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The Randy Sohn memorial airplane thread


Steve C.
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Not unlike the unauthorized demo of the Boeing 707 prototype the same year.  I wonder which one happened first?

And I suspect Randy did do something similar, although not in a Vulcan.

 

 

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37 minutes ago, mikem said:

I got yhis link in an email today...

Enjoy

Mike

What a ride.

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It would have been interesting IF the narrator had said where he ejected, and how he was found. (Did he manage to walk to a house, or did the Air Force expand the search area to locate him)

PURE GD SLOPPINESS.

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28 minutes ago, Art From Coleman said:

It would have been interesting IF the narrator had said where he ejected, and how he was found. (Did he manage to walk to a house, or did the Air Force expand the search area to locate him)

PURE GD SLOPPINESS.

Google him Art, you will find it all there....!!

<Mike

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On 7/30/2022 at 11:25 AM, Howard_P said:

Not unlike the unauthorized demo of the Boeing 707 prototype the same year.  I wonder which one happened first?

And I suspect Randy did do something similar, although not in a Vulcan.

 

 

Howard

Seems the 707 was August and Farnborough was early September.

But doesn't seem that the 707 was at low level in front of a major air show,

But Roly Falk could claim "tradition" as Alex Henshaw (chief test pilot for the Castle Bromwich plant that made Spitfires and Lancasters had shown that you could do such in a Lancaster in demonstration).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alex_Henshaw

(And peripheral to this mentions there that the estimate is that Alex flew about 10% of the entire Spitfire family of 20,000 or so planes)

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Back in the 1980s, I once saw an Avro Vulcan perform a flying demonstration at an airshow in Canada. They didn’t do a barrel roll with it, but it was a very impressive sight and very loud. A B-52G also flew a flight demo, but was no where near as loud as that Vulcan. 

They also had a Vulcan on static display on the ground that you could look at. 


 

 

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2 hours ago, Rick G. said:

They also had a Vulcan on static display on the ground that you could look at. 

When the SAC Museum was at Bellevue, NE, they had a Vulcan on static display.

I do not know if that aircraft is on display at the SAC museum after it was moved to Ashland.

I have always had hopes of the museum acquiring one of the Atlas F sites that were part of Lincoln AFB, and one of the Atlas D/E sites that were part of Offutt AFB at Bellevue.

I also do not know if they make any mention of either the SAC ERCS (Emergency Rocket Communication System) that was at three sites in Eastern Nebraska.

The Blue Scout version of ERCS (Program 279) was deployed to three sites near Wisner, West Point, and Tekamah, Nebraska.

On second thought, I do believe that there is a "Blue Scout" rocket on display, next to the Atlas missile at the entrance to the museum.

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What did the B-25 flight instructor tell the student pilot?

“Always remember that if one engine fails on a twin engine plane, you’ll still have enough power to safely reach the scene of the crash."

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10 hours ago, Rick G. said:

Back in the 1980s, I once saw an Avro Vulcan perform a flying demonstration at an airshow in Canada. They didn’t do a barrel roll with it, but it was a very impressive sight and very loud. A B-52G also flew a flight demo, but was no where near as loud as that Vulcan. 

They also had a Vulcan on static display on the ground that you could look at. 


 

 

The boarding school I went to was on a hill overlooking a major RAAF base.  It was a turning point marker for landings.  Nothing like a Lincoln overhead to disrupt study time at night.

A Vulcan came past and took off straight over us.  I'll agree on the noise.

One of its nick names is "The Tin Triangle"

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

German 20mm cannon vs. U.S. bombers.  Neat, factual video.

 

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1 hour ago, Steve C. said:

 

Note the registration on the tail feathers - VH EAG  and the name "Southern Preservation"

More here

https://aussieairliners.org/l-1049/vh-eag/vheag.html

There is a non-flying example in the QANTAS Founders Museum at Longreach in Queensland

https://qfom.com.au/tag/super-constellation/

along with other planes used by QANTAS over the years

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C-47's being built at the Douglas Aircraft plant in Long Beach, California in 1942. lt amazes me just how quick the USA geared up and started war production so quick after Pearl Harbor. Kind of hard to tell but l think l counted 31 planes in that pic.

image.png.7ad61a16159c27622cc73bc29eb3ed99.png

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Production did take off quickly, but from what I've read, this started well before Pearl Harbor when the war in Europe began to appear likely and then actually started in 1939.  "In May 1940, Franklin D. Roosevelt called for the production of 185,000 aeroplanes, 120,000 tanks, 55,000 anti-aircraft guns and 18 million tons of merchant shipping in two years and congress approved the addition of 3000 planes to the Army Air Force" per Wikipedia.  Another statistic was munitions production tripled from 1939 to 1940 and tripled again in 1941.  Things were well underway prior to Pearl Harbor to provide support to England and its allies although I'm sure production was turned up even further after the US entered the war.

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Some more reading on the engine side that I tripped over - I have a library request in

Allied Aircraft Piston Engines of World War II Hardcover – June 30, 2019

by Graham White (author) (Author)
 
And there is "A History of Aircraft Piston Engines" by Herschel Smith
 
I've got a copy of that one
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B-17 returned from Frankfurt raid after flak blew rear gunner Roy Urich out and he lived to become a POW

 

301228306_4098119347178017_4955431519600424845_n.thumb.jpg.fe2038aece11618e3e3f0942a0a8c72e.jpg

 

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