Jump to content

Recommended Posts

My Dad has a '78 F-350 plow truck with a rusted out cab and a '79 F-250 parts truck with a blown engine and good cab. We are doing a swap and are trying to figure out what the transmissions are and if we can swap engines.

Dad wants to do a engine swap but I want a cab swap. The F-350 was a local trucker's cobalation so the vin is no help. We know it has a 360 in it but I have never checked to see if the vin matches. It has heavier axles and transfer case and my Dad and brothers rebuilt the engine about 7 or 8 years ago.

Where (if there are any) are the tags on the transmissions? They are both 4 speeds.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cab swaps on those trucks are dead easy. Just switch the complete wiring harness between cabs also.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

We got the bad engine out of the good cab, then Dad looked at the trans in the rusty cab and he starts thinking maybe this aint gonna work.

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, exSW said:

Cab swaps on those trucks are dead easy. Just switch the complete wiring harness between cabs also.

Wiring harness stays with cab? Or engine?

Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to have a cab swap certified by the state.  Cab and chassis frames have to match Vin numbers.  I did one last winter.  State certified it. 

You can't tell by looking if the transmissions are the same? That era typically had a bolt on bell housing.  Should be obvious if they interchange.  If not, swap bell housings. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, IH OAK said:

Wiring harness stays with cab? Or engine?

Wiring harness stays with engine.

And it depends on the State. Also end use.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

78 would not have originally had a 360 in it from factory but could be part of the “cobalation”. I would think 4spd would have been an NP435 in a 3/4 or 1 ton truck either year. Axles could have been different things depending on package. F250 would have been D44 front D60 rear unless equipped with snow plow package which got D60 front and rear.  F350 would have had a D70 rear and D60 front most likely. In 78 and 79 the only V8s offered in a 4x4 were the 351m and 400m.  You could get a 460 in a 2x4 but not a 4x4 from the factory. Lots of years between then and now for people to swap though....

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, exSW said:

And it depends on the State. Also end use.

My point is you better find out first.  It's not one of those things you do then ask questions.  You can end up in a very bad position that way.  Know what the legal path is first, then proceed accordingly.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ford transmissions have riveted tags on them. Google it and you'll see lots of photos of what the tags look like. Sometimes they're missing, but you might get lucky

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

78 would not have originally had a 360 in it from factory but could be part of the “cobalation”. I would think 4spd would have been an NP435 in a 3/4 or 1 ton truck either year. Axles could have been different things depending on package. F250 would have been D44 front D60 rear unless equipped with snow plow package which got D60 front and rear.  F350 would have had a D70 rear and D60 front most likely. In 78 and 79 the only V8s offered in a 4x4 were the 351m and 400m.  You could get a 460 in a 2x4 but not a 4x4 from the factory. Lots of years between then and now for people to swap though....

If I remember right it is a F-450 chassis, I know it was something different from the cab. I remember something about the rear being a chevy (dually). I don't know if it is a factory 4X4, the transfer case is about a foot and a half behind the trans, while it is bolted to the trans like normal in the parts truck.

19 hours ago, J-Mech said:

You have to have a cab swap certified by the state.  Cab and chassis frames have to match Vin numbers.  I did one last winter.  State certified it. 

You can't tell by looking if the transmissions are the same? That era typically had a bolt on bell housing.  Should be obvious if they interchange.  If not, swap bell housings. 

It's just a plow truck for our place. Anyhow, it aint the state's business what we do with our stuff. I feel sorry for folks that live in extremely communist states like Illinois and California.

The transmissions are definitely different. Dad just wants to be sure of what to do (I still want a cab swap). 

The cross member in front of the engine that the plow bracket mounts to is perpendicular to the main channels on the plow truck, but it in on an angle in the parts truck.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, IH OAK said:

If I remember right it is a F-450 chassis, I know it was something different from the cab. I remember something about the rear being a chevy (dually). I don't know if it is a factory 4X4, the transfer case is about a foot and a half behind the trans, while it is bolted to the trans like normal in the parts truck.

It's just a plow truck for our place. Anyhow, it aint the state's business what we do with our stuff. I feel sorry for folks that live in extremely communist states like Illinois and California.

The transmissions are definitely different. Dad just wants to be sure of what to do (I still want a cab swap). 

The cross member in front of the engine that the plow bracket mounts to is perpendicular to the main channels on the plow truck, but it in on an angle in the parts truck.

There were no F450 trucks until the late 80’s or early 90’s. Probably a divorced mounted t—case which was stock on earlier Ford trucks through early 1977 on the “high boy” models. Basically a 2wd tranny with a short drive shaft that ran the t-case. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

There were no F450 trucks until the late 80’s or early 90’s. Probably a divorced mounted t—case which was stock on earlier Ford trucks through early 1977 on the “high boy” models. Basically a 2wd tranny with a short drive shaft that ran the t-case. 

