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1946 T-6 Crawler


Mogulman
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Could but having been in this museum numerous times I'm guessing it will all be manual machining and that's not intended negatively 

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22 hours ago, mmi said:

SOOOO

can you spec them and just program CNC to pop them out?

We could, but they are simple enough and will come out quickly on the old manual lathe and mill the museum has…only time is needed to do this there, no other expenses.

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1 hour ago, Mogulman said:

We could, but they are simple enough and will come out quickly on the old manual lathe and mill the museum has…only time is needed to do this there, no other expenses.

What alloy will you use. Do you have your own heat treat capability. Those deep lube holes in the end will be the pain in an engine lathe. We deep drilled many tons of  pins in Warner Swasey turret lathes. You can't beat them for heavy stock removal also. They are cheap to pick up in this era of CNC . You know one would make a nice museum piece ......truly a landmark of industrial history. I hate to think how many have died an undignified death.

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41 minutes ago, just Dave said:

What alloy will you use. Do you have your own heat treat capability. Those deep lube holes in the end will be the pain in an engine lathe. We deep drilled many tons of  pins in Warner Swasey turret lathes. You can't beat them for heavy stock removal also. They are cheap to pick up in this era of CNC . You know one would make a nice museum piece ......truly a landmark of industrial history. I hate to think how many have died an undignified death.

We discussed this for a while.  The metal will be a high grade steel.  We could harden them, but we debated how much will it be used.  It will never work every day again.  It will maybe pull a small plow once a year.  More likely less than that even.  It will get driven 2-3 hours a year at most.  None of us alive today will never need to replace them.  The machining does not worry the machinist at all and he will have no trouble making these.  He has made considerably tougher items in the past.  He was originally planning on just grinding them...but when we started looking we realized how far he would have to go and the amount they would need to be ground (some of them we debated may even go smaller that the bushings we just put in), on top of having bad seal surfaces, it would be more efficient to make new ones.  I am sure he will debate himself about the hardening in the process as he mentioned some of his options including nitrogen hardening them if he decides it is necessary.  That is the next step...we will see where it goes.

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I have marveled at the quality of material and heat treat involved in my old IH tractors.... You as restorers have done amazing work on this machine with the prep and restoration of worn metal.  You owe it to your selves to put a hard shaft in the rollers. Even a case hardening or a carburizing would be well worth while.

On 2/5/2022 at 4:44 PM, Mogulman said:

The machining does not worry the machinist at all and he will have no trouble making these.  He has made considerably tougher items in the past.

The small diameter deep hales are not difficult just a pain .  If you have a moment to ask the Machinist,  what alloy are you using?

Thanks Dave

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They are deep drilled from one end and cross drilled in two places . Spray weld /metalizing is big cost , it would require removing about a 1//4 off the diameter for prep.   If they are the typical IH quality heat treated alloy that would be slow and hard on expensive lathe tooling.  On a stubby shaft like that you could get by with 1045 and case hardening. If it was my tractor it would not look nearly as fabulous these men have done but it would not have soft feet.....I would take the existing shafts down to smooth via OD Grinder and make my bushings fit. I would accept some small pitting to remain of stock removal exceeded  .100" per side. You could remove the stock with ceramic inserts but they are pricey.    We will see how you do it I'm sure,  Hat's of to your project.  Dave

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  • 2 weeks later...
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how are those assm rebuilt ? in house/shop

how do you confirm correct part/method

nos parts (found where) made parts,or just handy china since it will have limited use

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3 hours ago, mmi said:

how are those assm rebuilt ? in house/shop

how do you confirm correct part/method

nos parts (found where) made parts,or just handy china since it will have limited use

The engine crank was sent out for grinding. All the other parts rebuilt in house.  Parts are checked carefully and only rebuilt as necessary.  Some NOS parts, always the best we can find.  So far so good!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Haven't seen water pump pulley threads that clean well like forever 

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  • 1 month later...

Checking over the dash and electrical components to make sure there are no extra holes where they shouldn’t be. Waiting for the pistons and rods to come back from the engine shop since we needed new bushings.

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