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What line of work are you in


junkandcattle
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2 hours ago, junkandcattle said:

I wondered how long before an attorney popped up we have about everything else covered. Glad I didn't make any lawyer jokes

I’m curious if he found a loophole in growing weed??

You and vt need to get together sounds like similar interests and an electrician comes in handy for bypassing meters if you move indoors 

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4 hours ago, IH766 said:

Started out of high school working for Precision Drilling, then went to school for my ag business diploma. Worked as an agronomist for a few years before meeting a girl. Moved down to southern MB to be with her and worked at a grain elevator for a while. Moved back up to where we are now and I ran a custom spraying outfit for a bit, then managed a crop input site for a couple years. Bought the original family farm when we moved up here, and now I work as an ag lender at a Credit Union and we run a sheep flock.

Precision must not have been very big back then they bought up lots of small companies since, not much moving in rig activity now, might never recover 

Must have some crazy stories working in the patch back then

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16 minutes ago, Dave Downs said:

I started a big long reply and decided to just say this - 

When I was a little kid I wanted to do 3 things - fly airplanes, farm and operate a big bulldozer.

Yes I’ve had good and bad but I got to do the 3 things that the little kid that was me wanted to do.

Sounds great to me so long as it didn't involve flying a plane into a big bulldozer on your farm. haha

I wanted to raise pigs what a dummy

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I guess this has evolved so I will add a little to mine. I own the home where my Great Grandparents lived.  This farm has been in my family since the 1830’s. My Father runs Polled Shorthorns in the same barns my Great Grandpa did here on the farm. Wife teaches high school.  I like mechanics more than livestock so Dad fixes animals and I fix everything else that I can. 

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I grew up on a peanut farm in Crisp County Georgia. Daddy passed away when I was 14 in 1982.  
 I farmed with my brother for a few years. Got married, had a daughter and son. The state of Georgia went on a prison building spree in the mid 90s and for some reason I thought it would be a good idea to work for the Department of Corrections. I stuck that out for 12 years. Then went to work for a fertilizer/seed/chemical company blending and hauling fertilizer among other things. I’ve been with them ever since and the only way they’ll get rid of me is to shut the place down. I mostly do spreading and vrt soil sampling now and I really enjoy my work. Sometimes in the fall when we’re slow at work I’ll help some customers picking peanuts just because I enjoy doing it. 
 I’ve been married for almost 32 years, our children are grown. My daughter is married and living in the Atlanta area working as a pharmacist.

My son was working for one of our competitors doing the same kind of work I do. 
 He kind of had a life change in March ( due to female relationship) and had moved back in with us until he got another place to live. April 25th he was riding his atv down the road when a deer ran out of the woods and he hit it, got thrown off the front going about 45-50. He had some severe injuries pretty much from head to toe, the two worst were; a patch of skin and tissue about the size of my hand torn off his scalp above his right ear and a broken right leg/ankle. The only thing holding his foot on was his Achilles’ tendon and some skin/tissue on the top of his ankle. 
 He stayed laid up from April until about the last 6 weeks or so. My wife was out of work for five months to stay home and take care of him as he couldn’t be left alone. 
She returned to work in mid September and he’s walking again now and is still improving, he still uses a cane some but seems to be getting stronger by the day now. We’ll all be glad to see 2020 done. 
Every day above ground is a good day.
 

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Was raised on a small dairy farm in the southern tier of NY. Started doing a mans work at age 10.  Went to a tech school for 2 years, uncle sam sent me a letter--spent a year in Viet Nam.  Got a job with a whoesale Hdwe distributer as a stock clerk, worked my up to being the warehouse manager, at one time I had 120 people working for me. Retired when I was 70.

I don't post on here very much because I don't have the knowledge that most of you do. However I check in every night to learn some thing new. I have gained more knowledge here on Red Power than I ever learned in school. 

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22 minutes ago, Dave Downs said:

I started a big long reply and decided to just say this - 

When I was a little kid I wanted to do 3 things - fly airplanes, farm and operate a big bulldozer.

Yes I’ve had good and bad but I got to do the 3 things that the little kid that was me wanted to do.

Awesome reply

I wanted to be a stunt driver as a kid, I’m not a paid Hollywood driver but between racing and derby I’ve accomplished that, and I have a real grader, had a toy grader as a kid, 10 year old me would approve 

 

 

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Grew up in town, moved to the former dairy farm my dad was raised on when I finished high school to work on a large peach operation to pay my way through college. Couldn’t find a job when I finished so went back to school and earned a MS in Agronomy.  Going on 20 years as an Area Agronomic Crops Agent and Certified Crop Advisor with the Extension Service. Built my shop in 2014 and work when I can with my in-laws on a soybean, wheat, beef and poultry operation. Volunteer with the Fire Dept also. 

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builder/contractor,commercial kitchen equipment repair and installer, welder/installer for a industreial control company

[till the auto companys went chapter 11]

Department of the Interior,National Park Service till 2011 job site accident [early retirement]

retired pig farmer in Da yoop.

