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that's the end


ny bill o
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for my Holsteins. I took the last bred heifer to her new home today. She is a 15 generation descendant of my first 4H cow, Maybelle. The sires in her pedigree start with Sears in 1961, continue with Orlo, Ted, Lindy, Berlin, Race (who probably did me more good than any of the others), Trendy, Zebo, Lynch, Dymon, and several others. It was a sad ride over and back. I'll have more time to play with my tractors, but still....

Last Moozoo heifer Sheila+Bill 12-7-20.JPG

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That’s a pretty cool history Bill. Not many could accomplish that. Congrats to you for a good accomplishment even though the day was somewhat bittersweet. 

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Bill I feel for you. i sold my calves today. Pregged tested my Angus cows today and they will be on the truck by Friday. A neighboring rancher bought them. I couldnt afford feeding them through the long winter at $160/ton hay and i will be turning 67 in March. No help as my girls are in college and starting their lives. Really loved my girlys in the corral. My solace in life

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I have many memories of the heifer we called Little Short that looked exactly like her. 
Bought her home to the farm where we raised her in 1959 Ford station wagon . As we were coming home a car passed us that my future wife was in returning from a family trip to Youngstown. They tooted there horn as they passed . But the driver worked with my dad and he said do you know him he ask my wife. we met three or four years later. 
She always talks about the day we passed you ,you were holding a calf in car coming home from Youngstown. Gosh that was a long time ago ,thank you for the time to recall the good memories 
 

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Yikes Ed, I didn’t know that hay was going that high not all that far away. I have seen people getting that here on big squares, but not even close on rounds. Good luck on making things work on your place.

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I feel for you Bill 

When bank sold out my spring herd, at least I was able to keep my fall herd.

It really hurt to watch thos pots roll out of the yard that cold January day.

Remain positive, keep the fond memories and stay busy.

I wish you luck in the future.

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...Bill......that would be hard to let that life times of work go...but I guess circumstances   and the age old battle with 'age'  all play a part in the final decision.....From what I read on here, your dairy  industry seems almost in tatters for some producers.....very sad....Down under here, the dairy industry has keep our little show ''on the road''...but the people that know best.....the experts , who co incidentally seem to belong to the NZ Green Party......all say we have far too many'' cows''..... This rhetoric   becomes a little tiresome , when the income from these "cows'   " is analyzed.......and it comes in the billions of dollars  from the exports......

All the best for your "bovine less future", Bill 

Mike

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I went to work for a feedlot owner in 1980. He had had a dairy in the past and I asked him if he missed it? He said, "Yes,but it is a good miss". I don't miss milking but I will miss my cows when they are gone. But I am looking forward to not being tied down. I'm sure you will fill your time with your other interests.

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wow bill, good for you, being able to shut things down on your own terms when you are ready and then plan for the next thing is something remarkable. I will be praying for contentment - I know things I miss about my farm life as a kid but life happens and I have it in my blood so I still do what i can and engage as I can with it. 

I have found ways to do things but its not the same - i plan to do more when I retire as I am still able. I hope you can keep doing what brings you joy - blessings 

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I had to look at the date on this post, as I thought I had read it before.?

Just remember the first 3 letters of lactose is LAC..Life After Cows. lol

I am sure it was not easy watching that last heifer with such a long line go. Now its time to start some tractor restoration..that should keep you busy for awhile! good luck Bill, come up and visit when King Cuomo allows!

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It has been a 2 1/2 year slowdown. We sold the milking cows in 2015, when it was obvious that the high milk price (and cow prices) weren't going to last. But I wasn't ready to quit. I took the heifers as they freshened to my neighbor's tie stall until he ran out of room. So we started back up with 21 first calf heifers, (Linda wasn't thrilled), got to almost 100 milking of our own animals, until 2018, when the cows left again, most all to another expanding herd. That time, I was ready to slow down, and sold the bagging heifers as they got close or hatched. Sheila was born of a reject cow at the neighbor's (still going and classified 85 this summer) 6 mos after the herd left, and was the last one.
Thanks for all the well wishes and comments. I have lots of tractors, like Chris says.  Maybe the shop will finally get hoed out so I can work in there.

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On 12/7/2020 at 9:16 PM, edwardporter1 said:

Bill I feel for you. i sold my calves today. Pregged tested my Angus cows today and they will be on the truck by Friday. A neighboring rancher bought them. I couldnt afford feeding them through the long winter at $160/ton hay and i will be turning 67 in March. No help as my girls are in college and starting their lives. Really loved my girlys in the corral. My solace in life

oh bummer ed, sorry to hear that, i cant even imagine what that is like but i know what it is like to miss your children. I lived in MT a while and I cant believe how expensive hay gets out there its so expensive. Hang in there !!! 

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