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154 Cub Low Boy Q’s


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I know they are kind of quirky, and basically an oddball, but I have a friend that has offered to trade me one that runs well for a John Deere 70 diesel that I got with my place that has not run in about 20 year and is short a flywheel. My first question is, what is the availability of a pto adapter to use a standard 540 implement (yes it does have a 3 pt). 2nd, any thoughts on the trade, the 70 is just sitting there but I don’t know if I have a real use for the cub either, but at least it’s the right color and runs. I’m going to go look at the cub this weekend, it is stored inside and I have a feeling it’s really nice, anyhow thoughts and opinions are welcome.

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the pto adapters are relatively hard to find if its got a deck it makes a good large area mower turning is not one of its fine points  I have a 154 myself 

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do ALL cub pto run wrong speed and backward?

anyhow 154 is the one to run from poor R & D  $$$ NLA parts

70 is about same  $$  and expect it would run,flywheel was likely loose and rather than the $$$ repair they opted for cheap which ends in $$$$$ cause it was done wrong or lost

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both tractors are sorry, but the 154 doesn't take up as much room in the shop.  🤥  the 154 frame will break on rh side where the 1/2" holes are in it at  axle bolt up, that can be fixed if it hasn't already messed up the driveshaft and trans input shaft. make angle iron brackets to bolt (5/8" bolt holes) in  bull gear drops to front of trans, and frame, you'll see what needs to be done.  pto clutch has no hope!    😬   however look at driveshaft & pto parts diagram on a cub 184.   🙂

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154 PTO turns the wrong direction and runs way too fast.  Can't run 540 equipment with it.  8 years ago I thought the Lo-Boy's would be a good small tractor.  I found out real quick they were too big to be a garden tractor, too small to be a decent tractor.  Not having a PTO pretty much made it worthless.  IH did build rear mounted equipment for them though, if you can find it.  They had a tiller and some mowers.  I just recently traded my LB's for a 284.  Hopefully I like it better. 

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The PTO was never considered as a "standard" (i.e. ASAE standard) tractor PTO but was designed to run Cub only implements.  The tractor does not have enough power to run conventional farm PTO machines.  The shaft is directly connected to gear-box input shaft, so not being driven by a countershaft turns the wrong way, and at much higher speed than 540 rpm.  It was conceived as power for the Cub 22 mounted mower etc.  The PTO shaft has also non-standard diameter and splines to preclude someone trying to attach standard PTO implements to it.

With respect to PTO speeds, other tractor makes did similar things, the Ferguson TEA20 PTO only runs at 540 rpm IF (and ONLY IF) you run the engine at 1500 rpm.  The International Harvester O-12 has to limit the 2000 rpm engine to 1400 rpm (they made a special clip to fit on governor control lever sector to limit throttle setting) if you wanted 540 rpm at the PTO.

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It runs the mower just fine it was intended to be marketed mainly as a mower tractor and we sold quite a few of them never sold any of the other attachments that were available back then sold one with the the hub city gearbox that adapted it to 540 rpm with the correct rotation

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Just now, R190 said:

It runs the mower just fine it was intended to be marketed mainly as a mower tractor and we sold quite a few of them never sold any of the other attachments that were available back then sold one with the the hub city gearbox that adapted it to 540 rpm with the correct rotation and just about anything you put on it used all 15 of the available horsepower

 

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Hmm, sounds like the only way the 154 would be usable for anything would be by finding a mower deck for it, which is probably easier said than done. Of course I already have a little diesel Kubota that I mow with. I have to go look at a stove pipe install for the guy that has it so I will take a look at it regardless, though I’m really still on the fence on this one.

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Ive blowen up several PTO clutch packs running the McGee snow blower on our 185.

finally got tired of the nonsense and removed the PTO assembly all to geather and added a vangard 16 Hp twin.

runs great and the 185 motor isn't screaming trying to do it all. 

mower decks show up on Craigs list all the time for this series of tractor.

Mike

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The 70 is pretty clean, but has been sitting about 20 years, flywheel broke and is gone. Has a 3 pt but not sure it came that way from the factory. Defiantly a project but looks like it’s got a lot of potential.

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8 hours ago, DaveinSD said:

The 70 is pretty clean, but has been sitting about 20 years, flywheel broke and is gone. Has a 3 pt but not sure it came that way from the factory. Defiantly a project but looks like it’s got a lot of potential.