Mike

 

 

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Thanks to everyone who has replied. My hat is off to each and every single one of you. There is a deep well of experience and determination in this forum and a broad array of backgrounds. Several of you have overcame obstacles that would stop a good many people.

I think we have had everything except politicians and prostitutes post here so we could probably find some candidates of merit to run for office. PLEASE

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Grew up on a small crop farm. My dad retired last year and my brother has taken over. I was never a farmer, I was always the mechanic, although I like doing tillage work. I worked in an engine machine shop for a couple years, worked at a heavy equipment dealership as a welder and mechanic for nearly 10 years, now my day job is driving truck for the county I live in, taking care of and maintaining a township, and a third of the adjoining twp. Plowing the roads, mowing the roadsides, scraping the gravel roads, cutting trees, etc. I'm a state certified truck mechanic, so when things in the townships are at a lull, I will go work in the main garage on trucks to help them get caught up (we don't have enough mechanics). I'm always call, any time, any day. I work 4-10's in the summer, which allows me to drive truck on the weekends for others. Pulled logs for a couple years, pull equipment in the summer. I repair all makes and all models of trucks, tractors, combines and equipment for many people in the area in the evenings. I pick what jobs I want to do, and who I want to do them for, and everybody is great about it. I also do small logging jobs here and there, usually anything 50-75 trees, I don't have time to do bigger jobs than that. I like to be busy, although my definition of busy is much different than many people who claim they're "always busy".

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2 hours ago, exSW said:

I run a Locomotive.

I build locomotives. And streetcars. And mining and tunneling locomotives and personnel carriers for underground use

Just made 30 yrs of traveling and repairing all of the above. Live on and own 4th generation farm. Have beef but also raise pigs in summer. Sell to family and friends only. Also make and sell hay. Rebuild and use old red tractors and mostly  red equipment. Although my round baler is green

 

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Raised on a sidehill grain and cattle ranch in the Land of Fruits and Nuts.  Think steep like the Palouse country of Washington state. But big white limestone rocks, oak trees and poison oak. Have live with 7 inches of rain for a year all the way to 60, 20 is the normal. It drops a about a inch a mile as you go east from here.  Planted my first 50 acres of barley in 78.  Did outside work taking care of 70 acres of walnut. My dad had 250 beef cows on 3 or 4 different places spread 10 to 15 miles, so spent a lot of time there. In 79 to 85 drove a Gleaner MH2 combine from June to Sept in barley, and oats and then another 4 or 5 weeks in safflower. Most of the cutting was a BTO crop, but he was on the edge of broke and took a lot outside cutting. My last grain to harvest was in 16.

The Lord helped me and my family through some slim times. Always coming up with a fence building job, help harvest walnuts. Never had more than 700 acres planted, but some good safflower crops and prices helped. Put up 10,000 bales of volunteer barley hay in extra wet year when planted crops where poor.

Wine grapes and billionaire's have taken over the neighborhood. In 98 a landlord wanted to plant 15 acres of grapes. He had a old timer that had grown grapes, almonds, and apples for 30 years as his adviser/manager.  I took on day to day on site supervisor of the south of the border labor and I did anything done with a tractor. Was looking learn another crop, which I did. But wine makers are as big of as whole to deal with there are, so changed my mind about ever planting a grape.  Besides still farming 300 to 400 acres. In 15 management of vineyard changed. In the summer of 16 I had the "summer of ****" and spent 20 some days on and off in the hospital with gallbladder trouble and pancreatic trouble. In 18 the owner had vines bulldozed, as to many grapes for the market. But moneyed people are still paying $20,000+/ per acre to buy land to plant grapes to tell "friends" this wine is from my grape.

My dad had give up his cattle in 03 I think it was which was down to 60 head, so took those over. Been trying to get back to 100 head, city land owners that don't want those "polluting cows" and drought have kept that from happening. 

By God's grace and my wife's school teaching job she started in about 93 or 4 we put 3 kids through college with no student loans on their part.? But a little of that government welfare helped. The oldest was 17 and graduating, crops and prices where terrible and the tax guy got us some earned income credit which set him up help all 5 years of his college. They about took my farm expenses away as a hobby farmer with my wife's big wages though. Well it was the exhalent heath insurance that saved the day with my "summer from ****", wages are not enough when the kids can do anything they want.  

But I am still scratching around planting hay and run some cows. Should sell out, but I am 4th generation to farm this home place. One son would like to run the cows, and do all kinds of little side jobs. But literally being surrounded on 2 sides by a billionaire farmer it doesn't look good for anybody else here.   

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2 hours ago, ray54 said:

The Lord helped me and my family through some slim times. Always coming up with a fence building job, help harvest walnuts.

The Lord helps those that help themselves.

Especially true today, there is always work to be found for those willing to work.

Some of the most gut wrenching news we got as a young family was "we are not renewing your lease on this ranch". But you know what? The phone always rang and we always found a place to go. And each time we moved, we met a whole new community of wonderful people.

