it was the wrong one for the tractor somehow. In order to make it work, it would have needed 18.4x28 tires on the front. He ended up returning it and chopping with two tractors that year.

Fast forward, and I saw this in the most recent edition of RPM. This thing looks crazy:

image.thumb.png.c2f57bf70d9260b6119714884b50a2a6.png

I always wondered what Dad's 1066 would have looked like with the Elwood... Just picture this as a black stripe with a Hiniker cab. The fronts here are 460/85R30's, which is a 16.9R30 and pretty much comparable to the 18.4x28s.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Matt Kirsch changed the title to What might have been... Speaking of MFWA

I know nothing about these older FWA's but i can't imagine that you would be able to turn those front tires more than a few degrees without rubbing on the frame rails. It does have a cool factor ,for sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure is funny how that 1066 pictured has bounced around from dealer lot to dealer lot, and gone up in price along the way, and then to Mecum’s! The first dealer tried $25,000 for a year or better, the 2nd dealer tried $30k for 3 months, and dealer 3 painted it, with “fully restored” and $57k! Wonder what it brought at the auction?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Farmall1066 said:

Sure is funny how that 1066 pictured has bounced around from dealer lot to dealer lot, and gone up in price along the way, and then to Mecum’s! The first dealer tried $25,000 for a year or better, the 2nd dealer tried $30k for 3 months, and dealer 3 painted it, with “fully restored” and $57k! Wonder what it brought at the auction?

It brought $43,050, but I don't know if that's before or after the buyer's premium was applied. They add the premium to the final sale price now to further inflate prices.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

When I was a kid in the mid-80s, we had a series of wet falls and no MFWA tractor, so corn chopping was loads of laughs. Picture a 10-11 year old kid with zero pulling experience on a 756 gas on 34" rubber trying to charge through the mud hole AND keep the chain tight before your dad runs you over with the 1066, because if he stops, everything's buried. There was no waiting for the rain to stop, because it never stopped those years. After that we put in about 50 miles of drainage tile over the next several years so even in a wet fall we can just avoid the few wet spots left.

At one point, Dad found and purchased an Elwood axle to put on the 1066, but it was the wrong one for the tractor somehow. In order to make it work, it would have needed 18.4x28 tires on the front. He ended up returning it and chopping with two tractors that year.

Fast forward, and I saw this in the most recent edition of RPM. This thing looks crazy:

image.thumb.png.c2f57bf70d9260b6119714884b50a2a6.png

I always wondered what Dad's 1066 would have looked like with the Elwood... Just picture this as a black stripe with a Hiniker cab. The fronts here are 460/85R30's, which is a 16.9R30 and pretty much comparable to the 18.4x28s.

     Spring of 1979 Our 3588 was delivered to our Dairy Farm,  Our 2+2 Chopped a lot of the Neighbors Corn Fields that wet Fall of '79.

Pulled a New Gehl 1200 3 row Chopper,   Filled the wagons about 2/3rds full ,  Fella's struggled to get the wagons moved from the Head lands, to the Silo's

A 2+2 would Drag a Chopper & Wagon through a Rain saturated field,  The Ruts & soil compaction lasted for 4 years!!

Interesting Tractors.

Jim Droscha

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it would be a long way off in its 'interaxle ratio as pictured there.

I would like to hear the tooth count on the transfer case gear in that one,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, DroschaFamilyDairy said:

     Spring of 1979 Our 3588 was delivered to our Dairy Farm,  Our 2+2 Chopped a lot of the Neighbors Corn Fields that wet Fall of '79.

Pulled a New Gehl 1200 3 row Chopper,   Filled the wagons about 2/3rds full ,  Fella's struggled to get the wagons moved from the Head lands, to the Silo's

A 2+2 would Drag a Chopper & Wagon through a Rain saturated field,  The Ruts & soil compaction lasted for 4 years!!

Interesting Tractors.

Jim Droscha

Interesting, i wasn't aware that 79 was a wet fall from the tales Dad talks about.  He mentioned a bad chopping season in 1986 and then the granddaddy of $--- falls from what ive been told from multiple sources.  The fall of 1972.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After acquiring one for my 1566. They are definitely cool, but the cost to maintain & repair because of parts availability. Make them obsolete as far as I’m concerned. Great for show tractors tho.

