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Electricians Wago connectors


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A colleague asked me about these and I've never heard of them. They seem to be German.

I couldn't capture an image, hotel internet is like dial-up.

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I've seen them used at work before. I don't delve into the electrical side much. Most of our connections are terminated in a cabinet but I have seen them. Seem to work ok. All our stuff is installed inside. Dont know how they work exposed to the elements. 

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I HIGHLY advise against their use, they have their place in small runs of low wattage lighting, aside from

that they do not create a sufficiently tight or electrically sound connection to carry any substantial load, IMO they are a fire or failure waiting to happen. 

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I found some of those in my outdoor boiler. About made me boil trying to take them apart to diagnose a problem. I'm sure they are fast at the factory, but I'll stick to wire nuts.

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We have a newer building at work that has almost all connections made with them. I don't like them when you find yourself doing hot work such as replacing a ballast or driver on a normal emergency circuit. I would much prefer wire nuts. But then I am kinda old school. I do like the luminaire disconnects however as they allow you to easily disconnect power so you don't have to work hot in the first place. Most of our lighting is 277V

 

WAGO 773 WALL-NUTS 300pc Push Wire Connector Assortment Pack          

Wago 873-902 LUMI-NUTS? PUSH WIRE? Connector for Luminaire Disconnect 500 PK

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The job of a connector is to provide a secure mechanical connection, one that holds regardless of reasonable strain put on it. A properly installed twist on wirenut, has 2 full twists of wire outside the connector, so the strain is not on the actual connection, it also has properly stripped and properly aligned wire inside it, the correct length wire, and the correct size connector. Those ice cube or wago or as they are locally known “Hans” connectors, rely on a tiny bit of spring steel making a narrow point of contact, this connection is prone to heating with applied load because it isnt a great connection to begin with and when it does it weakens the spring that is holding it leading to failure, if you are lucky it fails internally and you need to find and repair, if you aren’t .. well.. Ideal had to recall a chitload of those a few years back due to failure. The same applies to these back stabbed outlets and switches that are so common, strip the wire and wrap it clockwise around the screw, tighten to rated torque. Unless they are used as listed for some very very light load, like a few LED lights. 

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I never heard of them until last week when I saw a video on YouTube touting their superiority to twist on wire nuts. They kind of sound like the 3m scotch lock connectors of home wiring.

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57 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

I HIGHLY advise against their use, they have their place in small runs of low wattage lighting, aside from

that they do not create a sufficiently tight or electrically sound connection to carry any substantial load, IMO they are a fire or failure waiting to happen. 

Should be outlawed. Bags slit for creating such a travesty 

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vtfireman is right on the money. as a retired electrican with over 35 years i would never back stab a switch or outlet i have repaired more than my fair share that were back stabbed.  wire melted back from outlets 2-3 inchs

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47 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

The same applies to these back stabbed outlets and switches that are so common, strip the wire and wrap it clockwise around the screw,

Are the rear entry outlets where they are screw tightened from the side fine? Asking because my house is full of those. Our converted garage to bedroom had those push in type that I cut out and discarded

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20 minutes ago, junkandcattle said:

Are the rear entry outlets where they are screw tightened from the side fine? Asking because my house is full of those. Our converted garage to bedroom had those push in type that I cut out and discarded

I am not a huge fan of the newer leviton GFCI outlets with a tin clamp, but in general a screw clamp is perfectly fine. 

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1 hour ago, TractormanMike.mb said:

I never heard of them until last week when I saw a video on YouTube touting their superiority to twist on wire nuts. They kind of sound like the 3m scotch lock connectors of home wiring.

They are the shark bites of the electricians world.

they are there, and you’ll use them one day, but you’ll try everything else first

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You guys are sorely mistaken about the WAGO connectors. I have used them for over 20 years and have yet to see one fail. I’m not talking about the cheap imitations or the back stabbed outlets. The WAGO brand connectors are rated at 30amp 600volt IIRC. They will easily handle more amperage. Before we started using them we put some samples through a torture test. Damn near melted the wire with no problem at the connector. Like anything they have their place. For me that is any connection for more than 3 solid wires. Trying to twist 4,5,6 or more solid #12 wires together and then cap them off with a wirenut is madness.  Where they really shine is adding or removing a single wire from such a connection. Easy. 
Try them. You will be impressed. 

The WAGO lever nuts are also awesome to use and work with stranded wire. 

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11 hours ago, TomH said:

We have a newer building at work that has almost all connections made with them. I don't like them when you find yourself doing hot work such as replacing a ballast or driver on a normal emergency circuit. I would much prefer wire nuts. But then I am kinda old school. I do like the luminaire disconnects however as they allow you to easily disconnect power so you don't have to work hot in the first place. Most of our lighting is 277V

 

WAGO 773 WALL-NUTS 300pc Push Wire Connector Assortment Pack          

Wago 873-902 LUMI-NUTS? PUSH WIRE? Connector for Luminaire Disconnect 500 PK

There’s no way I would get on a step ladder and work 277 hot . Basically one leg of 460.   When I find those type connectors I cut em off and use wire nuts. 