Yup what Sledgehammer just noted, it's either a np205 gear to gear transfer, or the 208 I believe, chain driven transfer. I have a 205 now in the 65 IH 1200 plow truck. With it being driveshaft driven, most any divorced tranny can drive it. Good luck

Mark

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, td9inidaho said:

Yup what Sledgehammer just noted, it's either a np205 gear to gear transfer, or the 208 I believe, chain driven transfer. I have a 205 now in the 65 IH 1200 plow truck. With it being driveshaft driven, most any divorced tranny can drive it. Good luck

Mark

The later Ford divorced cases were the 205. I had a 76 with the 205. They are gear drive as noted above and can be identified by a small circle in the center of the rear of the case with three bolts going through it. All three major auto makers used them at some point and they are very strong and reliable.

DD13E878-767F-4E3A-90E0-93A2FD6B4C6E.jpeg

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Cast iron all gear transfer case New process model 205, basically the gold standard for light duty transfer cases. I had one in our IH 1200D 4X4  pickup and 1100D 4X4 Travelal  Don't believe it ever showed up in a Scout. Later ones were basically a warmed over Dodge drive train. Dodge always used NP because NP was a division of Chrysler Corp.

Believe Ford only used it in a F250 and above.  A directly connected TC would have a different transmission case.  By the late 80's all pickups used low-cost chain  drive transfer cases.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, IH OAK said:

Anyhow, it aint the state's business what we do with our stuff.

If it has a title, you can bet your azz it's the states business, kiddo. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/5/2021 at 12:39 PM, KWRB said:

Ford transmissions have riveted tags on them. Google it and you'll see lots of photos of what the tags look like. Sometimes they're missing, but you might get lucky

 

It won't be a Ford transmission in that year and application.  They are likely New Process or Borg Warner.  I'm betting NP.   

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, J-Mech said:

If it has a title, you can bet your azz it's the states business, kiddo. 

Unless its never gonna leave the farm and won't be sold to someone else later wanting to put it on the road.

The automatic trannies with case attached had an adapter piece that bolted between tcase and a short shaft tranny iirc. Had a guy want to buy a full time transfer case only so I separated them and sold it to him. Not sure how the manual ones were set up but probably similar?

I would think a divorced transfer case would be preferable, then you could use any transmission with a short adapter drive shaft between them.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the tags on the plow truck "Rumble"...

Trans says...

   D3TA7003RB   FL107 

        12  4  74       435

 

Front axle...

   409 D3TA-HA

      603396-1

 

TC...

   Model (205)  Ratio  (1 96)

Serial (8       15      74)

Assem No. (D3TA7A195AA)

 

On 1/6/2021 at 3:18 PM, J-Mech said:

If it has a title, you can bet your azz it's the states business, kiddo. 

I couldn't find that in the constitution anywhere...:unsure:

On 1/6/2021 at 12:07 PM, Sledgehammer said:

The later Ford divorced cases were the 205. I had a 76 with the 205. They are gear drive as noted above and can be identified by a small circle in the center of the rear of the case with three bolts going through it. All three major auto makers used them at some point and they are very strong and reliable.

DD13E878-767F-4E3A-90E0-93A2FD6B4C6E.jpeg

Ours is a gear drive then.

I don't have time to get the parts truck on the hoist right now, but I might later...

Thanks, all yall

Link to post
Share on other sites

TC is a NP

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, IH OAK said:

I couldn't find that in the constitution anywhere...:unsure:

It's in the 10th Ammendment.  Check it out. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Front axle is a Dana 44 with 4.09 gears. 
 

I'm guessing tranny is an NP435

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

I finally got the cab fixed up and on the chassis. The floor pans were almost as rusty as the old cab. We did a sort of a redneck cab lift...two-by-four chunks two high. Sorry about the pic quality, my camera is a piece of junk.

SUNP0003.thumb.JPG.aa1e189271f0ece64a708ab68d7e2d98.JPG

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My 79 Bronco had a homemade body lift made from square tubing with holes drilled for the longer body mount bolts.  They bolted it solid without rubber pucks.  It made the cab vibrate horribly and the shifters fit weird though the floor and it was straining the telescoping steering joint.  I pulled them out and replaced with a 2" body lift kit.  The rubber mounts rode much nicer.  Yes, the body was lower, but the controls worked much better. Plus, the bumper lined up nicer with the grille assembly too!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

We still have the rubber and I'm extending the steering shaft.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, IH OAK said:

We still have the rubber and I'm extending the steering shaft.

You are an accident waiting to happen, you know that? 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...