19A211AF-604C-4E7A-8751-14F9C9E6FC7F.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Reichow7120 said:

Interesting, i wasn't aware that 79 was a wet fall from the tales Dad talks about.  He mentioned a bad chopping season in 1986 and then the granddaddy of $--- falls from what ive been told from multiple sources.  The fall of 1972.

 

   Yup, A Big Deal In Eaton County, 1977-1983, We are in the center of the State of Michigan,   Our Water either goes to the Grand River or The Thornapple river.

Two of Our Farms are the Head Water for the Little Thornapple River, which wanders through 3 Lakes,   Heads north through Potterville, Mi, to become the Thornapple River.

The Drain commission had started a County Drain Cleaning Program in 1978,  working about 3 miles down stream from our property,  Clearing the ditch banks cutting trees, Installing new "RoadCrossing Bridges".

  We Had a tremendous Rain in the First part of August 1979,  The Low Ground where the Excavating equipment were working was caught by surprise as the Creeks And Flood plains began to fill with water,  The Tree's and Limbs that had been Piled on each side of the Shallow Banks of the River began to Wash into the river, This floating mess caught down stream,  on the Newly installed road crossing and created an instant Dam,

Within 3 Hours of constant Downpour those Dozers & Excavators were under water.

By the Next Morning All the Tributaries contributing to the Little Thornaple River were above there Banks,  Muck Fields for Miles around became Lakes.

Water almost up to the top of the Corn stalks,  County Roads were closed for Miles in each direction.

***That water wasn't going to stop us Boy's!!,***  We pilled onto the Open station 826 and headed for the County roads!!,    about 2 miles away from the Farm and Within 15 minutes we were Boating on the Back roads,   4th High in standing water takes a lot of Horsepower & Speed, The Wake was fun to watch, we traveled along till we came to an area that didn't look familiar,   The Big Dozers on the Construction crew Cleared this Little narrow road.

Standing Water at the road culverts was above the front Axel,  You could see a Mail box sticking above the surface of the water way down the road, on that back road,  but Nothing else,  Tall Green Corn stalks were about 200 feet away from the center of the road on each side we calculated.

We also knew that there were Ditches on both sides of the road, and the road had curves, and our Land marks of trees had been removed for the Drain Cleaning Project!!

There was 5 of us on that tractor,  suddenly 2nd Low was Too Fast to go down that little narrow road through the Mammoth Lake,   That was a feeling of "Where Are We"?   The "only" sound you could hear was that water swishing around our tractor and the Diesel engine,  Everyone was white Knuckled to a Fender edge or Seat Bracket or Steering Wheel............. Well,... We backed out of the Water till we found the Corner cross roads,   Backed almost a 1/4 mile.

 Not a Word was said to me as I "backed" that 826 towards the stop signs......I Know our Pants were wet from the "Splashing" of the rear tires at road speed,....   But when the "Water was over the Road", was that Deep,...........Well.......... I know there was several little guy's on that tractor fender that wet there Pant's!!   Maybe all of US!!!

   The New road Culvert that had been installed the 2 weeks before the Downpour collapsed, Tree's & Debris went down stream, The Corn Fields slowly Drained.

   Fall chopping Didn't start Till Mid October in our Dairy Community, still had Fall rains in October that didn't Help the low ground.

Spring of 2019, Eaton County Drain Commission started the Drain cleaning Project on the Little Thornapple River again!!  No Problems this Major Problems this Time. 

Jim Droscha

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, from H to 80 said:

I know nothing about these older FWA's but i can't imagine that you would be able to turn those front tires more than a few degrees without rubbing on the frame rails. It does have a cool factor ,for sure.

I think those front ends can't turn very much to start with. I am not sure if the tires would rub before the mechanical limit is exceeded 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My old neighbors in western New York run a 100 cow dairy and still use elwoods full time...two 1066mfd...and my old 1586mfd that I sold them when I moved to Florida. The man that bought my 1586 new also had a 1566mfd and a 1086mfd. He pulled a 3row 1250 gehl with the 1586. When it got muddy he would hook the 10 and the other 15 up to the front, had a special hitch on the front that ran a cable down to the drawer so as not to pull on the frontend.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Ed Leaman said:

I think it would be a long way off in its 'interaxle ratio as pictured there.

