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@m.c.farmerboy  I am wondering why the center of the bucket is bent up, rather than down.  The greatest forces on the bucket are as it is curled which would bent the edge down.  Was the new operator breaking rocks or concrete?  Brian

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14 hours ago, lightninboy said:

Can weld a cutting edge onto a farm loader bucket without preheating, though, right? 

We have always got away with no pre heat on our ag buckets. 3/4x6" cutting edges and 1/2" is the thickest of what any of these attached to on ours 

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They were tearing a building down machine had a thumb and they were busting up large timbers any thing is possible at that point.

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10 hours ago, AKwelder said:

Yes, at least I was. Work in the office more now a days 

nice and warm in an office in winter and No bugs in warm weather

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12 hours ago, AKwelder said:

Yes, at least I was. Work in the office more now a days 

Good for you

It will be all maintenance in the future not going to be any new fossil fuel pipelines. 

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30 minutes ago, jeeper61 said:

Good for you

It will be all maintenance in the future not going to be any new fossil fuel pipelines. 

Lol.  Ok. Here’s some maintenance welding from work

9A4BD62F-C856-4870-9DD4-DFEEB13B90D7.thumb.jpeg.aca00af83d59c64547d181babf06fcd5.jpeg

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38 minutes ago, jeeper61 said:

Please describe the detail of the work 

working under cover, with heat?  you guys got it made!

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1 hour ago, m.c.farmerboy said:

working under cover, with heat?  you guys got it made!

Heat from the welding is the worst in the hot summer

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4 minutes ago, bitty said:

Heat from the welding is the worst in the hot summer

even worse when it's per heated to 400F  and 90 in the shade 

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On 1/21/2021 at 8:55 AM, 1586 Jeff said:

Bolted on cutting edges are easier to change.

 

On 1/21/2021 at 9:04 AM, m.c.farmerboy said:

 

On bigger machines and wheel loaders have bolt on wear parts making for quick change outs, machines working 24/7 wear out a lot of iron

Thanks,men. That's about what I figured but wanted to be sure. The only things I ever got to see changed were a loader and an excavator bucket. The loader of course the cutting edge was bolted on, bolts were cut off and replaced when the edge got changed. It wasn't always 24-7, but sure could be during the winter loading salt sand, and summers were long days with drainage material

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11 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

Please describe the detail of the work 

We get special fittings that are split in half, we fit them around a live line, weld them together, then to the pipeline. They can then mount a valve on the new branch, and a tapping machine outboard of the valve (it’s a huge hole saw). Open the valve and tap the line, retract the saw and close the valve and you have a new branch. 
 

they also have plugs that go in the branch called stoppel’s. Allows them to stop flow for maintenance 

 

google TD Williams stopple.  
 

 

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10 hours ago, m.c.farmerboy said:

working under cover, with heat?  you guys got it made!

Wish it was for the guys, it’s not.  They don’t want the weld to be in the elements

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On 1/21/2021 at 8:17 AM, 51cub said:

Here's a chance for me to learn something. Where I used to work they always welded the wear plates on, then some beads of hard face. I have a couple ideas but don't know if I'm right. So my question is, why do you bolt them on?

Yes, the other guys are correct, they wear quick and are easier to change. A 994 is the largest loader Cat makes so everything is big, and this one worked in what used to be, and maybe still is, the world's largest limestone mine. It would grate the wear plates off very frequently, and they were changed before they would let the wear get into the actual cutting edge. The weld in edge I replaced was a spade nose edge, and that's what I replaced it with. The wear plates went in between the bucket teeth, of which I also had to weld the shanks onto the bucket for the teeth to fit on to. The wear plates weighed a couple hundred pounds each, and bolted to the underside of the bucket, then had a lip where it sort of fit over the front of the cutting edge and actually stuck up higher than the cutting edge so that the wear plates would catch the most wear, not the cutting edge or bucket itself. Pretty much the entire face of the bucket was lined with wear parts, which were manganese, and had to be  changed fairly often, so it was much easier to unbolt them. The picture here is of a much smaller loader, not the 994 I worked on, but it is set up the same.

finning-hanson-cat-986k-wl.png

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