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Mechanic & Fabrication Bravery?


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For those of us who fix things, how brave are you? Do you stick with what you know, or are you up to almost anything? We do a lot of the same things in our shop. Common stuff and some not so much. We will attempt pretty much anything that belongs to us I guess. How about you guys, anything that scares the hooha out of you? I guess if someone came to us asked us to overhaul their 1155 Massey or worse their John Junk we would be really skittish. Pretty much only do IH. Will fabricate almost anything that isn't too large. So how bout y'all?

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Nothing scares me for myself. Mechanical stuff we pass the more involved things on to other places because of time constraints

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When I worked at the farm as a mechanic I wouldn't hesitate to tear into stuff. I shyed away from engine work just because one little mistake can cost big dollars. I did a few head gaskets and such on engines I was familiar with but anything I didn't know I sent out. I did do a major overhaul on a 466 which was one of my proudest acheivements there but I had an engine shop that was willing to help me if I had questions. As far as other tractor repairs, as long as I could get a hold of the parts break down and pages from a service manual, again I had a good dealer that was willing to help, I would go for it. The only thing that I was apprehensive about was rebuilding the kernel processor for the forage harvesters just because the John Deere dealer told us that nobody else did their own. With the amount of material that goes through it and the speed that those rolls turn and lastly because of the timeliness of a short harvest window a failure of the kp is not good. I just took my time while rebuilding it and it worked well.

I am finding, as with most things, that it is easy to fall out of practice if I don't do much wrenching. I find myself turning down some projects because first off I just don't have time, I don't want to be the guy who takes six months to fix somebody's stuff. Secondly, I just don't think I am as sharp of a mechanic that I was a couple years ago when I did it more and I don't want to make a foolish mistake on somebody else's stuff

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I always figured if it was making me money I should be able to afford to have it fixed. If it is a toy or a fun thing that isn’t making me money, I better be able to learn to fix it myself. That doesn’t mean I wouldn’t work on a money making piece of equipment but I just a basic rule of thumb for me. 

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The biggest factor for me is time, second one is if it takes special tooling 

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1 hour ago, bitty said:

Nothing scares me for myself. Mechanical stuff we pass the more involved things on to other places because of time constraints

Thats us.  I feel if we had a bigger more equipped (organized) shop we would do more/bigger projects.  But they sit in the way of the only spot to work on stuff for weeks since we cannot dedicate all day to something.  A dream is the welding area/shop where we can have room to do more involved projects.  And a Ironworker.....mmmm ironworker.  Band saw...MIG...etc

Kin up road has a nice woodshop.  That be neat too.  Wood work is good and i do enjoy it but putting things out and in each project gets old.  But when you have the correct tools and area it sure makes work easier/enjoyable.

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If somebody could get hurt, or if time, money, or material is going to be wasted, hire it out. I'm lucky that I have more time for me now being semi retired, so if I think I can do it in a reasonable time, without alot of waste, I'm up for literally anything. It's always a chance to learn something new, and I'm all about that

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I would never attempt to fabricate somthing, like a truck mounted backhoe/post driver...

Kidding, im not scared of tackling much.  This was done on a dirt floor with a torch and welder...

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Just now, mader656 said:

I would never attempt to fabricate somthing, like a truck mounted backhoe/post driver...

Kidding, im not scared of tackling much.  This was done on a dirt floor with a torch and welder...

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I diidnt work really well but ive got plans for version 2.0

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Was involved in some pretty big industrial equipment teardown/overhaul projects while doing my apprenticeship, but my last 2 jobs don't involve anything too big or in depth most times so I feel I am not as sharp on stuff as I was. 

   I found while doing my training proper knowledge and tools/place to work make a big difference. I currently don't have anyplace to work inside other than my garage and the older I get the less interested I am in working outside on anything. Had hoped to build a decent shop soon but not sure with the current state of things when or if that will happen. Had hoped to have a nice place to take on some bigger stuff of my own soon. 