I would like to hear the tooth count on the transfer case gear in that one,

Hmm, I was hoping you might know what the difference was, because I know there are at least two of them like this out in the wild. That front end we had didn't travel far. It ended up on an 86 series.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Haywire said:

We have a few. Good units if not abused 

E6820EDD-08D8-455D-B91D-D8310C75C8BD.jpeg

Welcome,  Nice Picture,  Excellent example of front wheel assist Tractors.  I would sure enjoy a Story about every tractor in your Picture, 

What Part of The USA is your farm located in?      Pretty Country in the Back ground.

Thanks, Jim Droscha

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/1/2021 at 6:40 AM, Matt Kirsch said:

When I was a kid in the mid-80s, we had a series of wet falls and no MFWA tractor, so corn chopping was loads of laughs. Picture a 10-11 year old kid with zero pulling experience on a 756 gas on 34" rubber trying to charge through the mud hole AND keep the chain tight before your dad runs you over with the 1066, because if he stops, everything's buried. There was no waiting for the rain to stop, because it never stopped those years. After that we put in about 50 miles of drainage tile over the next several years so even in a wet fall we can just avoid the few wet spots left.

You reminded me of a childhood memory I'd just as soon forget.   Dad picked some ear corn with an old Oliver single row picker and a wagon obviously behind it.  One year it got late in the year, I am thinking it was probably November by the time we got around to picking it,  ground was wet and soft, and yeah that story about keeping the chain tight yep! :)

Somewhere in that the pin slipped out of the drawbar that held the draw bar to the tractor so it appeared the picker was still hooked up so a quick tug with the front tractor quickly had an unhooked picker and only the half shaft of the pto still hooked up and turning.  Probably was a good thing it was only 540 :)

 

I'll never forget the struggle of that fall and how much effort it was.  Looking back we would of been better off to get all the neighbor kids and just hand pick it.   I also appreciate the FWA tractors I now have as that would of been a dream come true as a kid growing up! 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/3/2021 at 8:14 AM, Haywire said:

Mohawk Valley in NY. Adirondack foothills in the background 

Not TOO terribly far from me. Pretty landscape there!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had a year between about 92 and 96 where the summer and fall were very wet.  It was before my dad had bought our current 766 and that came in 97.  We were picking corn at the time yet and we had a 327 NI 2 row we pulled with our M.  Even with new 14.9 tires on it at the time the M just could not pull that picker and the 150 bushel gravity wagons we have thru that muck by itself.  I spent my time keeping the chain tight on the front with our 43 H providing just enough tug to get us thru.  There were times it was a struggle for both and there may have been one or two times that there were backups and some jerks of he chain.  A yank em rope would have been awesome back then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Ihcubguy said:

We had a year between about 92 and 96 where the summer and fall were very wet.  It was before my dad had bought our current 766 and that came in 97.  We were picking corn at the time yet and we had a 327 NI 2 row we pulled with our M.  Even with new 14.9 tires on it at the time the M just could not pull that picker and the 150 bushel gravity wagons we have thru that muck by itself.  I spent my time keeping the chain tight on the front with our 43 H providing just enough tug to get us thru.  There were times it was a struggle for both and there may have been one or two times that there were backups and some jerks of he chain.  A yank em rope would have been awesome back then.

I realize that we're from different states but if i had a guess. It sounds like you are describing 1992. I was young then but i remember the **** my Dad and Grandpa went through to get that harvest out. Corn never fully matured so it was wet a crap test weight. Like 28 to 32% moisture wet. Summer was cool with no growing degree days and then it frosted early and that ended any further maturing of the corn. It rained and snowed all fall. I remember riding with Dad in the 1620 we had down on my Uncle's farm. Just before Christmas. We didn't work the amount of ground we do now to be that late. Before the field was done it was snowing like crazy but Dad was determined he was finishing up. He had totally had it with that fall by that point. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...