Even short a flywheel if its in nice shape should be worth  more than a Low Boy Cub mini me?   Local guy has a 70D sitting in a field here, nobody else knows its even there as you have to run a private road about a mile through the woods to get there.  He put a taperlock flywheel on it, but it has set for better than a decade, and I think its locked up now.  Its pretty rough.  His brother told me about it, as he would like to see someone get it and do something with it....................So went and looked at it, tried to buy it, I pretty much figured the price was the flywheel..................Nope, wanted $4000 for it, its still setting there!  The diesel putt-putts here were always a high dollar item, thought one would be neat to have, probably because we never could afford one.

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33 minutes ago, Art From Coleman said:

And in another 50 years or so, someone like Mr. Lorenzo will discover it and take awesome pictures of it "still setting there".

Climate is not as nice to things here as out there............50 years you might see the block and transmission case?  

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3 hours ago, TP from Central PA said:

  The diesel putt-putts here were always a high dollar item, thought one would be neat to have, probably because we never could afford one.

If I could somehow transport all the 2 cylinder diesels around here Star Trek style to your part of the world I could almost double my money.  I have my uncle’s black dash 820 but I will own a 830 and maybe an R before my time is up because we had those two tractors back in the day.

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22 hours ago, o121937 said:

The PTO was never considered as a "standard" (i.e. ASAE standard) tractor PTO but was designed to run Cub only implements.  The tractor does not have enough power to run conventional farm PTO machines.  The shaft is directly connected to gear-box input shaft, so not being driven by a countershaft turns the wrong way, and at much higher speed than 540 rpm.  It was conceived as power for the Cub 22 mounted mower etc.  The PTO shaft has also non-standard diameter and splines to preclude someone trying to attach standard PTO implements to it.

With respect to PTO speeds, other tractor makes did similar things, the Ferguson TEA20 PTO only runs at 540 rpm IF (and ONLY IF) you run the engine at 1500 rpm.  The International Harvester O-12 has to limit the 2000 rpm engine to 1400 rpm (they made a special clip to fit on governor control lever sector to limit throttle setting) if you wanted 540 rpm at the PTO.

 

20 hours ago, R190 said:

It runs the mower just fine it was intended to be marketed mainly as a mower tractor and we sold quite a few of them never sold any of the other attachments that were available back then sold one with the the hub city gearbox that adapted it to 540 rpm with the correct rotation

You guys are talking about the F-Cub.  The 154, 185 and 184 were different.  The PTO on them was a jackshaft ran off belts attached to a pulley bolted to the flywheel.  

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I agree that the first comment was about the Farmall Cub, but the 154 PTO still turns the same way even though belt driven and the speed can be different, via pulley size adjustments, but the concept that it was to power Cub sized implements doesn't change.

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Cub sized yes, but a better term is Cub specific implements.  Lots of implements can be "Cub sized" and work on other machines.  But the Cub specific implements work only on the Cub.  I would have to check, but I don't think that the F-Cub implements, such as a rear mower, will work on the Lo-Boy, or if there even were PTO driven implements for the F-Cub other than mowers.  The LB line had a front snow blower, belly mower, sickle mower, I believe a flail mower (but I may be thinking of the FC), rear tiller and a rear mower.  The rear tiller looked identical to the one offered for the 982, but with a Cat 1 hitch, and offset PTO shaft.  Obviously made by the same company building them for the Cub Cadet line. 

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I have a nice 154 loboy. Pto runs backwards and too fast. The clutches on them are a nightmare period. Very difficult to keep em adjusted right. If its on small rubber the gearing will be fine for mowing. If its on high rubber they are geared too high for most things. The little flathead engines are very simple amd reliable bit a little down on power with high rubber unless it has a crawler gear. Most parts are easily found especially driveline stuff. They are neat little units but hard to keep the clutches right on em. Mine has a 3pt and i have disced with it. Dad has a little offset we used in his garden. Moral of the story is do not overstress the drivetrain. Hamilton bobs is a great source for them. I have bobs number if ya want it. Hes very helpful.

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22 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

If I could somehow transport all the 2 cylinder diesels around here Star Trek style to your part of the world I could almost double my money.  I have my uncle’s black dash 820 but I will own a 830 and maybe an R before my time is up because we had those two tractors back in the day.