The outpouring of fellowship and help I have received my entire life is very humbling to me.

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7 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

The Lord helps those that help themselves.

Especially true today, there is always work to be found for those willing to work.

Some of the most gut wrenching news we got as a young family was "we are not renewing your lease on this ranch". But you know what? The phone always rang and we always found a place to go. And each time we moved, we met a whole new community of wonderful people.

The outpouring of fellowship and help I have received my entire life is very humbling to me.

Yes, Jeff....simply because you are a rural bloke ....the rural community is just the greatest......Sure..there is an occasional rectal orifice...but generally ...few...and far between....

Look at the "community" on this site....the majority ..if not farming today, in one form or another...came from  a line of farming  fore-fathers....and mothers......As we would say down under......all "bloody good blokes "

Mike

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3rd generation sheep, cattle and cropping farmer. I have also spent plenty of hours in a shearing shed as a roustabout and wool classes. Travelled overseas and worked in seismic drilling in Canada, farm worker in the UK as well. 
Currently still running the farm and have been in the mining game for 9 years at the same time. I operate D11 dozers, Cat 793 dump trucks and run the dewatering pumps from time to time. 

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6 hours ago, junkandcattle said:

 

I think we have had everything except politicians and prostitutes post here

Well, now we have to find a prostitute since I was elected to the Township Board of Supervisors back in 1980??

A few more things -

First tractor I ran alone was F-12 on steel 

First car was 1948 Ford coupe with ‘56 Lincoln engine, that was in 1962, had lots more hot rods and 2 Corvettes, ‘64 and ‘69.

Penna. Army National Guard ‘64 to ‘71, Penna. Air National Guard ‘84 to ‘89. Still with my Air Guard unit (111th Attack Wing, oldest Air Guard unit in the country) as a volunteer historian.

Spent most of my life working in Land Surveying/Civil Engineering, had my own Surveying company for 27 years, did a lot of construction layout as well as site design. Still working part-time for a small engineering firm.

Diagnosed with rectal Cancer in October of 2005, given 50-50 chance of surviving 2 years. Went through a year of Radiation, Surgery and Chemo. As miserable as 2020 is, 2006 was the worst year of my life.

In 2002 I went to China with my sister when she adopted her 3rd daughter from there. She has always been my favorite niece. 
 

My wife died in 2017, still miss her and I hated living alone. When COVID shut down the colleges my niece came to live with me, a really great kid and I’m not alone anymore.

Live in an old farmhouse, I can see the town I was born in (Doylestown, PA) from my porch.

Lots more stuff, no time......

 

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I grew up on a dairy farm in northern Indiana in the 1960s (b. 1949).  Like many farmers around us, we had Farmall tractors, an M and an H for most work - raising corn, baling hay, filling silo, and spreading manure.  We showed our registered Guernseys at the 4-H fair and always had a couple Hereford steers to show and sell at the livestock auction which concluded the fair.  The local IH dealer, Nelson Equipment in Culver, Indiana usually purchased one of the steers.

I left the farm in 1967.  In 1971, after 4 years at Purdue, a degree in Forestry, and an unlucky lottery draw I was drafted into the US Army Infantry.  19 months and 7 days later the service was behind me.  After about 5 years in southern Kentucky, working in the woods. building pole barns, I met my wife who convinced me it might be time to use the forestry degree.

I spent a few years with the Indiana DNR in southern Indiana - cruising, marking timber, sale administration, timber trespass, and fire suppression - then took a job as a federal forester working with native Americans in northern Wisconsin and Michigan.  In the mid-1990s field forestry gave way to GIS and Remote Sensing, and finally Information Resource Management.  I retired from the US Forest Service in 2014.

Joining the forums a few years ago, initially for advice on keeping our IH 584 operational, I return daily for perspective, insight, and occasional inspiration.  

 

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I work for PA Dep during the day inspecting the wellsites and pipelines to be sure they are growing right and no erosion is happening to the land. I make sure the gas companies are reclaiming and seeding the land the way the farmers want. I also have a small metal fabrication business after work. I install dump beds, salt spreaders, plows and such. I also lengthen and shorten trucks. I do a roadside vegetable stand some years and I am doing a few pigs this year. I helped a friend on his dairy farm when I was a kid and always loved it. I respect dairy farmers above near anyone,  a more honest,  decent and hardworking bunch of people than most anyone. Most dairy farms are gone around me,  they do beef or are retired.  If I could farm full time and make money, I would do it before anything else.  I settle for piddling around part time at farming.  God bless you guys who do it every day.  You keep our country running and the world fed. Other than helping the farmers get their land put back right,  I don't like my job. I plan on going back to operating heavy equipment in a few years,  soon as my student loans are paid off. More money and I am good at it. I have done it most of my adult life,  even when going to college.  (I don't recommend college unless the student has a specific job lined up that they love and is highly paying.  For me,  it was a waste of time and money. )

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