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McCormick F-90A Baler


IHRedRyan
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This little Baler is advertised in the 1960 Farmer's Catalogue. Marketed to the "Small Acreage Farmer" but i'm surprised to see it behind something as small as a Super A (i also find it interesting that it's pictured behind a Super A as late as 1960 and not a 140). Does anybody have any info on these little guys? I can only find one picture online and no information anywhere. 

F-90A Baler.jpg

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Wow, awesome photos, thanks!

Makes more sense why it was behind such a small tractor now with its own engine. Couldn't see that in the photo i had. It's a Canadian catalogue it was advertised in so i guess they must have imported some here. 

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5 hours ago, IHRedRyan said:

Makes more sense why it was behind such a small tractor now with its own engine. Couldn't see that in the photo i had.

The one in your picture is being run off the PTO shaft.  The baler in your pic has no engine. 

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Oh ya it's the same side isn't it. I should have looked a little closer. Thanks

Would be a nice little baler to have some fun with - not going to keep my hopes up on finding one though. 

 

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SO, could you give a little description of how this baler even works?   Obviously no big flywheel & plunger to pack the hay into a tension chamber like typical balers, and it says "low density" bales - 36 x 11 x 24 at 44 lbs would be 30-50% of a normal "small square".     So I'm curious how the bales are formed, what "packs" them, etc.

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this text had been initially  written for Howard Pletcher : The low-density baler is typically an European implement, Main brands produced in Germany, France,and sometimes Italy.the goal was to meet the needs of small farms, particularly in the mountainous regions.The bales were fragile, to handle with precaution, in order to avoid the accidental loose of the twine.CIMA developped three models, well built,specially with an auxiliary engine, allowing the machine to be pulled with two horses.However these type of machines had their market share decreasing quickly after 1960 : in our region, despite the mountainous Character, my father sold a lot of 45,F45,B46, F5-46,B 47,and BL30 Bamfords,( a GB brand),and that type of machine  (36x46 bale dimension) medium-density became the standard,the low-density builders went out the business after 1970, except for those building other type of hay balers.The three machines made in Croix factory (north of France) we the F 90, F91, and F5-112 -equipped with Mac Cormick knotters,during the period 1995-1970.the Main competitors were Claas, Rousseau (purchased by JD later) Rivierre-Casalis, and a bunch of small brands like Heywang, Goetzmann, Rochland (purchased by Hesston) Garnier

I have purchased a F91 sold by my dealership in 1964 in a nice shape-a friend of mine works with a F 90 Bernard engine PTO, originally pulled by a FC Farmall.A 2nd advantage was that the hay wasn’t cut, but gently baled – there were remaining prevention about the quality of the hay cut by a middle-density baler during a long time – The last attempt was done by the French engineering in Croix factory with a middle-density baler without knives , models 410 & 412.that last machine enver entered in regular production, my father was asked about this project , answering that the goal was to sell reliable binders (knotters) in lieu of declining a new concept without any market  - I shall tell you a day our IH balers adventures : i own the complete fold of the developpment of the all-twine tyers, by a French IH dealer Henri Favier.

 

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