I can see your wanting an 830, but I'd drag your feet on an R.  Talk about a gutless pig. R was rated 48 hp IIRC, Super M-TA either 47 or 48. And guess what? We parked the 4 bottom Deere plow the R couldn't pull fast enough and pulled the 3-14 IH #8. We did hook the SM-TA up to the Deere 4-14 to plow the last 16 acres of old corn ground. Could have pulled 3-14's 5 mph or the 4-14's 3-3/4 mph, same acres per hour. R has smallest pony motor, starts hard. R only had 5 speeds, 4 too slow tillage gears and a too slow, 11 mph road gear.  Don't run anything that requires much pto hp on an R, we only ran pto to get hydraulics. Township road commissioner who bought our R knocked the pto drivetrain out three times in 3 years running a heavy rototiller. He replaced the R with a 770 Oliver diesel I was still running 10 years later with no repairs. And Dad put Char-Lynn power assist steering on the R, because it was "My tractor"  R had a little BIG engine too, only 416 cid, and Mother Deere governed them anywhere from 975 rpm to almost 1100.    Neighbor's 730 diesel with the V-4 pony would be running before the pony was wound up over half rated speed. That 730 would pull with our 4010 before we had someone competent work on the inj pump. 730 wasn't running at the neighbor's auction, no idea why.

    I'd look for an 80 instead of the R.

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20 hours ago, J-Mech said:

 

You guys are talking about the F-Cub.  The 154, 185 and 184 were different.  The PTO on them was a jackshaft ran off belts attached to a pulley bolted to the flywheel.  


I was talking specifically about the cub number series Not the F-cub

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I can see your wanting an 830, but I'd drag your feet on an R.  Talk about a gutless pig. R was rated 48 hp IIRC, Super M-TA either 47 or 48. And guess what? We parked the 4 bottom Deere plow the R couldn't pull fast enough and pulled the 3-14 IH #8. We did hook the SM-TA up to the Deere 4-14 to plow the last 16 acres of old corn ground. Could have pulled 3-14's 5 mph or the 4-14's 3-3/4 mph, same acres per hour. R has smallest pony motor, starts hard. R only had 5 speeds, 4 too slow tillage gears and a too slow, 11 mph road gear.  Don't run anything that requires much pto hp on an R, we only ran pto to get hydraulics. Township road commissioner who bought our R knocked the pto drivetrain out three times in 3 years running a heavy rototiller. He replaced the R with a 770 Oliver diesel I was still running 10 years later with no repairs. And Dad put Char-Lynn power assist steering on the R, because it was "My tractor"  R had a little BIG engine too, only 416 cid, and Mother Deere governed them anywhere from 975 rpm to almost 1100.    Neighbor's 730 diesel with the V-4 pony would be running before the pony was wound up over half rated speed. That 730 would pull with our 4010 before we had someone competent work on the inj pump. 730 wasn't running at the neighbor's auction, no idea why.

    I'd look for an 80 instead of the R.

 

I've read your story a 100 times because you have posted it 100 times.  Reason I want an R is because we farmed with one like I said earlier.   I still have the operators manual for ours. Do you understand that???  First of all its not like I'm going to go out and plow 1,000 acres so I don't care about what past deficiencies the R might have had.  2nd, the 80 was only made for one year making them somewhat hard and expensive to buy.  We bought the R used in 1959 the same year great grandpa traded off his IH 600 for a new JD 830.  Don't know if that was a coincidence or not.  Grandpa used it along side his TD 14A and I have reel film of the R pulling two 14ft drills.  Keep in mind before the R and 830 we were 100% IH.  We had a Farmall M as our haying tractor, TD 14, the mentioned TD 14A,  great grandpa had a distillate burning W9, then a WD9, the 600 before giving up on IH for the 830.  The R got traded in for JD 5010 in 1965 and the TD 14A was retired from farming.  If you are suggesting a Super MTA can out pull an R then they could out pull a WD9.  Because they were about as equal as two tractors could get and we and other farmers pulled the same size plows with both tractors.  So in your opinion would a Super MTA out pull an WD9?  I kind of laugh you are comparing an R to a rowcrop tractor anyway.  Why don't you compare it to its primary competitor the WD9.  I wonder how many transmission speeds they had???  I'm guessing it was maybe 5.  Probably all too slow??  I'll have to look it up because I still have manuals for that tractor too.  And on the PTO, AT LEAST THEY HAD A LIVE PTO!!!!  Yes they were weak, JD collectors, JD authors/researchers, and JD themselves acknowledged that.  So they beefed them up on the 80.  And yet IH still didn't have a live PTO until the 660.  So yes I get it, you don't like the R and that's fine.  But I do and they worked great for a lot of other farmers.   Over 17,000 units sold in North America alone doesn't lie.  

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