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14 minutes ago, mader656 said:

I diidnt work really well but ive got plans for version 2.0

Prototypes are sometimes a necessary evil

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Back from the time I was young it was just me and my brother. First thing I really fondly remember is dad put a short block 6 cylinder in his 59 gmc truck. We helped him put head on and dress the engine. I was 6 or7. After that it was pretty much you guys take apart what you broke on lawnmower or anything although we had a little guidance. Dad would do odd jobs for people and local small coop had a 76 ford fuel truck. The engine was going bad. They talked dad into swapping it I was 14 brother 12. They brought it out Saturday night. Brother and I unbolted most of motor Sunday morning. Dad helped lift it out. A couple guys from coop came out about 3 just as new long block was getting done prepped to go in. They helped line it up. Brother and I bolted bottom together while those guys did top and they drove away with it a 6:00 supper time. After that nothing intimidates me any more I will try to figure out anything

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I am typically not afraid to tackle anything. In the almost year and a half I've been in business I've worked on IH, Case IH, McCormick, ASV, Cat, Jaraff, Case, Deere, Kubota, Bobcat, Freightliner, Kenworth, Navistar and other crap I can't remember. There isn't an overabundance of independent guys around here and I get calls for alot of different things. It keeps it interesting and keeps me on my toes. I always admit to the customer though if I'm not familiar with something and if I think I took to long on something due to inexperience I will adjust the bill accordingly. There are some things I won't do. I'll take injection pumps off but I'm not going to open one up. I don't need the liability of screwing one up. I'll do power shifts trans repairs, engine overhauls, clutches, major combine repairs. I can't do anything with emissions systems on anything yet and I don't really want to but I'm afraid a computer with diagnostic software is in the near future for me. I've had to turn down some work because I couldn't hook a computer to it.

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10 minutes ago, WishIhada1466 said:

. I can't do anything with emissions systems on anything yet and I don't really want to but I'm afraid a computer with diagnostic software is in the near future for me. I've had to turn down some work because I couldn't hook a computer to it.

Its coming...............I did as well.  

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Well, I have an Epson ink-jet printer with a clogged solid head, that needs some attention...

Clicking the "add to cart" button on a new one is looking awful good!!!?

Mike

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I am a decent mechanic, I will repair what I have to, but I send big stuff out. I prefer building stuff or auto body when I can. I did build this.

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I have fabricated a  bunch of stake beds, a few dump beds from scratch, a number of complete Jeep frames, and installed a bunch of already made new and used truck bodies,  snowplows, hydraulic systems and spreaders. I  rebuild all my own engines and also do them for close friends.  Same with manual transmissions and axles.  I have lengthened and shortened a number of heavy trucks and double framed them. Swapped axles, tandem sets and done 4wd conversions.  That said,  most of what I do now is installing dump boxes and refurbishing equipment trailers.  I paint when I have to but I don't like it.  If I am building a trailer or box, I try to talk em into getting it galvanized.  

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i know a few who think they can build/fix anything, turns out they were mistaken.

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It depends on how mad/broke/disgusted or desperate I am.

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I realize this is an apple and orange topic with me as aside from rebuilding compressors I've always worked on four wheel vehicles and bikes and never was scared away, the last job I tackled was my girls jeep rad and cooling system, what is stopping me now is age and body breakdown, that said I still do some of my own stuff.

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I used to work in an equipment dealership, then worked on trucks a bit, never hired out work on our farm, always have done repair work for all the locals. A good friend recently asked me to rebuild his 619 JD engine after JD quoted him $24,000 for the engine work. I told him for as much as I'd like to, I don't want to. I always warranty my work, and a fluke deal could wipe out about  $15,000 in parts and machine shop labor, and ruin a friendship. I don't need that kind of work, those aren't known to be a real bulletproof engine.

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Here we work on about any major brand of tractor, but try to specialize in IH & CaseIH tractors & Cummins engines. Do a lot of skid steer work to include hydrostat repairs. The key to any job is having the service information, where to get parts and special tools if needed. I would rate our metal lathe as one of the most used tools, many many times over the years we stop and build a tool for the job. Have a wall full of homemade "special" tools that probably have zero value to anybody but me. Do all of our own injector work, sub out some inj. pump work depending what it is. 

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The only thing I won't work on is the newer autos' if I can't see it's physically broke, it goes to a repair shop. 

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I am not afraid of much for myself, i don't like working on junk for other people who don't get it, it gets into money quickly, most don't want to fix things properly, and that doesn’t work for me. Used to cringe whenever there was another issue with the forklift at the local feed/general store. I finally (with some help from his brothers) talked the owner into a nice new Toyota LP forklift. Only trouble now is my monthly bill comes out of my pocket ?

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