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5 minutes ago, lorenzo said:

There’s no way I would get on a step ladder and work 277 hot . Basically one leg of 460.   When I find those type connectors I cut em off and use wire nuts. 

the disconnects are required by law, it is known as the janitors clause, properly installed they carry the load of one ballast and really aren't an issue, pretty handy actually, I disagree with 12Guy, you will never find a wago or similar connector on my truck. 

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7 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

the disconnects are required by law, it is known as the janitors clause, properly installed they carry the load of one ballast and really aren't an issue, pretty handy actually, I disagree with 12Guy, you will never find a wago or similar connector on my truck. 

Yes but I can show you plenty of situations around here where they expect you to do it hot .

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Wow! Thanks guys, I'd never heard of them so apparently I've been living in the dark (pun intended).

I think my friend who mentioned the Wago may have seen them at his mother's house in Denmark, somehow I got that impression. Do they use wire nuts in Europe?

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1 hour ago, vtfireman85 said:

the disconnects are required by law, it is known as the janitors clause, properly installed they carry the load of one ballast and really aren't an issue, pretty handy actually, I disagree with 12Guy, you will never find a wago or similar connector on my truck. 

The Wago brand fixture disconnects have 4 terminals on the line side. Two each line and neutral. They allow you to daisy chain the entire circuit. The load going through the first one would be the entire circuit not just a single driver or ballast. Unless of course you are foolish enough and wirenut a pigtail into the circuit conductors and then attach the pigtail to the Wago. 

I'm not trying to argue that your twisted and capped connection is not superior. That is debatable. I've seen plenty of twisted connections fail. Either the electrician twisted the wire till it nearly broke only to fail later or one conductor slipped back and was barely caught by the nut. 

As far as similar connectors go, I am not very impressed. Some may be ok. Wagos are great. They are very high quality. The International Harvester of the wire connector world. They are reusable and you can remove a wire easily and reinsert it. Quite simply they save time and time is money. But unlike most time savers they are not a poor quality compromise. I would not use them if they were. I do have standards and my reputation in the area. 

You should give them a test drive. You may be surprised. Every once in a while it does us good to step out of our comfort zone and move into the next century. 

Like I said before I have been using them for at least 20 years and have never seen a failure out of thousands installed. Understand that I am only talking about Wago connectors not cheap knock offs. 

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13 hours ago, Missouri Mule said:

?  Those are one of my biggest pet peeve's.   NO. Just NO

You don't like the Screw Type Terminal Blocks 

 

They are old school  

 

As with any bar type distribution they need to be mounted in an enclosure 

 

Almost all industrial cabinets now use the DIN rail mounted  Screw Type Terminal Blocks, breakers power supplies, etc. 

 

image.png.7f86be0f79d97a005c8f5a2b7377f789.png

 

 

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This is one of my control cabinets I designed for a project going on right now.  Been doing this for over 23 years. All Wago terminal blocks mounted on DIN rail. These are the screwless type. 

BB380A05-0453-4198-93C3-BD1F640B7433.jpeg

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4 minutes ago, Sresites said:

This is one of my control cabinets I designed for a project going on right now.  Been doing this for over 23 years. All Wago terminal blocks mounted on DIN rail. These are the screwless type. 

BB380A05-0453-4198-93C3-BD1F640B7433.jpeg

That is nice looking work

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1 hour ago, 12_Guy said:

The Wago brand fixture disconnects have 4 terminals on the line side. Two each line and neutral. They allow you to daisy chain the entire circuit. The load going through the first one would be the entire circuit not just a single driver or ballast. Unless of course you are foolish enough and wirenut a pigtail into the circuit conductors and then attach the pigtail to the Wago. 

I'm not trying to argue that your twisted and capped connection is not superior. That is debatable. I've seen plenty of twisted connections fail. Either the electrician twisted the wire till it nearly broke only to fail later or one conductor slipped back and was barely caught by the nut. 

As far as similar connectors go, I am not very impressed. Some may be ok. Wagos are great. They are very high quality. The International Harvester of the wire connector world. They are reusable and you can remove a wire easily and reinsert it. Quite simply they save time and time is money. But unlike most time savers they are not a poor quality compromise. I would not use them if they were. I do have standards and my reputation in the area. 

You should give them a test drive. You may be surprised. Every once in a while it does us good to step out of our comfort zone and move into the next century. 

Like I said before I have been using them for at least 20 years and have never seen a failure out of thousands installed. Understand that I am only talking about Wago connectors not cheap knock offs. 

I honestly have never seen a Wago brand connector for sale here, maybe the next order i make to Grainger I will get a few to inspect, unless they are WILDLY more impressive than the Ideal brand i have seen i don’t think i will be impressed, but i will look them over. As to failed wire-nut connections, i too have seen many fail however i have NEVER seen one fail that was properly installed.  My personal favorite connector is an ideal 30- series bras set screw, but at over 1.00 each they are not economical to use for general purposes. We carry 30-222,30-211 and 30-210, they come in very handy and solve some problems at times justifying their cost. 

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