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5 hours ago, EquipmentJunkie said:

Reading that Detroit Diesel ad was interesting.  I would like to know in reality how the 365-hp "Big 'Squeezer" 8V-92TT compared to the Cummins NTC-350 in terms of fuel economy and performance.  The Detroit must have been pretty decent.

I remember seeing market share numbers for Class 8 truck engines from the late-'70s or very early-'80s and while I can't remember details now, Detroit Diesel had very strong market share.  That all disappeared by the time The Captain (Roger Penske) bought them from GM in the late-'80s.

We have a mid to late 70s Pete 352 with a 435 hp silver 8V92.  I’m not a huge fan of screaming jimmies but I’ll put this one up against any 855 of that  period.  I’ve pulled the same loads with it as with our KW T600 with a 425 hp 3406.  And it will beat that Cat off the line and get up to speed in half the time.  
 

I have a neighbor that farmed with a Big Bud 400/30 for a few years. It had the same engine as in our Pete.  I asked him one time how it performed and he said it did alright exactly what it was suppose to pull.  He other tractors were a Ford Versatile 976 370 hp 855 and JD 9520 450 hp so he did have something to compare it too.

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On 1/6/2021 at 7:35 PM, jeeper61 said:

Love that line of Transtars Thx for posting.

That equip hauler with the 2 KWs had his second truck set up for the heavy stuff 

Anyone drive a truck with a 2sp tandem?

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I have driven two different twin screw tandems that had a 5 speed with two speed rear axles. Not very common as far as twin screws go. They weren’t a single axle with a tag axle added. Both rear ends had the two speed actuators. 

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On 1/8/2021 at 7:39 AM, Cool1566 said:

I have driven two different twin screw tandems that had a 5 speed with two speed rear axles. Not very common as far as twin screws go. They weren’t a single axle with a tag axle added. Both rear ends had the two speed actuators. 

Thanks for the input 

With the 5 speed it makes sense doubles the gears

That guys 74 KW had a 15 speed with a 425HP sounds more like the low would have been intended more for off road. 

Reading the Eaton info they claim reduced drivetrain shock loads in the low end so that would make sense for off road heavy loads  

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1 hour ago, jeeper61 said:

Thanks for the input 

With the 5 speed it makes sense doubles the gears

That guys 74 KW had a 15 speed with a 425HP sounds more like the low would have been intended more for off road. 

Reading the Eaton info they claim reduced drivetrain shock loads in the low end so that would make sense for off road heavy loads  

Yes that’s what I meant when I said it would be like a tandem axle wheat truck. Most are only 5 speeds but with the 2 speed rears you have a high and low for each gear. You split the gears like the high side of a 13 speed tranny.

  I caught the 15 speed part and thought about it with the weights it said he hauled. It must have had pretty low ratio for those weights and no more torque than engines had back then. 
  My cousin has an old western oilfield company Cabover and its max speed is 50mph in 13th tacked out foot to the floor. Only time I got it up to 60 was going down hill with a load of wheat on pulling a 56 model hopper and I put it in neutral. This would of been in the late 90’s when I drove it regular. I would of liked having the 2 speed rears on that truck.  Granny low is creeping slower than walking speed. That would of been good for getting those heavy loads moving back then

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I was trying figure out if the 2 speed rear got him a better gear split.

An 18 speed has a 17% gear split 15 and 13 speeds are around 30% the two speed rear IRC is 25% so on paper it it doesn't look like spliting the rear on the hyway would be much advantage 

The 5 speeds have a large gear split 50% or more so the 2 speed rear works well with them 

 

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I had a 72 cab over freightliner with a 335 Cummins that put 420 hp to the ground with a 5 spd and 3 spd air shift twin screw.On Mt Eagle I would  watch for the big Pete's in the  left lane  beside me to start to move the stick then flip the  button  and leave him in a cloud of smoke. With the power  divider in only the front rear-end would  shift. Don't  ask how I found that out!

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1 hour ago, sking said:

I had a 72 cab over freightliner with a 335 Cummins that put 420 hp to the ground with a 5 spd and 3 spd air shift twin screw.On Mt Eagle I would  watch for the big Pete's in the  left lane  beside me to start to move the stick then flip the  button  and leave him in a cloud of smoke. With the power  divider in only the front rear-end would  shift. Don't  ask how I found that out!

Is that the set up were they switch between the front and rear diff in the middle and hi ?

Putting one or other in "neutral" 

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Under normal conditions both  rears shifted  at the same time, no neutral. With the  power  divider engaged the front axle would  shift all 3 ranges and the rear axle would  stay in low.Really interesting experience with about 60,000 on.

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23 minutes ago, sking said:

Under normal conditions both  rears shifted  at the same time, no neutral. With the  power  divider engaged the front axle would  shift all 3 ranges and the rear axle would  stay in low.Really interesting experience with about 60,000 on.

I was curious so I looked up the mechanical operation this was the description I found on a rebuilders site.

"Both tandems were heavy duty 2 speed rear ends. In low, both differentials were in low range, in direct one differential was in low and the other ran in high, then in overdrive, both were in high. In direct, this put abnormal wear on the interaxle differential, (there's a power divider between the front tandem axle and the rear). It was something the designers evidently didn't think about but it gave us job security overhauling them during that time period. When the power divider went south, usually chunks of it got into the front differential and messed it up too."

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